Very strange things

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, July 9, 2020 1:23 PM

Miningman

1)  Irony? A Safety message involving a caboose 60 feet above your head! Does one not need a permit for something like this?  

In any case it's striking! Edmonton, Alberta.

That's been up there for probably 30 years now.  I still drive by it on a regular basis, on both rubber and steel wheels.

It's located here:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/53%C2%B031'31.2%22N+113%C2%B022'43.5%22W/@53.525335,-113.3796638,198m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d53.5253348!4d-113.3787434

Technically it is in Strathcona County, as it is just outside Edmonton's legal city limits. 

It's more than just eye candy, that place is a safety training and research centre.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, July 9, 2020 12:43 PM

1)  Irony? A Safety message involving a caboose 60 feet above your head! Does one not need a permit for something like this?  

In any case it's striking! Edmonton, Alberta.

 

2)  More risky business. Must have some kind of fail safe thing in place. 

 

3)  That's a lot of levels along the roof line. The 'Peacemaker' .. I'm told it's based on a Volkswagen! ??

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 9:40 PM

That 2035 "Blockbuster" (first picture) Becky's got is so impressive I've gotta get one too!  Haven't run into a decent one yet, but I'm patient!  I can wait.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 7:51 PM

daveklepper

Just what in the World prompted Lionel to put a four-wheel trailing truck on a locomotive that would have closer to many North American prototypes with a two=wheel trailing truck?   But they did build them well!

 

The 4 wheel trailing trucks were just a simple sheet metal design as on this 2035:

They were cheaper and easier to manufacture (so say the history books) than the cast 2 wheel truck used on locos manufactured before 1942 and immediately after toy production resumed in 1945:

Here's a 2025 with the 2-wheel truck which was made from a modified 224 type boiler:

Replacing the truck allowed Lionel to label a loco as "new".  Notice also that my 2035 (top) lacks the fancy driver rims of the earlier 2025.  That was a neccessary modification to give the K type pseudo pacifics Magnetraction.

But yes.  The Lionel Lines was the king of 2-4-2's and 2-6-4's!  Wink

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 1:10 PM

Overmod

As an honorary Canadian, I am further honored.

Eight years of Obama, and still no Cohibas here.  Now coming up on years of the big blue House, and not even a shred of interest in Cohibas here.  Go ahead and rub it in.  If we can trade happily with the Communist regime in Vietnam, we could assuredly do so in geriatric Cuba. 

You should take a trip down there using your Canadian status one day.

Maybe bring back a pair of EMD standard gauge export A1A trucks while you're at it.... ...could probably hide plenty of Cohibas in their crate as well!

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 12:54 PM

daveklepper
Just what in the World prompted Lionel to put a four-wheel trailing truck on a locomotive that would have closer to many North American prototypes with a two=wheel trailing truck?

Isn't it related to the Berkshire that has the same delightful Baldwin Disc driver representation?  Only able to negotiate tighter curves?

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 12:52 PM

As an honorary Canadian, I am further honored.

Eight years of Obama, and still no Cohibas here.  Now coming up on years of the big blue House, and not even a shred of interest in Cohibas here.  Go ahead and rub it in.  If we can trade happily with the Communist regime in Vietnam, we could assuredly do so in geriatric Cuba.  

(In the other hand, I still haven't forgiven them for getting the Russians to give arming codes directly to field commanders... Whistling)

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 12:51 PM

I confess that I always thought of the NW4s as being early versions of the NW5s (they were only 100hp apart) with the same logic in preserving the end-cab that the FM H20-44s would use.  Of course in those days MoPac still ran long, heavy steam-heated trains to lots of places, which would keep those two busy until long after EMD wised up to what actual secondary-service traffic would need...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 12:40 PM

David, I have no idea why Lionel used that wheel configuration!  No-one else seems to know either!  The first version came out pre-war, I don't remember the model number but I was lucky enough to handle one and it was a beast!  Weighed at least four pounds!  In effect it was kind of a lower-priced variant of the scale 700E Hudson.   

