Very strange things

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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, June 6, 2019 7:06 AM

Overmod

That's only expensive because of its street-rod build expense.

The interesting thing to me about the Futurliners is that they're like rolling exhibit stages: the whole middle section opens to reveal an exhibit tableau.  (There is no internal structure in which to put floors and living accommodations to convert one into a motor home, which is why so many were cheaply available for so long)  It is surprising how far up the stairs go to get to the cab, and how small it is once you get there.  (It is also clear from the pictures, but only when you know to look for it, that these all had duals on the front wheels; you do not want to know the fun that poses for any practical road-going use of the things.)

 

I can imagine the ride quality...... as bouncy as the GM Aerotrain. Black Eye

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, June 6, 2019 7:32 AM

I got a chance to climb the stairs into the cab on the Peter Pan Futureliner a number of years ago at the Big E (That's the Eastern States Exposition for you non-New Englanders).  The cab is barely big enough to allow a person to get into the driver's seat.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, June 6, 2019 6:06 PM

Jones1945
This one was very strange indeed...

There's a whole page of interesting carriers here:

https://macsmotorcitygarage.com/car-carriers-of-yesteryear/

The reason for the strange cab location will become clear when you look at a couple of the designs and read the accompanying text.  It allows one more car to ride without increasing the legal 'combination length'.

As an amusing aside on the dual-front-wheel Futurliner, here is a different truck of the future:

http://theoldmotor.com/?p=138179

There's even a design patent for it.

Note that this exactly mirrors the action of a trailer nose pivoting on a single-screw tractor's fifth wheel... 

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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, June 6, 2019 7:14 PM

rcdrye

I got a chance to climb the stairs into the cab on the Peter Pan Futureliner a number of years ago at the Big E (That's the Eastern States Exposition for you non-New Englanders).  The cab is barely big enough to allow a person to get into the driver's seat.

I can imagine the heat inside that tiny cab, and the front axle suspension of the Futureliner is a pair of heavy-duty leaf springs! Oh My...... 

Overmod

As an amusing aside on the dual-front-wheel Futurliner, here is a different truck of the future:

http://theoldmotor.com/?p=138179

There's even a design patent for it.

Note that this exactly mirrors the action of a trailer nose pivoting on a single-screw tractor's fifth wheel... 

Thanks a lot, Overmod. What an eye-opening experience! What has been seen cannot be unseen. Fageol Twin-Coach designed some "interesting" looking buses as well. "It's a box, It's a truck, It's a tin can, It's a tractor, it can be everything...... it is the CargoLiner!" CoffeeSurprise

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, June 7, 2019 12:23 AM

Well actually that Fageol CargoLiner makes sense. Does UPS know about this? 

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Posted by M636C on Friday, June 7, 2019 5:39 AM

Following the earlier discussion of cutaway drawings, as well as the Napier Sabre displayed by Overmod, Napier produced another complex aero engine...

The Napier Nomad:

https://www.google.com/search?q=napier+nomad+cutaway&rlz=1C1QJDA_enAU766AU821&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=lRf2JSxMB35JAM%253A%252CeAkHS2D6oey_VM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kQqlcHXnhM6vcB2QtX0kf-pJFMS1g&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjLlqeckNfiAhVh4HMBHS0CC0EQ9QEwAHoECAAQBA#imgrc=d1raW04CJoDEgM:&vet=1

The link provides a number of diagrams.

This was a diesel turbo-compound. Basically a gas turbine using a flat twelve cylinder diesel as the combustion chamber. There was a significant jet thrust, so this was possibly not suitable as a railcar engine.

This and many other engines are included in a book, I think "British Internal Combustion Aero Engines" (i'll give full details on my return home). The book was apparently written while the author wasrecovering from an operation in hospital (a fairly lengthy process if the book is anything to go by...).

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Saturday, June 8, 2019 4:04 AM

Thank you, Peter.  Through the link, there are some nice articles about artists who are really good at cutaway drawing as well.

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, June 13, 2019 12:23 AM

1) Why? Is this a train for coneheads? 

2) it's your turn to be the fireman.

3) what in tarnation is going on here? 

1) 

 

2) 

 

3) 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, June 13, 2019 10:06 AM

Hmmmm...

Picture One:  A way to economize on tunnel excavations?

Picture Two:  I hope that's what's left of a gravity railway!

Picture Three:  A Norfolk-Southern yard in 1994 after Lady Firestorm found out they cancelled the steam program and took away her "Mighty 611!"  

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, June 13, 2019 10:13 AM

Flintlock76
Picture Three: A Norfolk-Southern yard in 1994 after Lady Firestorm found out they cancelled the steam program and took away her "Mighty 611!"

That can't be right; there's no evidence of ignition.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, June 13, 2019 1:50 PM

Overmod

 

 
Flintlock76
Picture Three: A Norfolk-Southern yard in 1994 after Lady Firestorm found out they cancelled the steam program and took away her "Mighty 611!"

 

That can't be right; there's no evidence of ignition.

 

Those tank cars were empty.  Whistling

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, June 13, 2019 2:36 PM

Overmod
 
Flintlock76
Picture Three: A Norfolk-Southern yard in 1994 after Lady Firestorm found out they cancelled the steam program and took away her "Mighty 611!" 

