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Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by NorthWest on Tuesday, August 26, 2014 4:08 PM

GN's steepest grades were electrified at this time, so only Marias Pass had to be contended with by diesels.

E7s originally operated the Empire Builder, but were reassigned due to difficulties on the pass.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, September 7, 2014 6:32 AM

so ask the next question!

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Sunday, September 7, 2014 9:01 AM

Who has the question at this time? 

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Posted by NorthWest on Sunday, September 7, 2014 10:22 AM

I think rcdrye.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, September 8, 2014 5:58 AM

My oops in not posting a question. 

At the end of the 1950s EMD offered a switcher variant designed to replace steam switch engines still in use at passenger stations.  Only two were built, neither for passenger terminal service.  Name the purchaser and the model.

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Posted by NorthWest on Monday, September 8, 2014 9:17 AM

EMD RS1325,

C&IM.

By this time, there really wasn't a market for new switchers. IIRC, they were intended to get a taller nose, sort of like the NW5, if they had a steam generator. As the two lacked it, they got the standard GP/SD hood.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, September 8, 2014 12:59 PM

Good kickstart question and answer.  On with the thread!

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Posted by NorthWest on Monday, September 8, 2014 5:40 PM

Bit of a fun one skirting the rules:

These NYC Subway cars celebrate their 50th birthday tomorrow, being unveiled to the public on September 9th.

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 7:31 AM

IRT R-36 series

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Posted by NorthWest on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 8:23 AM

Nope, the R36s were placed in service in late July, and were retired in the early 2000s.

These cars are still in service!

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 9:11 AM

Budd R-32s

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 10:19 AM

correct.  You got there before me.   rode the demonstration train GCT - Harmon

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Posted by NP Eddie on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 11:41 AM

Dave:

What is the average service life of either an NYC or CTA subway car?

Which shop in New York City or Chicago does major work on those cars (wreck damaged or other)?

Ed Burns

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 1:37 PM

average life, depends on the period you are talking about.   original Gibbs cars 1904 - 1949. original BMT steels 1915  1967     

But R44's, except for STaten Island     1978 -2006

I would estimate 35 years, which is typical for rapid transit and commuter equipment in North America, light rail also.

The R-32's were the first mass-produced stainless-steel rapid transit cars in North America

The heaviest rebuilding and overhauling of New York's subway equipment occurs at the ex-BMT Coney Island Shops.   The IND facility north of the 207th St. A  terminal is newer, but the BMT shops were modernized and are larger and easier to switch.   The major IRT shops for repair and overhaul no longer exist, and were where the "Lenox Terminal" of the 3 line was.   207th St. did the preparation for 'reefing' of scrapped cars, however.

Skokie shops along the Skokie Swift ex-North Shore line was CRT's overhaul shop and remains that for CTA  today.  But North Shore never used it.  Its shop was at Highland Park on the Shore line.

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Posted by NorthWest on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 5:57 PM

rcdyre gets it! Dave, I'd love to here your story, though. Will you post about your experience? I've started a  thread at http://cs.trains.com/trn/f/742/t/232381.aspx.

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 8:57 PM

In the 1920s CRT did quite a bit of work for the North Shore at the Skokie Shops, especially painting and interior work.  The practice pretty much ended with the collapse of the Insull empire.

I'll post a new question tomorrow morning.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, September 10, 2014 7:40 PM

rcdrye
I'll post a new question tomorrow morning.

Oh all right... tomorrow night...

In 1953 PRR's Penn Texas carried cars between New York and three Texas cities connecting to two different railroads at St. Louis, plus a Washington sleeper to one city.  Name the cities and railroads, including the final carrier for one of the trains.

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Posted by KCSfan on Thursday, September 11, 2014 7:53 AM

NY -  San Antonio Frisco/Katy Texas Special

NY -  El Paso MoPac/T&P Texas Eagle

NY - Houston MoPac/T&P Texas Eagle

Washington - Houston MoPac/T&P Texas Eagle

Mark

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, September 11, 2014 9:10 AM

Got all the destinations. Missing one car and route. 

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Posted by KCSfan on Thursday, September 11, 2014 10:33 AM

rcdrye

Got all the destinations. Missing one car and route. 

