Very strange things

11646 views
315 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Very strange things
Posted by Miningman on Sunday, May 19, 2019 1:07 PM

1) Cheap rent?? 

2) Just what is going on in this poster? Firebox explosion? Very surreal. 

3) Dog faced locomotive 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 2,059 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, May 19, 2019 1:58 PM

OK now...

Picture One:  Cheap rent district all right, reminds me of the "Blues Brothers" movie.

Jake:  How often to the trains come past?

Elwood:  So often you won't notice 'em after a while!

 

Picture Two:  The fireman over-indulged in the beanery, turned the wrong way, and, well you know methane and fire just don't get along.

Picture Three:  I guess if Will Woodard was a stoner this is what the A-1 would have looked like!  

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Sunday, May 19, 2019 3:14 PM

1. Analogue to why the Flatiron Building is shaped as it is.  Someone took advantage of a cheap lot where those two elevated lines diverged, and built up to maximize the return.  Might be the stairwell (walk-up ONLY in those pre-ADA years) behind that single window.

 

2.  Isn't that a Schmidt-system high-pressure 4-6-0 with an ultimately unfortunate name from a Royal Navy ship?

A bit like that picture I posted of the Milwaukee F7 main pin failure a while back?

 

3.  This is French, and infamous in those 'ugliest locomotive' threads rail fans love. 4-6-0 which I believe was referred to as a 'Whale'.  Hands-down the worst approach to a skyline casing ever tried -- that was a mighty big candle that melted, or kitty that pooped on it, take yer pick.

The Belgians had a close runner-up in their fascinating inside-cylinder Hiawatha-style 4-4-2s, one of which survives and I believe has been made runnable so everyone has to look at it and petrify...

Note the Copper King/McKeen-esque portholes.  Bet the Europeans didn't install snazzy rotating Polaroid filters in them!

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by Miningman on Sunday, May 19, 2019 5:21 PM

Yes that is reminiscent of the Milwaukee Hudson pin failure except I'm not so sure the artist was depicting an accident! Kaboom. Fierce looking red shooting out like jets from the cab and a cloud of fire in the sky. High pressure steam 4-6-0 you say? 

The only logical choice for that building would be the transit companies own offices, or the Blues Brothers as Wayne states.  Tenets must have gone screwy after a while and that walkup looks brutal. Not sure what's going on on that roof either.

French Locomotive reminds me of a Citroen in styling somehow but cannot make a written connection. McKeen porthole windows are spiffy though in the trailing car. The whole thing would have been a bit jaw dropping to see in person. 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 2,059 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, May 19, 2019 5:57 PM

French?  That thing  is French?  The country that gave us Houdon, Rodin, Degas, Renoir, Fragonard, and Monet?  Sacre' bleu!  

It must have been a sight to see all right, along with the French peasants crossing themselves as it rolled past!  

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Sunday, May 19, 2019 6:25 PM

Half the people in that building probably looked at its existence as a godsend, keeping them from sharing a relative's bedroom or even mattress.  Land of opportunity, land of exploitation.  And near the excitement of cheap rapid transit everywhere.

I think this is '40s -- note the cut-off line at lower right; Dave Klepper will know where this is and likely the range of years it could be.  Brick well patched so far from new, but evolved to fit the elevated structures...

The businesses populating the ground floor might be familiar to someone.

Roof looks equipped with a railfan viewing platform.

 

Nord Express poster is having fun with the comet metaphor - train "going fast" with a fiery tail.  Suppose they do not know or care how real comets, or real fire boxes, work.  Nord had some of the most evocative posters, including one I turned to my own use (remember the Etoile du Nord with the star pointing to vanishing point of the track?)

 

I'm looking for details of the train -- can anyone make out if it has 'Micheline' rubber-tired bogies?  As I remember the story the Whales were put in service just before the 'Sitzkrieg' and didn't run long enough to count before the six-weeks-to-Vichy unpleasantness.  Most of it as I recall destroyed in the saturation bombing Britain and the US inflicted on the French railroads in the last half of the war - with strategic justification in their own minds, and in Churchill's case in particular a certain plaintive claim that true French railroaders supported what was being done to them... anyway, no portholes and weird steamlining for postwar France, and in under a decade no more new advanced steam at all.  Which was a shame, but look what's come out of their work with electrics.

