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Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by Backshop on Thursday, April 4, 2024 2:25 AM

Dave, you were correct.  I was thinking of the P&LE, TH&B and B&A.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, April 4, 2024 1:23 AM

NYC  Subsidiary Pittsburgh & bLake Erie baught the lightest and most modern Birkshires.  Not certain if you count Toronto Hamilton & Buffalo as a NYC Sysytem subsidiary, since it was half-owned by CP, but I think they had a few.  In any case MC should qualify.

I'll be glad to give the next question bto RC, since he did give a full correct asnswer first, even if different than that you had when asking the question.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, April 3, 2024 11:59 PM

Well,  the  New York Central had no Birkshires, but three of their subsidiaries probably had them, onr the Boston and Albany, and one  the last domrstic  steam built by ALCO and the lightest of the 2-8-4s, but the exact names of the two subsidiaries escapes me, but i'll olookfor that information.

 

Possibly because the B&A's went to the Michigan Central when the B&A had very early dieselization, that may also be one of the three.

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Posted by Backshop on Wednesday, April 3, 2024 8:09 PM

Overmod

This just came up in a different context.

The Railroad is PRR, the wheel arrangement is 4-8-4, and the N&W (of course!), the LV (some with 77" drivers), and the Wabash were three subsidiaries that had them.

 

While correct, that wasn't the answer that I was looking for. You're close, geographically, though.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, April 3, 2024 6:32 PM

This just came up in a different context.

The Railroad is PRR, the wheel arrangement is 4-8-4, and the N&W (of course!), the LV (some with 77" drivers), and the Wabash were three subsidiaries that had them.

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Posted by Backshop on Wednesday, April 3, 2024 3:33 PM

This major American railroad had no 20th century had no locomotives of a certain wheel arrangement but three of their partially/wholly owned subsidiaries did.  Who were the railroads and what was the wheel arrangement?

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, March 31, 2024 4:43 AM

That's what I had.

You're up!

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Posted by Backshop on Friday, March 29, 2024 8:44 PM

The first 21 GP39's had AC alternators (C&O-20 and ASAB-1) while the last two for Kennecott Copper had DC generators.

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, March 29, 2024 1:50 PM

The Q2s were apparently all built with them, and I can find no indication that any rebuilding removed them.  Dave Stephenson (feltonhill) said he had gone through every picture he could find and saw none that didn't have the piping to the booster present. The 

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, March 29, 2024 12:16 PM

daveklepper
Did  the last two of the PRR's 2-10-4s, copied from the C&O design, lack trailing-truck boosters that the earlier examples had?

That's an interesting question in its own right!  Let me see if I can find out.

But by 'turbocharged' I mean a production (not experimental) diesel engine.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 28, 2024 10:10 PM

Did  the last two of the PRR's 2-10-4s, copied from the C&O design, lack trailing-truck boosters that the earlier examples had?

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, March 28, 2024 11:01 AM

The last two examples of this class of turbocharged locomotive had a counterintuitive and unusual mechanical difference from the others.  What was the class, and the difference?

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 28, 2024 3:13 AM

Your secoond answer, Fort Collins, Colorado, is the ne I wanted.  Three single-track lines, neeting in a wye downtown, one car on each line at one time, cars covering each line in rotation (clockwise or counter-clockwise?).

Next question please.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, March 27, 2024 11:02 PM

We were running at least one Birney at the time of the fire, and I think it may be running again now (I don't spend enough free time downtown to have observed).

As the 'real' answer, let me throw out Fort Collins Municipal Railway (originating pre-Birneys as the Denver & Interurban, associated with C&S and intended as connecting with them) as being what you want as an answer... last service mid-1951? (With the last two of the Birneys -- admittedly they were those Brill 'Birneys' -- arriving from Virginia as late as 1946!)

... incidentally they started running Birney 21 again under the auspices of the Fort Collins Municipal Railway Society in 1977 and have restored it to 1919 form -- they recently got Brill 25 back after quite an odyssey and have it running too.

They expect to start up for the 'season' on May 4th, and you or I would only pay $1 to ride...

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, March 27, 2024 10:58 PM

.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, March 27, 2024 12:29 PM

The streetcar operation that I believe answers my latest Forum question ran for several years after WWII, and I am unaware of any Memphis operation that continued longer.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, March 26, 2024 5:23 PM

Do the single-truck Birney cars on the 'riverside loop' in Memphis count as 'regular service' for purposes of this question?  Whistling

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, March 26, 2024 8:22 AM

What was the last streetcar line to use single-truck Birney cars in regular transit service?

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, March 22, 2024 5:53 PM

I'm throwing this open  to keep it alive.  I don't have anything remotely as good as the last few questions on the other thread.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, February 17, 2024 10:06 AM

Still don't have anything worthwhile, but I'm bumping to keep it visible.

