Very strange things

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, June 27, 2019 7:27 AM

The PA's were used in freight service, but both the DL-109s and PAs saw freight service only between Ceder Hill ancd Boston on the Shore Line, not to Maybrooik over the Poughkeepsie Bridge, except on rare occasions.

Somehow, on the New Haven, the PAs seemed more reliable than elsewhere and were the 1st line Shore Line passenger power east of New Haven until the FL-9s arrived.  Two units regularly handled the Merchant Boston Switch and Route 128 at a continuous 100mph except for excelleration and braking.  But that was the only stretch where such speed was permitted in my recollection.  And the I-5s had done as well, but straight through to, Readville since the 128 station came later.

Here is a view from that cheap-rent large-window apartment.  The 6th is on the left, the 9th on the right.  What looks like another el line in the background is a glass-walled bridge between two buildings of the same owner.

 

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, June 27, 2019 9:48 AM

David, if what I've read is correct the New Haven got good service from all their ALCO diesels of whatever model.  It's been said that since the New Haven was an all-ALCO 'road they understood the ALCO product line better than the other 'roads and knew how to maintain them properly. 

At least that's what I've read.  Certainly I wasn't there at the time!

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Posted by MidlandMike on Thursday, June 27, 2019 10:56 PM

daveklepper
The PA's were used in freight service, but both the DL-109s and PAs saw freight service only between Ceder Hill ancd Boston on the Shore Line, not to Maybrooik over the Poughkeepsie Bridge, except on rare occasions.

For those who might not know, the Maybrook line had a significant grade over the Taconic Mts. in eastern NY.  Alco FA's and RS's were used on that line (after the NH's 2-10-2 's)

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, July 6, 2019 12:51 PM

1) Ok what's with artists depicting fire with steam locomotives? Here we have the 20th Century plowing through a forest fire. Didn't that happen at least once a week? 

2) Ok I don't think this one is photoshopped. Do not see any flower power and peace stickers. Trying to make up for my earlier 'being duped'

3) When a steam locomotive turns bad.

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Saturday, July 6, 2019 1:02 PM

It was quite common for coal-burners to start trackside fires with cinders ejected from the stack.  There is even a specific whistle signal to warn the track forces of fire on or near the track (ooo ooo).

But after the first few fires there wouldn't have been much forest left to burn, so the rest would probably have been grass fires. 

That van looks like the ultimate 60s high-rail...

And if you think that armoured gun is bad, check this out:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5e/Hitler-gustav-railway-gun.jpg

Speer is at the far right of the photo, with Hitler to his left.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, July 6, 2019 1:40 PM

Yeah but the Gustov was not a steam locomotive.

Monument to insanity, they blew it up destroying it one day before capture. Fine, happy ending. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, July 6, 2019 2:32 PM

Interesting stuff.

That "Dreyfuss through the flaming forest."  OK, I can understand artistic license for a dramatic effect, but that's a bit over the top!  Cool other wise though.

That VW Mini-bus on rails?  I guess it's legit.  There's no rails into Woodstock (I think) and anyway there's no "wacky-tabaccy" smoke coming out the windows.  Cheech Marin and Tommy Chong don't seem to be in the area either.

Picture three. Fictional I suppose.  Reminds me of the fact that of all man's inventions the steam locomotive is one of the very few that's never allowed itself to be sucessfully perverted into a weapon.  Haul weapons yes, be one, no.

That German mega-cannon.  There were TWO of them, "Gustav" and "Dora."  They had 31.5 inch bores and fired a 4.75 ton shell 23 miles.  It took several trains to move the things and a battalion of troops nearly three weeks to assemble them when they got to their destinations.  "Gustav" was used in the siege of Sebastopol, "Dora" went to the Leningrad front but arrived too late to be used, so was withdrawn.  Both were scrapped, but some components were found at the end of the war.  Too much gun.

Anyway, WW2 was the end of the trail for railroad guns.  There was nothing they could do that couldn't be done by tactical air, and with greater versatility too. 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, July 6, 2019 5:11 PM
Wonderful.
 