  • Member since
    September, 2010
  • From: Parma Heights Ohio
  • 2,935 posts
Posted by Penny Trains on Sunday, May 19, 2019 7:33 PM

I find nothing strange about this locomotive.

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Sunday, May 19, 2019 9:00 PM

I have a bad feeling that someone with one of those morphing computer-graphics programs could get Raymond Loewy to look very much like the designer of this locomotive -- the dugong version of that Monty Python skit with the two front teeth.

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 2,059 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, May 20, 2019 9:24 AM

Penny Trains

I find nothing strange about this locomotive.

 

Jim Henson designed steam streamliners on the side?  I never knew...

  • Member since
    January, 2002
  • 3,764 posts
Posted by M636C on Monday, May 20, 2019 9:58 AM

 

 

I'm looking for details of the train -- can anyone make out if it has 'Micheline' rubber-tired bogies?  As I remember the story the Whales were put in service just before the 'Sitzkrieg' and didn't run long enough to count before the six-weeks-to-Vichy unpleasantness.  Most of it as I recall destroyed in the saturation bombing Britain and the US inflicted on the French railroads in the last half of the war - with strategic justification in their own minds, and in Churchill's case in particular a certain plaintive claim that true French railroaders supported what was being done to them... anyway, no portholes and weird steamlining for postwar France, and in under a decade no more new advanced steam at all.  Which was a shame, but look what's come out of their work with electrics.

You are thinking about the three post war Strasbourg expresses run by the Est Region.

This locomotive is Etat 230-800 and only this one unit was streamlined.

It was part of a class built by SACM in 1912, 230-781 to 230-800

Simple Expansion, 4 cylinders, 430x640, 2040 coupled wheels, BP 12kg/cm2

6 rebuilt in 1936 with long travel valves, ACFI feed heater,Kylchap or Kylala exhaust.

OF these, two (788 and 800) had BP raised to 14 kg/cm2

Only 230-800 had a "Huet" casing fitted in 1936, removed during WWII.

On takeover by the SNCF in 1938, the original locomotives became 230J, rebuilds became 230L.

The train:

These were described as Type allegee (lightweight)

They were constructed as an electrically welded oval tube over a frame made up of a floor structure with compartment partitions serving as annular supports with 1.5 mm steel plating completing the structure. The body was 23.26m long. The trucks are conventional equalised design with a one piece cast frame and SKF roller bearings and 920 mm monobloc wheels. The windows are fixed with small sliding ventilators at the top and are in the form of an oval. The cars have pressure ventilation and heating.

Four first class cars with eight compartments were built type A8

Three composite first/second cars, eight compartments type A3B5

Six second class cars, 9 compartments type B9

Five second class/brake cars 6 compartments type B6D

Twenty five third class cars, ten compartments type C10

Five third class brake cars, five compartments type C5D

Five third class and buffet cars, four compartments type C4S (later converted to C10)

Some of the B6D were converted to A6D by 1937. Only the brake cars had a single rounded end (illustrated above).

These cars were found to ride better than the heavier standard steel cars, partly due to the stiffer body structure. These cars weighed 35-36 tonnes compared to 45-48 tonnes for standard OCEM (Office Centrale d'Etudes Materiel) cars.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Monday, May 20, 2019 10:48 AM

Thank you so much for the correct information!

M636C
Only 230-800 had a "Huet" casing fitted in 1936, removed during WWII.

This probably deserves its own thread.  Huet had an interesting approach to reducing the mass of streamlining at the nose of a train without increasing train weight (or changing locomotive weight distribution) more than barely necessary.  This resulted in what can be seen in our 'dog-face' photo: the long face is little more than a shell, like the air deflectors on top of some truck cabs, purportedly streaming the 'airflow' around the very conventional smokebox you can see peeping out behind it.

To me, somewhat reminiscent of the technical means employed here.

(Wayne, you shouldn't experience an éternuement à café over this, as I think you've seen it before in different contexts, but be advised anyway)

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 2,059 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, May 20, 2019 3:03 PM

Caught the warning in time Mod-man!  I put down the coffee first.

Hmmm, interesting.  I don't know if that nose modification would do anything for the bus's speed, but it sure would come in handy for knocking smart-phone zombies out of the way without collateral damage to the vehicle!