The 2018 I linked isn't quite that heavy, but it pulls well just the same!

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 9:41 AM

Just what in the World prompted Lionel to put a four-wheel trailing truck on a locomotive that would have closer to many North American prototypes with a two=wheel trailing truck?   But they did build them well!

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 8:31 AM

Overmod
And while we are on the subject of world-famous designs, the Golsdorf 2-6-4 is surely in that category, a full and long-lived success and one of the last, if not indeed the last, design of that famous designer.

Actually, the most successful 2-6-4 design wasn't built by Golsdorf, it was built by Lionel!  Looky...

http://www.postwarlionel.com/motive-power/steam/prairie/2018-prairie/  

One of Lionel's variations on the theme. They made thousands of 'em!

I've got one, a great little puller, and it runs just as strong as the day it was made 60 years ago!

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 1:42 AM

Eric_Mag:  Hate to burst your bubble but you are way off. I was hoping someone would follow through with the location and I suppose I should have included it with the pic but then it would detract from the whole mystic meaning. I'm rather surprised no one did come forward.

...so ..  This is in the vast moorlands of Devon county in SW England at Dartmoor National Park and that is in the Okehampton Firing Range now part of the park. That is the target railway shed, a part of the target railway in place including gun emplacements, steel targets and various aspects of targeting railway structures. Interesting eh? 

Don't tell Flintlock/Wayne or he will be running around all over the place having a ball taking out railway infrastructure. 

You can almost hear the hounds of the Baskervilles and see Sherlock Holmes about. 

Plenty of good pics on their website. 

Overmod-- The Bull Moose! Cohiba for you. May Smarties and ice be upon you. 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 6, 2020 11:41 PM

#1 -- there's more of interest than the offset doghouse.  That is a 'Bull Moose' 2-8-8-0, I think from the 1925 order, probably after it was converted to a simple articulated (!) -- it is a ROAD locomotive, not a hump or local engine, and was used over Sherman Hill until the 1950s.  The four-wheel trucks indicate 'helper service' which probably explains something about the doghouse position outboard.

That Argentine locomotive is perhaps the most famous 4-8-0 ever built: Porta's first, a 'pull-out-the-stops' design that is still one of the most efficient designs built.  It actually survives, in severely dilapidated form, and a number of us on steam_tech put together an effort to save and restore it -- which foundered BADLY on the rocks of dog-in-the-manger 'national treasure' policy.  It deserves far better.

And while we are on the subject of world-famous designs, the Golsdorf 2-6-4 is surely in that category, a full and long-lived success and one of the last, if not indeed the last, design of that famous designer.  There are reasons ... good engineering reasons! -- for what look like strange proportions and odd features.  (There is a Krauss-Helmholtz bogie on the front, so the engine 'guides' like a 4-4-4)

One of these was actually restored to operation (in fact, I think the picture shows the restored example)...

Am I the only one who thinks of Sigi Strasser when I look at the 'gamer special' with the upper-half drivers?  And who remembers the 'designer' (Colani?) engine with the drivers banked for high speed like the wheels on a racing wheelchair? (Designed for the then-abuilding BAM in Siberia at the end of the 1970s)

Here's a strange thing for Penny:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpSlht21WI4

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Monday, July 6, 2020 11:33 PM

Miningman

2)  Railroad of the Mystics. The door opens to Space Time. Cannot reveal the location. Not yet. Someday.

 

I think that's the Nevada Norther enginehouse in Cobre Nevada. The NNRR line between Shafter (former WP, now UP interchange) and Cobre (SP interchange) was torn up ca 1990.

Definitely a spot out in the middle of nowhere.

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Posted by M636C on Monday, July 6, 2020 10:12 PM

3) Presidente Peron, later Argentina design by LD Porta. A bit striking in all that streamlining and white finish.

 

This was a rebuild from a metre gauge Pacific following Chapelon's work converting Paris Orleans 4500 series Pacifics to 4700 (240A) and 240P class 4-8-0s.