Thank You.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Sunday, July 7, 2019 2:30 AM

Miningman

2) Ok I don't think this one is photoshopped. Do not see any flower power and peace stickers. Trying to make up for my earlier 'being duped'

I love the idea of this post. This is a Volkswagen Rail Bus inspection car (of LIRR?).

Big and fast enough to be used as a commuter for smaller towns... 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=volkswagen+long+island+railroad&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwilxL_1mqLjAhUJvbwKHaBiD-kQ_AUIEigD&biw=1920&bih=937

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, July 7, 2019 3:00 PM

The Long Island Railroad .. How about that!

1) Not sure this qualifies as a very strange thing but it sure would today. That's some S curve and way up there. What a sight to see in the Big Apple, a Forney and a string of coaches looking like a roller coaster ride. Open windows too! Never ever get away with this today.

2) Customer-- I'd like one discount fare to Berlin please

    Agent-- Yes sir, oh you're lucky, it's the last one on this train

3) Getting the gals involved in wartime propaganda otherwise little comment on this outside of its sinister origins 

4) Those clever Germans came up with a way for freight to load itself.

5) New York Central X5313. Holds water, has a door and windows and built in classification lights. Must be a converted tender. 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, July 7, 2019 7:42 PM

That's a converted tender all right, but I'm scratching my head as to what purpose.

The NYO&W converted some of it's old tenders into heater cars for passenger trains pulled by F3's without steam generators, but I don't think that's the case with that NYC tender.

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, July 7, 2019 8:14 PM

Here's a top view.  NYC used steam generator cars with R-2 electrics, and had them available in case freight power was used on passenger trains.  From what I can find out about it, it was used by the TH&B after the 5313 was transferred there and then retired.  The tender has two steam generators.

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_3wvT74x-2Us/SSBg94YfRKI/AAAAAAAABNo/fTlTNoM-3z0/s1600-h/NYC+X5313.jpg 

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, July 7, 2019 8:36 PM

That's a great picture rcdrye.. TH&B is correct as the fuzzy pic I put up came from a TH&B fan. One thing is for sure, the New York Central went through a lot of expense and trouble to ensure their passenger service was always up to snuff. I suppose it could always be useful in MOW service as well. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, July 8, 2019 7:44 PM

So that was a heater car!  Interesting, I had no idea the NYC used them.

Here's a shot of a New York, Ontario & Western heater car, tucked in behind an F3, plus an article containing more than you'd ever want to know about 'em!

http://www.nyow.org/heater_car.pdf  

The "Old and Weary" still has a fanatical fan base!

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Posted by AgentKid on Monday, July 8, 2019 7:47 PM

Miningman
New York Central X5313. Holds water, has a door and windows and built in classification lights. Must be a converted tender.

Miningman, I've thought about this various times over the years but I think you might be close enough to get a picture of an unusual piece of equipment that was used near you back in the day.

A little background, way back when, station agents negotiated a deal with the CPR that the company would provide heat, light, and water, originaly in the form of coal, kersene or coal oil, and water. Stations where the local water was either not available, or very poor, had drinking water brought to them in OCS tank cars. Usually former oil tank cars of very early 20th Century vintage. I will now copy a post I made 8 years ago

AgentKid
It Has Been A Very Long Time Coming

I received a copy of the Morning Sun published book "Canadian Pacific in Color: Volume 2, Western Lines" earlier today. On page 59 there is a photo of NB Train 67 at Keoma, AB, taken in August 1968. Keoma is the next Station south of Irricana, and this would have been 3 years after we left Irricana and two years after the Mixed Train service had been discontinued. Unbelievably, to me at least, the water car we received our drinking water from is hooked up behind the GP9. I have seen a number of photo's of CP water cars used as Auxiliary Water Car's behind branchline steam locos, or Water Cars used in MOW Service, but this is the ONLY photo I have ever seen where the hose that ran from the tank car into the stations or section houses is intact and riding on the side of the car. I had pretty much resigned myself to never seeing a picture of that again.

Now to get to the picture I think you may know where to find. The CPR built a one of a kind water car at Prince Albert, SK. They took a Dominion Boxcar (wood outside braced), removed the roof, and inserted one of the early oil tanks. They put the roof back on, added man doors and hatches for the connections to fill and unload the water, and provide a way to have hoses come out either side to reach the stations. The reason they did this is it gets cold there in winter, so they installed a caboose heater. A real good example of can-do, make-do attitude.