  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • 1,176 posts
Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 1:07 AM

Flintlock76

OK now...

Picture One:  Cheap rent district all right, reminds me of the "Blues Brothers" movie.

Jake:  How often to the trains come past?

Elwood:  So often you won't notice 'em after a while!

This is the standard lines to take for almost every single property agents selling or leasing properties with the noise problem. Base on what my most trusted agents told me, it's actually true for some people. CoffeeSurprise

  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • 1,176 posts
Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 1:14 AM

Overmod

1. Analogue to why the Flatiron Building is shaped as it is.  Someone took advantage of a cheap lot where those two elevated lines diverged, and built up to maximize the return.  Might be the stairwell (walk-up ONLY in those pre-ADA years) behind that single window.

There is a narrow corridor behind the room with the large single window, connecting the flat behind the stairwell. I know because that rooftop is where Tomi met Liz. They went there every evening after work. Tomi was lost in the war... not a spoiler by the wayMovie 

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 2,059 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 7:29 AM

"...that rooftop is where Tomi met Liz."

I don't know who they are, but I know who these  guys are, and I'm suprised I didn't think of it sooner.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=puM1k-S86nE  

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 8:05 PM

1) Q. Ever get run over by a train? A. Oh yeah about twenty times a day.

2) This firebox seems to go on forever and holes in the driving rods and linkage. Stack in the middle? What? 

3) This has to be a Gresley... right?? .. and the tracks off the turntable go the wrong way!

4) Big wheels, little wheels, big porch, I don't know what's connected to what.

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 9:12 PM

Oh my you pick well-known strange things.

2 is an example of one of the most famous locomotives in the world - the Algerian Garratts.  No holes in the side rods; that's the 'salmon' eccentric rod to the Cossart drop-valve gear (the other rod with lightening holes is part of the gear too.  That arrangement was intended to swing exactly opposite the mains and side rods to reduce necessary overbalance and augment... the astute will have figured what has to be added to the valve gear linkage to make this work at the valves.

3 is another famous thing, the only 4-6-2-2 in the world.  The number gives it away: the revised Gresley 'hush-hush' high-pressure locomotive (all too soon, yet none too soon rebuilt but keeping its unusual trailing-wheel arrangement...)

4 was actually very successful over a long (for its era) working life.  Built for one of the Paris 'ceinture' (belt, just as in America) lines around the time of the American Civil War, by the du Bousquet who was half of the most famous compound locomotive type name up to Chapelon (even if the other guy got more railfan cred a la those contemptible folk who just say 'Rolls' for a Rolls-Royce.)

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, May 21, 2019 11:12 PM

Well thank you Overmod. Ok, I can see that #2 is a Garratt now that you point it out, sort of anyway. Suppose it's the angle of the shot. 

On the Gresley what is that where the stack would be? Where is the steam exhaust coming from?.. that little circular hole to the right? I don't get it. 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 11:18 AM

Miningman

Well thank you Overmod. Ok, I can see that #2 is a Garrett now that you point it out, sort of anyway. Suppose it's the angle of the shot.

It's GARRATT.  Don't ever, ever spell it any other way.  ANY other way. 

On the Gresley what is that where the stack would be?

Best if you go to one of the primary references for the locomotive and look at the delightfully perverted steam and combustion-gas arrangements.  I believe Douglas Self is a reasonable entry point.  There is at least one book devoted to the locomotive (which I regrettably haven't read yet, and I can't give you the cites for).

The last great squeal of the 'thermodynamic revolution' of the 1920s, which gave us ponderous Super-Power from Lima (culminating in the central machinery 2-12-6), three cylinders from Alco, weird watertube arrangements and impossibly fragile Italian poppet valves from Baldwin, and -- [insert phrase as desired] eight-coupled freight power from D&H.

Where is the steam exhaust coming from?.. that little circular hole to the right? I don't get it.

I thought it was a bleed from some part of the feedwater-heat train.  Unlikely you can tell for sure except on a view with the shrouding removed, or with reference to blueprints or drawings.  It is assuredly NOT a safety valve, even if things with the steam generation were even more pathetic than it seems, at times, they could be.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 11:21 AM

Miningman

Well thank you Overmod. Ok, I can see that #2 is a Garrett now that you point it out, sort of anyway. Suppose it's the angle of the shot.

