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Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by Backshop on Sunday, January 16, 2022 7:46 PM

The SP Acadian connected New Orleans to Houston via Beaumont. The CN Acadian connected Montreal and Halifax. The food is Cajun. 

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, January 16, 2022 12:05 PM

How about a similar question.  These two trains shared the same name, one in Canada connecting two major seaports, the other connecting three Gulf Coast ports.  The name of a cuisine common in the region of the second train is a corruption of the word used in the trains' name.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Sunday, January 16, 2022 11:13 AM

rcdrye

Don't have the CP train numbers (yet).

Imperial (or Imperial Limited) Canadian Pacific Montreal-Vancouver

discontined around 1931.  CPR's Dominion and later Canadian operated on the same route.

 

CRI&P/SP Imperial 39/40 Chicago-Los Angeles.  The name was first used on a local Yuma-LA train but it became the secondary train on the Golden State route after WWII. Routed through California's Imperial Valley, it also carried a San Diego Sleeper for at least a few years after WWII.  It remained mainly as a mail and express train into the 1960s.

 

Yes, The Imperial was the name I was looking for. CP's version (as the Imperial Limited) began in 1899 as a seasonal operation, becoming year-round in 1911. The "Limited" designation was dropped in 1929, and the train itself was discontinued in 1933.

Your description of the RI/SP Imperial was correct, as their Imperial was secondary to the Golden State Limited. Other Golden State Route trains that filled this role at one time or another include: Californian, Apache, Southwest Express, Chicago Special, California Special, California Fast Mail, and Chicago Fast Mail.

Rcdrye, you have the next question...

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, January 15, 2022 4:58 PM

Don't have the CP train numbers (yet).

Imperial (or Imperial Limited) Canadian Pacific Montreal-Vancouver

discontined around 1931.  CPR's Dominion and later Canadian operated on the same route.

 

CRI&P/SP Imperial 39/40 Chicago-Los Angeles.  The name was first used on a local Yuma-LA train but it became the secondary train on the Golden State route after WWII. Routed through California's Imperial Valley, it also carried a San Diego Sleeper for at least a few years after WWII.  It remained mainly as a mail and express train into the 1960s.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Thursday, January 13, 2022 7:16 PM

Up to a decade before WW2, you were able to ride this Canadian transcontinental. After WW2 you were able to ride a western transcontinental with the same name.

The name and the routes, please...

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Thursday, January 13, 2022 7:16 PM

daveklepper

Waiting

 

we all are....

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, January 10, 2022 10:53 AM

Waiting

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Monday, December 27, 2021 3:10 PM

rcdrye

ZO has the correct answer.  The practice of running daily except Saturday continued into the late 1940s at least.  The advent of the daily through Pullmans from the Super Chief may have been the changeover.  During the 1920s the Century frequently ran in multiple sections, but apparently never on Christmas.

 

Actually, the ex-Saturday 20th Century Limited operation was a product of the 1950's (BTW - the 20th Century did operate on Christmas Saturday, 1937, per NYC schedules and Official Guides of the time.)

The 20th Century Limited was a daily operation from its inception until June of 1953, when Saturday runs were scrubbed from July 4 to Labor Day, at which time daily operation resumed. Beginning in April 1954 through April 1958, the 20th Century consistently had no Saturday departures. Between 1954 and 1956, additional runs were scrubbed in and around holidays; sometimes only on the actual holiday, such as July 4 and Labor Day, but in November and December the Century did not run for a number of days around the Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years holidays. This time period of no-Saturday Centuries coinsided with financial difficuties NYC was having at the time - the railroad was trying to save money any way it can without signaling to the public the problems it was having.

As for the Commodore Vanderbilt, the Saturday schedule change (when the Century was not operating) was the exception rather than the rule - the Commodore was operated on the Century's schedule on Saturdays only during the summer of 1954. There was another short time period where the Commodore operated on a schedule closer to - but not mimicing - the Century's. Otherwise the Commodore was a daily train and remained on its own schedule.

In April 1958, the 20th Century Limited resumed its daily operation (and would remain so until its discontinuance), but running "combined" with the Commodore Vanderbilt, the latter becoming a train on paper only until October 1960, when the name was dropped from NYC timetables.