I have one picture of it in a book I can't find and I'm hoping you might know someone who might know where to find a picture.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, July 8, 2019 10:27 PM

See what I can do Bruce. Luv these kind of stories. Amazing the amount of responsibility and trouble the railroads of those times did to make it all work. Contrast with today's world. Must have been a tough go at times.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 9, 2019 5:15 PM

Mike weighs in.

There's only one Irricana on earth, therefore totally easy to Google, but forget about finding a more recent photo of the CPR station, with or without the water car.

View of the main street of the village of Irricana, looking west toward the Canadian Pacific Railway station, ca 1910
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, July 9, 2019 6:32 PM

 

 

 

View of the main street of the village of Irricana, looking west toward the Canadian Pacific Railway station, ca 1910
 
 
The Main Street is so wide in these towns, with the Station at the far end, as it should be,  so that wagons with four 4 or six 6 horse teams could turn around.
 
In modern times it makes it nice for nose-in angle parking, which increases spaces, AND Parking Meters!
 
Thank You.

 

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 9, 2019 6:53 PM

Yeah you could hold chuckwagon races out there! Calgary Stampede on right now. 

On the other end of the spectrum, about that S-Curve, aka 'Suicide Curve' in the Big Apple.

110th Street Curve 
 
Make sure you watch the video.. incredible really!

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Posted by AgentKid on Tuesday, July 9, 2019 9:24 PM

Miningman
There's only one Irricana on earth, therefore totally easy to Google

Thanks Mike and Vince,

That photo was taken within the the first year the station was built, by an intinerant photographer who took similar pictures of many small towns, and sold the photos to buisinesses to help them generate publicity.

The photo was displayed in various places by the time we got there in 1956. The most prominent place it was displayed was in the telephone exchange office, because the town operator was a teenager who already lived in town when the picture was taken and could remember what our yard looked like before trees and a hedge were put in.

I was going to mention her and the exchange when we were talking about hand cranked telephones over on String Lining a few months ago. Only a few years after this photo was taken, she became the original phone operator and held the job until 1964, when we got dial telephones. She lived in the exchange building so was able to provide 24/7 service, except when she would arrange for a trusted associate to cover for her when she needed time off. She apparently knew all things that could be known about town after serving in the job for so long.

Here is the funny part, the town of Irricana and other local towns were listed as seperate sections of the Calgary telephone book. Because it was a hand crank system, here is how the station was actually listed in the book:

Canadian Pacific Railway . . . . . . . 7

In town you cranked your phone and when she said "Number please?", you asked for "7"! Or, "the CPR station", or "Ken, or Shelia M****" or any similar phrase. From anywhere else you called your local operator and asked for "Irricana 7", and your operator would talk to as many other operators as nessecary, until our operator was called and she would ring the station.

In the age of Google "Irricana" is easy to find, because it is a made up name, a contraction of Irrigation Canal, named for a project that never came to fruitition.

Thanks for posting the picture.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 9, 2019 10:58 PM

Irrigation Canal.. how about that. That's a long time as a telephone exchange operator. Great story. The mighty Canadian Pacific Railway ..dial 7 ! Not that long ago really. 

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 12:40 AM

Agent Kid (Bruce), SD70Dude (Bob), cx500 ( John) any of you going to the Calgary Stampede? Greatest outdoor show in the world! 

Hey am I the only fella on the Forum in Saskatchewan? What up with that? Maybe on the Modelling sites?, I don't do those, have to draw the line somewhere. 

I like the Heritage Park TV ad.. 'escape today'  Steam Rules!!

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 4:25 AM
 
 
Switch Lamps lonely beacons in the dark far back in the Mountains, Locomotive Whistles echoing afar down the valley, Coyotes answering the Reply, the Northern Lights coruscating above.
 Coyotes answering in Reply.
 
Memories.
 
 Thank You.

 

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Posted by AgentKid on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 6:45 AM

Miningman
any of you going to the Calgary Stampede?

I was planning to yesterday after running errands. Then irony of ironies, I got a call on my cell phone and had to return home. Weather permitting I am going to try again today.