It's GARRATT.  Don't ever, ever spell it any other way.  ANY other way.  Pleeeeeeease??  With sugar on top??

On the Gresley what is that where the stack would be?

Best if you go to one of the primary references for the locomotive and look at the delightfully perverted steam and combustion-gas arrangements.  That IS the stack; this was the era before Kylchap, multiple nozzles, and low back pressure were likely considered design advantages in their own right, and 'economical' locomotives would have presumably small and economical chimneys that economically pinched pennies on the fuel and water bill.  [/sarc]

That little thing sticking up is the whistle, I think where the P2 has it on the very similar "smoke-lifting" casing arrangement.  Note that the streamlined 4-6-2s have a chime whistle in that spot, a vast improvement over most anything else in Blighty.

I believe Douglas Self is a reasonable entry point for learning what Gresley & Co. were trying to do with this design.  There is at least one book devoted to the locomotive (which I regrettably haven't read yet, and I can't give you the cites for).

Consider this locomotive the last great squeal of the 'thermodynamic revolution' of the 1920s, which gave us ponderous Super-Power from Lima (culminating in the central machinery 2-12-6), three cylinders from Alco, weird watertube arrangements and impossibly fragile Italian poppet valves from Baldwin, and -- [insert phrase as desired] eight-coupled freight power from D&H.

Where is the steam exhaust coming from?.. that little circular hole to the right? I don't get it.

I thought it was a bleed from some part of the feedwater-heat train.  Unlikely you can tell for sure except on a view with the shrouding removed, or with reference to blueprints or drawings.  It is assuredly NOT a safety valve, even if things with the steam generation were even more pathetic than it seems, at times, they could be.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 8:32 PM

Alright I fixed It! Don't yell at me I'm still not well! 

I have a 1st year student named Garrett and not a day goes by I don't enter his name somewhere on this iPad even if it's just for attendance. So our friend SIRI who is da boss fixes things on me mostly when I'm not looking. Been in some dandy tug of wars with her. 

There have been several occasions when I happen to have gently brushed her recording function without being aware and suddenly a minute of Tucker Carlson's show or a hockey game play by play starts popping up on the screen. 

One has to pay attention but I do like the ' turn on the flashlight' command and bingo it's on. 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by Miningman on Monday, May 27, 2019 11:19 PM

1) Was this the inspiration or even the stolen plagerized idea for the Daleks?

2) Are these people too small or is the locomotive too big? 

3) Not a HSR route despite its European location. In any case this is dangerous and not a good idea at all. Door to door passenger service, right to your own home!

1) 

 

2) 

 

3) 

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 8,464 posts
Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 8:53 AM

(1) and (2) are almost certainly different photographic effects.

(1) is, I think, taken with a fisheye-like lens (perhaps a 28mm or even 24mm) that is distorting what appears to be a parabolic motor-train front end -- what is this, a Russian clone of a Lyntog?  In my opinion worth preserving in better shape than we see.  And yes, if you had that view of it at a grade crossing, "Eliminate!" might be the thing it did in the next half-second...

(2) almost certainly is a trick photograph, since that is probably a C&NW H class and the intent is to make it look truly "Zeppelin" sized.  (They missed a sure bet, though, by not having the 'ground crew' hold simulated static lines and pretend like they're keeping it grounded while servicing...)

(3) is another of those fascinating European cheek-by-jowl services that keep residents looking both ways as they step out their doors 'or else'!  We've seen some other pictures with trains in very unexpected places ... including crossing airport runways or soccer fields with games being played on them.  I blame the relative lack of scheister lawyers.

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 2,059 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 9:30 AM

Number three looks familiar.

If it's what I think it is Jim Wrinn did an article in "Trains" about it several years ago.  It might be the steam narrow-gauge street running railroad in Germany that's up by the Baltic somewhere in the former DDR.  If memory serves it's not completely an in-town railroad, but runs up to the Baltic beaches.  

OK, I think  this might be it...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molli_railway  

  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • 1,176 posts
Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 10:30 AM

CoffeeSmile, Wink & Grin (Giggling with Gille's orange crisp biscuits in my mouth) 

The first one is an abandoned NMBS (National Railway Company of Belgium) type 620 diesel railcar: https://xact4u.homestead.com/ijzerenweg/MW/620/620.HTML . The most interesting thing about this railcar, for me, is that digital media like  "boredpanda" wrongly indicate this as an "Abandoned Orient Express Train" and people copy and paste this fake news on various website.

