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Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, July 25, 2014 6:16 AM

The Southern may have had a Charlotte = Savanna sleeper and a Charlotte  - Morehead City sleeper, the latter interlined the short line serving Morehead City.

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Posted by Deggesty on Friday, July 25, 2014 10:57 AM

The intrastate sleeper was operated on one road only. I don't know that the Southern ever operated a Charlotte-Savannah sleeper; several years earlier it did operate an Asheville-Savannah sleeper--but North Carolina is not the state with the intrastate sleeper.

Don't forget the one-way train that operated interstate on the main line. It and the intrastate train had a common terminal.

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:20 PM

I am going to rephrase the following: "The train that ran in both directions was, itself, an intrastate train which handled an intrastate sleeper, which was carried, in part, by the other train. And, it handled an interstate sleeper, which traveled on the branch and was carried, in part, by the other train (the other train was strictly a mainline train)."

The train that ran in both directions was, itself, an intrastate train which handled an intrastate sleeper, which was carried, in part, by another train. And, it handled an interstate sleeper, which traveled on the branch and was carried, in part, by the same other train (the other train was strictly a mainline train).

The (overnight) interstate train stops at point A, picks two cars up, and delivers them to the intrastate train at point B. The intrastate train carries the interstate car to point C, where it is delivered to a branchline train, which carries it about 40 miles to a port city in the next state, and then the intrastate train continues to its terminal, point D--which is also a port city. The process is reversed to take the two sleepers to their common destination.

The one-way day train, which is interstate, leaves its origin, point E, which is also a port city, in the morning and proceeds to its terminal, point B, arriving in the late afternoon--and turns an interline sleeper over to another route, which carries the car into the next state and then turns the car over to a another road yet, which carries the car about 637 miles to its destination.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 1:36 AM

Is the railroad the Atlantic Coast Line, and one of the cities Montgomery Alabama?

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 9:39 AM

Yes, Dave, Montgomery is one of the cities--but the ACL is not the railroad.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 1:44 PM

L&N.  Mobile-Montgomery -handoff to W Ry of AL?

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 1:56 PM

Aha! You have the right road, one train's end points, and the road that took the interline sleeper..

However, the handoff to the WRA was from the train that ran in one direction only, and was interstate on the L&N.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 2:35 PM

Then the sleeper probably ran Birmingham-Mobile.

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 2:40 PM

Yes, that's the intrastate sleeper, but what was the interstate sleeper handled by this train--and the Interstate sleeper handled by the train that ran in one direction only?

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 4:21 PM

I'm going to go with New York-Mobile (PRR,SR,A&WP/WRofA,L&N) and Cincinnati-Mobile (L&N)

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 5:40 PM

No, the only Mobile sleeper was the Birmingham-Mobile one. The one interchanged with the foreign line ran through Mobile, and did not get to New York.

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 11:33 AM

Think about the port cities served by the L&N's and the through sleepers it handled.

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Posted by KCSfan on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 3:39 PM

Deggesty

Think about the port cities served by the L&N's and the through sleepers it handled.

Johnny, you've had me stumped and until now I had thought it was a Southern Ry. train but couldn't find one that fit your clues. Your latest makes me think it must have been a  Pensacola - Jacksonville New Orleans - Pensacola  car that probably ran in the Gulf Wind. As I looked back it seems we were looking for an Interstate car which led me to modify my answer.

Mark 

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 3:45 PM

No, Mark, the SAL did not enter into this. Look back over the question as re-stated and the answers that have been given.

All three port cities that have been mentioned are on the L&N.

Johnny

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Posted by KCSfan on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 3:53 PM

Deggesty

No, Mark, the SAL did not enter into this. Look back over the question as re-stated and the answers that have been given

Johnny, I've revised my reply accordingly.

Mark

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 7:01 PM

Mark, there was a car from New Orleans, but it did not go to Pensacola, nor did it travel at night on the L&N.