Something I picked up from my Mom, I follow both the Chuckwagon Races and rodeo. She started following those when she was a kid back in the thirties. I still miss listening to the wagon races on the radio, CFCN 1060. To this day, watching the races on TV doesn't seem right. I used to go at least once every year to watch them in person.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 8:07 AM

'I rode around the "suicide" curve on the 9th Avenue Elevated probably 100 or more times after birth in Jan 1932 until the El's end-of-service in June 1940, age eight.  The view of the postcard is from 8th Ave. and 110th Street looking to 9th Avenue.  Shortly after the photo, buildings were added in the area, and a local station was added.  Unlike other Manhattan elevated stations, the entrance to the station, both north and south-bound local platforms (expresses on the center track ran through non-stop) was in a building on the north, right-side of the street.  Elevator went from ground level, at the entance ot the bulding, to a mezzanine, where one could cross under the tracks through a  fare-control area to to stairs to the southbound plataform on the left side of the tracks, and then to the platform level for the northbound trains with its own fare-control area.

Of course I never saw steam at that  spot.  Wood open-platform mu cars and those converted to mu-door-control closed-platform cars.  See the Remembering the Third Avenue Elevated thread.

I think the elevator initially was water-powered.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 11:26 AM

Was wondering what that centre track was all about and how people got to it! So thanks Dave, they don't, it's the express track. Duh on my part. Water elevator eh? Still a few operating here and there but mostly as display. They can make some eerie noises like the Titanic going down, moaning and groaning. Must be great memories for you. 

NDG-- yes I recall the lines 'humming' and the telegraph at the station. Can easily see how one can miss those things. Even with modern cell phones we still occasionally get dropped calls and no service areas. In those cases there is nothing as hard line telephones getting scarce as I try to find a phone booth. Think we have one in town, inside a building, does not take money either, need a valid pre pay card thingie.

Bruce-- Chuckwagon races live are truly a sight to behold. Nothing makes you stand up and hoot and holler like the start of a chuckwagon race going around those barrels and shooting out like fully charging steam locomotives.. now that's horsepower. Have fun and enjoy the food and the races. ( watched the qualifying for the semi finals yesterday but on the TV, and not the same at all.. helps if you've seen it live, then you can imagine a bit). Wish the heck I could go, perhaps better health next year. 

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, July 11, 2019 2:19 AM

Bruce, NDG, Dude, cx500 and for all us out in the West: Mike found us this fascinating clip of the Calgary Stampede 1945 by the National Film Board. Chuckwagon race was fierce! Great line " if you break your neck you're disqualified". 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsErtXx1MEw

Of course all steam, some electrics, lots of streetcars throughout the land and ten years to go before the Great Purge! 

 

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Posted by AgentKid on Thursday, July 11, 2019 12:54 PM

Thanks for the clip. The rodeo scenes are filmed where the present day Saddledome is located. Instead of seeing the tops of houses, or a few buildings, highrises form the backdrop in almost every direction now.

This clip, and the talk of Hatton back on Canada Day, has really had me thinking about my Mom. The Stampede is all about recreating the old west, but she could tell you first person accounts of almost everything in the film, including who played what music. Even though my Dad grew up in small town Saskatchewan, she sometimes made it seem like he was a big city kid!

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, July 11, 2019 4:24 PM

So the Saddledome is appropriately named for more than just its appearance! 

Really enjoying watching the Stampede this year. Got to luv those 3 kid teams, boys and girls, trying to get on a wild pony, getting dragged at the end of a rope through the dirt all around the arena, hanging on, they don't give up! 

We need a new event proposal-- get all active working steam locomotives in Alberta and open it up to any steam from anywhere and have pulling contests, time clock races and side by side sprints. Black smoke penalties, slipping penalties, stuff like that. Iron Horse events!!

Fits right in there with Cowboys, Wagons, Steers and Bulls and the Wild West. 

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, July 13, 2019 12:04 AM

Switching set outs and drop offs .. best time. Creative whistle competitions, grab your caboose and crew and fly off in a side to side race with eliminations, best times to a final. Keep a clear stack, steam up and fire high! 

Come on guys show some luv here. Dude, your locomotive could be the pride of Alberta. Perfect fit with the Stampede. 

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