A new question will be forthcoming in a few days.....

Happy New Year all.......

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Monday, December 27, 2021 2:31 PM

daveklepper

Did the practice of no 20th on Saturday continue until the Commodore Vanderbilt was discontinued?

Since you provided the only correct answer, you should ask another question.

 

The practice of ex-Saturday 20th Century ended when the Commodore Vanderbilt was combined with the 20th Century in April, 1958.

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, December 27, 2021 6:51 AM

There's a reason I didn't make the 'small edit' -- it wouldn't be fair.

I had thought there was actual subway-equipment operation through the tunnels.  Since that ain't so, my answer shouldn't count.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, December 27, 2021 6:15 AM

ZO has the correct answer.  The practice of running daily except Saturday continued into the late 1940s at least.  The advent of the daily through Pullmans from the Super Chief may have been the changeover.  During the 1920s the Century frequently ran in multiple sections, but apparently never on Christmas.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 27, 2021 12:26 AM

Did the practice of no 20th on Saturday continue until the Commodore Vanderbilt was discontinued?

Since you provided the only correct answer, you should ask another question.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Sunday, December 26, 2021 9:02 PM

rcdrye

Here's a softball question:  In most years, New York Central's Twentieth Century Limited operated on Christmas.  About once every six years, it took Christmas off.  What was the reason?

 

For a number of years, the 20th Century Limited did not operate on Saturdays, especially after WW2. So, when Dec 25 fell on a Saturday, the 20th Century Limited had two reasons not to operate. Instead, the Commodore Vanderbilt would usually operate on the 20th Century's schedule, even handling the transcontinental Pullmans the latter would handle the other days of the week.

 

Happy Holidays to all.....

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 26, 2021 11:39 AM

If my answer was not correct, then it had to do with equip ment maintenance scheduling.  Or crew scheduling on sundays and hoklidays.

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, December 26, 2021 7:36 AM

Because of the way it worked out with leap years the Century ran every depression Christmas except 1937.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 26, 2021 3:35 AM

Nobody eished to ride that day.  (The Holiday and heightb of the Deression)

And the small edit overmod should vhave was to deletes any reference to subway use.

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, December 25, 2021 11:13 AM

If it's any help, it wouldn't be running today.  In years it ran it almost always ran as a single section.

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, December 24, 2021 7:38 AM

Here's a softball question:  In most years, New York Central's Twentieth Century Limited operated on Christmas.  About once every six years, it took Christmas off.  What was the reason?

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, December 24, 2021 4:48 AM

If Overmold doesn't wish to do the small edit on his answer to correct it, possibly because he doesn't have another good question at the moment, rc, why don't step-up-to-the-plate/

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, December 21, 2021 11:32 AM

Overmod, you should be able to edit your answer, so it is 100% correct.  please do that and ask the next question.

Tunnels that first saw only el cars than subway cars include the lower level of 9th Avenue Station. the Culver using the lower level, and West End, was B and  is now D the upper, with lower only for storage; the tunnel between the junction west of 9th Avenue Station (incines only yard, formerly to Shop and 5th Avenue El.); and the subway between Williamsburg Bridge and Chamber Street Station, where El cars were used until enough steels came on-line.

Main Street, Flushing was different.  IRT subway cars went there several years b efore BMT sevice started with El cars from Queens plaza.  Now only the 7.  2nd Av. El. cars never went beyond Wollets pt. blvd into Main street.

 

 

T

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 20, 2021 5:43 AM

You might be confused by the two-car "Polo Grounds Shuttle" looking like a two-car subway train, and my statement that Jerome Avenue service was first provided by 9th and 6th Avenue elevated trains before the lexington avenue subway was opened.   The tunnels were used be those eklevated trains and then by the Shuttle.  The shuttle equipment was equipment that had operasted in the original subway, but was transferred to Third Avenue and Second Avenue rush-our express trains, as soon as enough steel cars were available, were then equipped with gravity-type 3rd-rail shoes, and could no longer operate in sucway service.  In June, 1940, a small group, twelve, were transferred, via South Ferry and the Ninth Avenue Elevated, to the  yard  north bof the Polo Grounds folr the Shuttle, and then to the Jerome - Woodlawn yard when the yard north of the Polo Grouns closed for apartment house development.  As long as the Shuttle ran the elevated-type 3rd Rail was maintained, along with thw subway type, on Jerome Avemue. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 20, 2021 3:55 AM

Please reread my complete answer, look at the history, and re-phrase your reply.  I noted that the tunnels exist, but are sealed.