NY - San Antonio MoPac/T&P Texas Eagle

Mark

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, September 12, 2014 7:02 PM

That's the last one.  Dallas/Ft Worth handled by the El Paso car. 

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Posted by KCSfan on Saturday, September 13, 2014 7:55 AM

The first non-articulated diesel electric passenger locomotive in the US was a two unit demonstrator built by EMD. What were the numbers and horsepower of each of these two units and in what year were they debuted in road tests on various eastern railroads? 

Mark 

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Posted by NP Eddie on Saturday, September 13, 2014 12:14 PM

KCS Fan:

Are you looking for EMD 511 and 512? Both were 1800HP units.

Ed Burns

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Posted by KCSfan on Saturday, September 13, 2014 1:50 PM

NP Eddie

KCS Fan:

Are you looking for EMD 511 and 512? Both were 1800HP units.

Ed Burns

Yes, EMD 511 & 512 are the right numbers but 1800 was not the horsepower of each unit. I'm also looking for the year they started their road trials.

Mark

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Posted by NP Eddie on Saturday, September 13, 2014 3:02 PM

I believe they were 900 HP each for a total of 1800 HP. They were built in 1935. The locomotives could be used as a pair or individually.

 

Ed Burns

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Posted by KCSfan on Saturday, September 13, 2014 4:37 PM

NP Eddie

I believe they were 900 HP each for a total of 1800 HP. They were built in 1935. The locomotives could be used as a pair or individually.

 Ed Burns

Absolutely right! The units were road tested in the winter of 1935-36. The next question is yours Ed.

Mark

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Posted by NP Eddie on Sunday, September 14, 2014 1:56 PM

Again I am honored!

These questions are about the Burlington Northern Railroad diesel locomotive roster. My main source is Del Grosso's "Burlington Northern Railroad Locomotives 1970-1996" and personal observations at Northtown.

1. What was the lowest numbered BN locomotive and what was the highest numbered BN locomotive?

2, A total of 10 road units and one switcher were wreck rebuilds without a cab. What were their numbers as rebuilt?

3. Two General Electric switcher demonstrators were loaned to the BN in the 1980's. I saw them at Northtown Diesel shop. What were their BN numbers?

Ed Burns

Happily retired NP-BN-BNSF

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, September 14, 2014 8:25 PM

NP Eddie

I believe they were 900 HP each for a total of 1800 HP. They were built in 1935. The locomotives could be used as a pair or individually.

 

Ed Burns

Both 511 and 512 had two 12 cylinder 201-A engines for a total of 1800 HP per unit, 3600 for the pair.  Santa Fe 1 and 1A, the Super Chief units, were mechanically identical, as was B&O (later Alton) 50.See the recent Classic Trains issue on E Units for more details.

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Posted by KCSfan on Monday, September 15, 2014 8:52 AM

rcdrye

NP Eddie

I believe they were 900 HP each for a total of 1800 HP. They were built in 1935. The locomotives could be used as a pair or individually.

 

Ed Burns

Both 511 and 512 had two 12 cylinder 201-A engines for a total of 1800 HP per unit, 3600 for the pair.  Santa Fe 1 and 1A, the Super Chief units, were mechanically identical, as was B&O (later Alton) 50.See the recent Classic Trains issue on E Units for more details.

I rechecked my source (Railroad History The Diesel Revolution published by the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society) and found that I was mistaken when I originally read it. It actually states, "... No's. 511-512 contained four diesels laid out in two boxcar configurations. Each diesel had eight (rather than six) cylinders totaling 900hp ..." Eddie and Rob, you are both correct, 1800 was the horsepower of each unit giving the combined pair a total of 3600-hp.

Mark

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, September 26, 2014 8:45 AM

Since this has been sitting there for a while and Ed is up on the other thread...

On this line known for high-speed operations a borrowed high-speed car made several trips onthe property in 1930, only to reappear for a much longer period as a trackage rights tenant after 1938.

Owners of the car in 1930 and 1938, and the trackage rights landlord get you the next question.  Cars' numbers in 1930 and 1938 get you respect for meticulous research.  The name of the man involved at all phases gets I don't know what.

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