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, February 4, 2024 2:06 PM

Well done!  The first five, lettered for Virginian as 900-904, never ran there, becoming N&W 2000-2004 instead.   The USA class and postwar USB class (many rebuilt to USC and USD) eventually numbered 40 engines. The ex-N&W USEs came from the AT&SF in 1947, which bought them for helper service from the N&W in 1943. Though not the original 5, they were the same N&W Y-3 class as the first USRA engines.

Virginian also had 7 pre-USRA 2-8-8-2s (class AD and AE, Alco-Richmond 1910)

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, February 4, 2024 12:52 PM

That's going to be the USRA 2-8-8-2 (notably enough, substantially developed out of the Y2 class of the 'most famous of the three railroads' -- a set of blueprints being helpfully made available to the USRA design committee early.)

Those first five were lettered for the Virginian.  The latter 20 acquired by that road were their (appropriately chosen!) USA class; I can't find any mention of the 'second' road they might have been offered to while VGN was reluctant to take them immediately postwar.

There were 15 more (USB) in 1923, but I can find no indication of these being built for someone else.

The Virginian USE was (coming more than full circle) ex-N&W Y-3s.

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, February 2, 2024 7:31 AM

Penn Station Third rail had about the same clearance diagram as Grand Central.  The old "Official Register of Passengr Train Equipment" had restriction lists for various classes of equipment. Without going too far into the weeds, there were several variations of the GSC truck with outside swing hangers.  My bet is that Pullman (and Pullman-Bradley) made sure the ones intended for use in the New York area were carefully chosen.  Oof course all of the Budd-built 10-6s from AT&SF, UP ans SP that made up the backbone of Amtrak's sleeper fleet were OSH-equipped.

One of the USRA types created during WWI was designed for a specific service.  The first 5, built by Alco-Schenectady, were lettered and numbered for one railroad, but ended up being delivered to a second, where they formed the basis of a large and famous class, most of which were not built by Alco.  The first railroad did eventually get similar engines built by Alco-Richmond, along with some post-USRA examples from the second railroad via a third railroad.  Name all three railroads.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, February 2, 2024 2:40 AM

1.  The AT&SF baggage cars sold to the NYNH&H were pre-WWII.

2.  But both underrunning NYCentral and standard H&M, BMT-IND, LIRR third rail had no problem with regular swing-hanger trucks,  Recall that post-WWII AT&SF sleepers ran into both Penn and GCT in transcontinental sleeper service.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, February 1, 2024 7:33 PM

rcdrye
...a lot of later AT&SF equipment had outside swing hanger trucks, which weren't allowed in third rail territory.

According to John White, some of the most extreme-width OSH trucks were provided on late orders of New Haven equipment -- he even has a cross-section of one in The American Passenger Car.  Were cars with those bolster arrangements only allowed to operate into Penn Station, and not to GCT by way of New Rochelle?

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, February 1, 2024 8:00 AM

The AT&SF baggage cars must have been pre-war, as a lot of later AT&SF equipment had outside swing hanger trucks, which weren't allowed in third rail territory.

The milk cars off the D&H and Rutland must have been handled on the West Side line.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, February 1, 2024 7:21 AM

By aaven's  wood baggll means ask the next question.  You got the right railroad  for the MUs, but not the New  Haven's Wood short baggage-only cars, which continued to enter and leave GCT until the Central insisted they be replaced, which they were with a few AT&SF lightweights.

The original NYNH&H AC-DC MUs, which were open-platform, but longer than the Central's DC MUs, ran into GCT until around 1948. But continued in use on the Norwalk - Danbury shuttle and the New Cannan  Stamford shuttle, the latter until the 4400s, the :"Wasboards" arrived.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 31, 2024 1:40 PM

New Haven still had some open-platform MU cars into the 1940s.  The wooden cars would be express refrigerator cars.  Express and milk reefers continued in use on the west side line until the milk trains stopped in the late 1950s.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, January 31, 2024 7:39 AM

The DeLaware & Hudson also had all-steel open-platform coaches in Sranton - Carbondale service, which I rode in the summer, 1950.

But these into GCT were even more unique and lasted also lasted until until well after WWII, although in the  end their last assignment did not include running into GCT, just every connection possible with trains  that did.

And some wood non-perople cars  did continue to serve the railroad for a  few years, but not into GCT.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, January 29, 2024 10:09 AM

I can reluctantly understand why South Shore gets overlooked since it started losing its interurban character when the Insull steel cars were delivered in 1927.  I would opine that South Shore lost its last interurban characteristics when the steeplecabs were retired since mainline street running also existed on several steam railroads.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul

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