So the diameter of the boiler was inherited from the locomotive rebuilt.

Peter

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Posted by scilover on Monday, July 6, 2020 9:46 PM

M636C

2)  Bizzaro World Locomotive. Steam? Diesel? Electric? Yes! 

Woah, I had to make a double take there when I saw this picture hahaha. I wonder why they made that decision to paint that....

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, July 6, 2020 9:43 PM

Peter-- Wow! Great post. Now that's a Pacific!! What a handsome locomotive, it would look great on the Canadian Pacific or the Pennsy. 

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Posted by M636C on Monday, July 6, 2020 9:39 PM

2)  Bizzaro World Locomotive. Steam? Diesel? Electric? Yes! 

 The lettering appears to read "125 Jahre Eisenbahn"

The actual steam locomotive (a kkstb Class 310) looks like:

In the limited space on the body of the Taurus locomotive, the artist has tried to include some critical images.

Peter

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, July 6, 2020 9:14 PM

The Porta engine reminds me of a T1.  But look at the knuckle!

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, July 6, 2020 8:50 PM

Oooooo, some goodies here!

Photo 1)  Talk about a deluxe doghouse!  That one puts anything the mighty PRR had on their "coast-to-coast" tenders to shame!  I wouldn't be surprised if there was a fridge and a hot-plate in there!

Photo 2)  Just goes to show you, "Steam Lives!"  Sort of.

Photo 3)  Was Maestro  Porta a hot dog fanatic?  The boiler on that thing reminds me of a hot dog sitting on a bun!  Maybe there's a side of fries and a beer in the tender?

Hey, we all like hot dogs, don't we?  

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, July 6, 2020 8:24 PM

1)  Doghouse on a Vanderbilt tender.  Now if we had one of these today you could sell raffle tickets for $200 bucks apiece to railfans to get the seat! You bet! 

 

2)  Bizzaro World Locomotive. Steam? Diesel? Electric? Yes! 

 

3) Presidente Peron, later Argentina design by LD Porta. A bit striking in all that streamlining and white finish.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, June 27, 2020 9:31 PM

Number Three looks like the "Rustoleum Special."  Yikes!

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Posted by Deggesty on Saturday, June 27, 2020 7:43 PM

rcdrye

1) if those are FTs then that's likely taken at NYC's 61st st facility in Chicago, in which case RI FT's make sense.

2) in MofW red, thats an ex-SP&S F7 (805) that was returned to fright service in 1974 during a business upturn.  No one bothered to repaint it to green.

3) see (2) since the rotary is at the other end of the string...

4) 1604/1605 is NYC's lone set of F2s in the original F-unit paint scheme.  The FTs carried the same paint when new.

 

Yes, No. 2 is frightening, so it is proper to use it in fright service. Big Smile

Johnny

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, June 27, 2020 4:48 PM

1) if those are FTs then that's likely taken at NYC's 61st st facility in Chicago, in which case RI FT's make sense.

2) in MofW red, thats an ex-SP&S F7 (805) that was returned to fright service in 1974 during a business upturn.  No one bothered to repaint it to green.

3) see (2) since the rotary is at the other end of the string...

4) 1604/1605 is NYC's lone set of F2s in the original F-unit paint scheme.  The FTs carried the same paint when new.

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, June 27, 2020 4:07 PM

1) Ok so the Mercury looked like the Empire State Express for a while. Now where the heck are we here?  What is that in the background on the higher elevation tracks to the right?  Looks like FT's? No? This is a strange photo!

 

2)  A red Burlington Northern F unit. If you put this on your layout you need to defend yourself!  Keep a copy photo in your pocket.

 

3)  If you want to continue to go all wonky with BN stuff then this is a must.

 

4)  So what do we have here? Some kind of intermediate paint scheme of abbreviated lightning stripes but not quite a cigar band. Not too crazy about it.