Johnny

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Posted by KCSfan on Thursday, August 7, 2014 2:22 PM

Johnny, was the sleeper that ran in only one direction a New Orleans to Montgomery car?

Mark

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Posted by Deggesty on Sunday, August 10, 2014 4:16 PM

Mark, it was an interline car that originated in New Orleans.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, August 11, 2014 10:35 AM

Did the interline car go to Jacksonville on the SAL?

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Posted by Deggesty on Monday, August 11, 2014 11:56 AM

daveklepper

Did the interline car go to Jacksonville on the SAL?

No, the SAL does enter into this at all. As has been answered, Montgomery is the interchange point, and the car does not go to New York City.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, August 11, 2014 1:12 PM

Ashville?

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Posted by Deggesty on Monday, August 11, 2014 3:15 PM

daveklepper

Ashville?

In times past, there were New Orleans-Asheville sleepers--in the summer season, but this car did not go to Asheville. It did travel on a name train for the northern-most part of its trip, and the name included, along with another city name, the names of its end points.

Johnny

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 8:18 AM

The Southern's Aiken-Augusta Special?

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Posted by KCSfan on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 10:33 AM

Deggesty

In times past, there were New Orleans-Asheville sleepers--in the summer season, but this car did not go to Asheville. It did travel on a name train for the northern-most part of its trip, and the name included, along with another city name, the names of its end points.

The only connecting road at Montgomery that, to me at least, makes sense is the WRyofA. At one time there was an New York and New Orleans Ltd. that ran on the West Point Route. I'm guessing the sleeper we're looking for ran on that train between Atlanta and Montgomery and on the L&N between Montgomery and New Orleans.

Mark

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 11:13 AM

Dave, the Southern had no service between Atlanta and Augusta, so it could not have been the Aiken-Augusta Special.

Mark, the train went beyond Atlanta. Look back, and see how far it ran beyond Atlanta.

Johnny

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Posted by KCSfan on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 12:34 PM

Deggesty

Mark, the train went beyond Atlanta. Look back, and see how far it ran beyond Atlanta.

North of Atlanta the NY and NO Ltd. ran to Washington. Major intermediate cities served were Greenville, Spartanburg, Charlotte, Greensboro, Lynchburg and Charlottesville. I've not been able to find a through sleeper from New Orleans via Montgomery and the L&N to any of these cities in any of the OG's I have available.

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 4:10 PM

The Crescent had through New Orleans-Montgomery-Atlanta-New York sleepers, but it left New Orleans at night, on a schedule through to New York, taking two nights northbound. There was no train with both New York and New Orleans in its name at this time. 

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Posted by KCSfan on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:07 AM

Deggesty

The Crescent had through New Orleans-Montgomery-Atlanta-New York sleepers, but it left New Orleans at night, on a schedule through to New York, taking two nights northbound. There was no train with both New York and New Orleans in its name at this time. 

The Azalean was a morning train from New Orleans that carried a NO-Washington sleeper that was handed off to the West Point Route at Montgomery.

Mark

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Posted by KCSfan on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 7:21 AM

KCSfan

The Azalean was a morning train from New Orleans that carried a NO-Washington sleeper that was handed off to the West Point Route at Montgomery.

Mark

I think I may have earned a cigar with this answer. A further check of my 1937 OG shows that this car was carried from Atlanta to Washington in SR's No. 36, the Washington-Atlanta-New Orleans Express which satisfies the clue regarding  a train whose name included its end point cities.

Mark 

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 11:38 AM

I was working from a faulty memory when I stated that the two trains had a common terminal; the one-way train ran from New Orleans to Nashville, with (as far as I can determine) no coaches.

At this time, the Azalean did not carry any sleeper when it left New Orleans, but the interline sleeper in question has been identified. The one-way train which carried the New Orleans to Washington sleeper to Montgomery also carried the New Orleans to Cincinnati, the New Orleans to Chicago, and the Birmingham to New York sleepers up to Nashville. 

The two-way overnight sleeper that served a port city on a branch still has not been identified.  

Johnny

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