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, December 19, 2021 3:01 PM

Aren't those the ones that were elevated-railroad tunnels before they were subway tunnels?

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 19, 2021 3:57 AM

I'll assu me the answer was correct and ask the next question:

What wsas unique about the two single track tunnels between the Sedgewick Avenue and Jerome-Anderson stations that made them the only two-of-a-kindf in all of N. America?

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 9, 2021 9:03 AM

A wider-angle view, with both the Shuttle and a Lex. Ave. Express in the picture:

And an arial view. showing thr Putnam Bridge, as well as the McCoombs Dasm Bridge that once hosted two Bronx streetcar lines:

The large apartment-building complex, north of the Polo Grounds Stadium, was the  site of the 9th and 6th Avenue Elevateds' main yard.  It existed through WWII and was used to store elevated  cars wating to be scrapped or sold.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 9, 2021 8:48 AM

In the   of interest of accuracy:  In June 1940, when the 9th Avenue Elevated was discontinued below 155th Street and oth Avenue, the only subway train stopping at 155th Street and 8th Avenue was the CC, full-time.  The D was inaugurated in 1942, with the opening of the 6th Avenue subway, with the CC rush-hours only, asnd the D local north of 145th Street except rush hours in the direction of heavy travel.

Also, for a very short time, the Shuttle ran north of 167th Street to Burnside Avenue.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 9, 2021 4:18 AM

I ought to add that the first service on the Jerome Avenue elevated structure was by 6th and 9th Avenue elevated trains.  Thhe Lexington Avenue subway trains, now thw "4," came a few hyears later.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 9, 2021 4:14 AM

Most of the 155th Street & 8th Avenue Elevated Station, the "Putnam Bridge," used until the Dual-Contracts implimentation, with the extension of the Ninth (also Sixth during rush-hours) Elevated trains to  the Jerome Avenue line in The Bronx (No. 4 Subway trains today), by NYCentral Putnam Divission to reach the 155th Street Elevated Station, and two restricted-clearance single-track tunnels, and the elevated structure on 162nd Street in The Bronx connecting to the Jerome Avenue sgtructure, with the actual switches just south of 167th Street Station, survived as the "Polo Gronds Shuttle."  Stations were 167th and Jerome, shared with what is now the "4." Jerome-Anderson Avenue, partly in the tunnels on their east side, Sedgewick Avenue, with the westbound-southbound platform serving also as the cocourse for the new Sedgewick Avenue southern terminal for Putnam Divisdion trains, and 155th St. and 8th Avenue as the southern and  western terminal.  Free paper transfers were exchanged the with CC subway trains and the D at times they did not run express in the Bronx.

The purpose of this shuttle was primarily to connect with Putnam Divisdion trains, and  secondarily to provide a more convenient way for Jerome Svenue trasnsit users to reach the Polo Grounds than the stairways and paper trasnsfers at 161st Street, River Avenue, Yankee Stadium.

It was also useful for residents near the Jerom-Anderson station.

It was discontinued, the tunnels sealed, and the 162 Street  elevated structure and Putnam Bridge removed after Putnam Division passenger service ended and the Polo Grounds closed as a National League Stadium for the New York Giants  baseball team.

Attached a photo with a two-car composite shuttle trainm showing its relationship to the Lexington Avenue - Jerome Avenue subway line, now the "4." located on River Street south of 167th Street Station:

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Wednesday, December 8, 2021 12:11 PM

Bumping this up. Can we get additional clues or even a different question?

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 21, 2021 7:27 AM

Both structures were remved before 7 December 1941.  I should have made it clear during the USA's militarially active role in winning the war.  You're close on one, though.

Two involved bridges.  Not necessarily the same two, two also involved streetcar line changes.

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