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, June 27, 2020 2:37 PM

Overmod
By the Seventies even the cheapest B-pictures could be processed and distributed in color .

Reminds me of Mel Brook's "Young Frankenstein."  When Mel was preparing to do the movie he planned on shooting it in black and white in the spirit of those old Universal horror films.  He figured it would be cheaper too.

He got a hell of a shock when he found out the black and white film stock would have to be specially made and would cost more  than color stock!  No-one used B&W anymore!  

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, June 27, 2020 2:30 PM

Gee, as a little boy I always  thought the Captain looked old!

Of course, the long the show was on the less "old" makeup he needed.  Didn't need the grey wig anymore either. 

Well, we Boomers will never forget him!  Or Mr. Green Jeans, Mr. Moose, Bunny Rabbit, Grandfather Clock.  A wonderful little world. 

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, June 27, 2020 1:53 PM

Good good, thank you for the (sad) info. Oh yeah the ping pong balls which you just knew were coming and despite shouting at the tv with the warning fell on the unsuspecting Captain. 

29 years and over 6,000 episodes. Not bad.

Ok...'57, '58, early grade school years, Captain Kangaroo is on, I always sat crossed legs Buddha style right in front of the tv, my dad is getting washed and dressed for work but listens intently from other rooms, laughs a lot and throws out some comments, steam locomotives are a block away, lots of whistling.. lots! chugging, switching, thru trains Limiteds, locals and manifests, water and coaling towers, icing reefers, that's the ambient background noise. 

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, June 27, 2020 12:44 PM

Miningman
The show had a nice pace to it and good comedy. There must be something? No?

When I first went out to LA in the '90s one of the first things I did was join the Museum of Broadcasting to get full access to their library, which has a great many archives of television.  That was where I was first made aware of the awful downside of the Ampex videotape revolution.

There are a few kinescopes of parts of the show, some of them shot 'off air' with the various artifacts you'd expect from NTSC broadcast quality.  That is all that remains, with the likelihood that any 'hidden tapes' will be retrieved dwindling with every additional year of self-magnetizing (and presumably acetate deterioration).  Nitrate film issues are bad enough, but there are techniques to recover and reconstruct frame-by-frame even severely deteriorated material.  That's not really practical with most types of degraded magnetic tape.

Here's a bit of the flavor, although this is from a much later era (you won't be shocked at how old the Captrain's become if you didn't remember him from the early '60s):

Of course, production was repeatedly shot with the same magazines of tape -- you'd be surprised at how heavy an hour's worth of 2" run at broadcast speed is, and how much that cost.

I think this was right at the beginning of interest in syndication of kid's shows, which at the very least would produce 16mm frame-transfer versions.  But it was also right on the cusp of widespread color programming, which was noted of a paradigm shift in broadcasting than I think many people appreciate.

One of the great earthquake 'singularities' in life changes was something I hadn't been expecting, but should have.  The thing that made Walter Annenberg rich was that Google of the Fifties, TV Guide magazine.  In its listings a color broadcast was indicated by a little C icon in a TV-screen-shaped outline, and in the mid-Sixties that meant a real big-budget production.  One day I picked up a copy and found the convention had been switched to "BW" ... and I knew the world of my childhood was ended forever.

There was a parallel shift in filmmaking.  Many early-Sixties films were famously, and elegantly, shot in black-and-white; the whole genre of 'film noir' hinges on it.  By the Seventies even the cheapest B-pictures could be processed and distributed in color ... perhaps as has been said to compete with the perceived threat of color TV on larger and larger (this is a very ironic interpretation of 'larger' by jaded modern standards!) ... and B&W became a nostalgia medium nearly immediately.

This was true of commercials and graphic design, too.  Quite a bit of very great ingenuity and talent was used in design and production of material with 'punch' in black and white.  This became particularly notable in the 'modern' Sixties, after about 1963, but very little survived even in the early '70s, and while the 'French ad' boom brought back some of the idea, there is comparatively little ingenious spare design since ... which is a shame.

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