This railcar really reminds me of the streamlined railcar of the Soviet Union: http://www.dieselpunks.org/profiles/blogs/sunday-streamline-45-baltic-diesels It also appeared in a set of four stamps (or six) from USSR which I still have them in my stamp collection. 

Collecting stamp with steam locomotive on it used to be one of my hobbies as well as a channel to understand the railroading world, I believe (because I can't remember) the first I knew about steam locomotive was from my father's stamp collection which 90% of stamps he collected was actually removed from envelope. Many of his most valuable stamps were lost during a family power struggle. I remember I recorded and drew the whole drama in the form of a set of 4 stamps like newspaper comic.

The larger version of the second picture Miningman posted could be found by searching "May 1943. Clinton, Iowa. “Women wipers of the Chicago & North Western Railroad going out to work on an engine at the roundhouse. (via Shorpy Historical Photo Archive)". Overmod is right that it was a C&NW H class, one of my favorites 4-8-4s of North America. I don't have time to verify it but it seems to me that the picture belongs to a set of photos taken during WWII when women took on railway roles due to "manpower" shortage. I think the related media picked the shortest woman for the shots for an obvious reason so that the smaller version of this photo does look like a trick photograph. 

 https://www.shorpy.com/search/node/May+1943.+Clinton%2C+Iowa 

I believe Wayne is right about #3.

https://www.berlin.de/ 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 11:30 AM

Re 3) It's steam too! The folks on those 2nd floors with all the windows must get quite the emissions and aromatherapy session.  

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 4,769 posts
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, June 01, 2019 1:25 AM

Only a single entry this time but it's a doozy. Looks like something from Star Wars or WWII on the bad guys side. 

Comes with explanation.   (R & S is Roberval and Saugenay) Arvida, Quebec

Rio Tinto Alcan Bauxite and Alumina. A rather bizarre unit that has escaped everyone as it is hidden deep within Arvida.
It was acquired from Germany in 1982 or 1983 when the new calcining furnace for alumina was built using German technology. It came with the technology package. It apparently is a B-B arrangement with a diesel mechanical or hydraulic drive. The unit is remote controlled and has a coupler only at the rear end. It is used for moving cuts of empty 
covered hoppers from the R & S yard tracks into the car loader and then moving the loaded cars of alumina to the 
adjacent yard tracks for the R & S to lift. With a coupler at only one end it is always operating at the same end of the yard. Roberval & Saugenay does the maintenance. Arvida, QC May 12, 2010 Ian Stronach

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 2,059 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, June 01, 2019 10:14 AM

Yeah, it's German all right.

Check this out and you'll see the family resemblance...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztkKJUQB4rU  

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • 4,290 posts
Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, June 01, 2019 8:46 PM

Is the Alcan switcher shrouded against getting to close to the furnace, or is it to shed abrasive or flammable dust, or something else?

  • Member since
    January, 2002
  • 3,764 posts
Posted by M636C on Sunday, June 02, 2019 6:00 AM

Miningman

 

3) This has to be a Gresley... right?? .. and the tracks off the turntable go the wrong way!

 

The best source for data on this locomotive is the twenty or so volume series on "Locomotives of the LNER" published some years ago by the Railway Correspondence and Travel Society. I'm still in the wrong city to look these up. Another worthwhile book (that Overmod should have) is O.S Nock's "The British Steam Railway Locomotive 1925-1965" which has TWO gatefold drawings of LNER 10 000 which should provide adequate detail for anybody.  The boiler was basically an Admiralty three drum water tube boiler with a conventional rear section and a narrow forward section to fit between the driving wheels. It was a four cylinder compound.

Because the locomotive filled up the loading gauge there were a number of experiments with the stack arrangement. Initially it ended flush with the sloping air duct above the smokebox. In the photo above there was a single stack. It finally had a double Kylchap. It wasn't a success and was rebuilt into something that looked like an A4 but with a longer (50 sq ft) grate and three simple cylinders.

Peter

SUBSCRIBER & MEMBER LOGIN

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

FREE NEWSLETTER SIGNUP

Get the Classic Trains twice-monthly newsletter