That can't be right; there's no evidence of ignition.

A blow over!

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, June 14, 2019 1:14 AM

Similar:

 rollover-1 by Edmund, on Flickr

 

http://tsb-bst.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/rail/2005/r05h0013/r05h0013.html

Double-shelf couplers

In this occurrence, the double-shelf couplers functioned as designed: all but one car remained coupled together and no tank heads were punctured. Double-shelf couplers have been effective in preventing tank head punctures. However, they may also increase the number of cars derailed, particularly when empty tank cars are involved. Since these couplers remain interlocked, they are capable of transferring high torsional forces; therefore, one overturning car can initiate the roll over of adjacent cars, increasing the severity of derailments. While this sympathetic roll-over phenomenon has occurred in both loaded and empty tank cars, it was observed that loaded cars were less likely to be affected. The weight of the loaded cars acts as a stabilizing force to counteract the torsional force transmitted through the double-shelf coupler.

"Emphasis mine"

 

This one, in Clara City, Minnesota in October, 2007, was fairly "tidy" :

 clara-city-2007 by Edmund, on Flickr

 

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, June 14, 2019 10:04 AM

Great information, truly appreciated. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, June 14, 2019 1:40 PM

So what is  that thing in Picture One that looks like a "Toblerone" box on wheels?

Anyone know?

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, June 14, 2019 3:17 PM

I like that Wayne! Perhaps it is the shuttle to the Toblerone factory.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, June 14, 2019 5:29 PM

Can't take credit for that one Vince, that was Lady Firestorm's reaction when I showed her the picture!  I wish I did  think of it.

I hope someone  out there knows what that thing is!  Maybe Mike, he knows everything, or at least where to find everything!

Wayne  

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, June 14, 2019 9:52 PM

I'm thinking now that this is a faked picture, some kind of photoshop distortion thing. 

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, June 15, 2019 1:15 AM

Miningman

 

I like that Wayne! Perhaps it is the shuttle to the Toblerone factory.


 

I'm thinking now that this is a faked picture, some kind of photoshop distortion thing. 

 

You might just be on to something there — M.M.

 Toblerone by Edmund, on Flickr

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by M636C on Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:21 AM

gmpullman

 

 
Miningman

 

I like that Wayne! Perhaps it is the shuttle to the Toblerone factory.


 

I'm thinking now that this is a faked picture, some kind of photoshop distortion thing. 

 

 

 

You might just be on to something there — M.M.

 Toblerone by Edmund, on Flickr

Cheers, Ed

 

I think the original photo was of a conventional Japanese interurban electric train of the usual profile with an arch roof. I think the red was the original colour. The original looked OK but the Toblerone version is better.

Peter

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, June 15, 2019 9:19 AM

M636C
I think the original photo was of a conventional Japanese interurban electric train of the usual profile with an arch roof. I think the red was the original colour.

I didn't want to spoil the fun.  From a newsgroup in the UK:

TrainThe train is a former Kinki Nippon Railway – “Kintetsu” – KuMo270 series EMU. It was built in 1977 by Kinki Sharyo for the 2’6”/762mm gauge Hokusei line from Nishi-Kuwana to Ageki, near Nagoya. This line had been set to close, but was instead taken over by the Sangi Railway.’

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, June 15, 2019 9:53 AM

gmpullman

 

 
Miningman

 

I like that Wayne! Perhaps it is the shuttle to the Toblerone factory.


 

I'm thinking now that this is a faked picture, some kind of photoshop distortion thing. 

 

 

 

You might just be on to something there — M.M.

 Toblerone by Edmund, on Flickr

Cheers, Ed

 

Well done Ed, Lady F loves  the "Toblerone Express!"

Maybe you should shoot a copy to Lionel, MTH, or possibly Marklin.  Might give them some ideas!

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, June 18, 2019 10:20 PM

M636C
I'm sure you will get $4.78 worth of reading from even a somewhat degraded copy of the book. I've never seen a paperback version of that book but I have paperback copies of other contemporary Ian Allan titles and they are fine. I have replaced a couple with second hand hardbacks which will last better.

As it turns out, what I received today (for my $4.78 plus almost nominal shipping) is the hardbound reprint of the book, still in its dust jacket, that was produced by the Promotional Reprint Company in 1995.  This appears to have Bonanza-Book-like offset-printing issues with the black-and-white plates, but the line drawings are very clear.  Does the original also have plates ("Figs") 70 and 71 reversed?

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, June 22, 2019 12:28 AM

1) I'm not sure I would go near this... that's a whole lot of boiler for a tiny ROL --- Rest of Locomotive 

2) Another European pedestrian puzzler... out of a tunnel smack into the business district... be careful when you stumble out of a bar.. hope they have a flagman ahead! 

3) A Pennsy Bomber.. does the Central know about this?

 

 

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Saturday, June 22, 2019 1:09 AM

1)  EX-TER-MIN-ATE !!!!!!!

2)  Good thing there is no laundry drying on those balconies.

3)  I wonder what its wheel arrangement is?

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Jones1945 on Saturday, June 22, 2019 5:27 AM

Miningman

3) A Pennsy Bomber.. does the Central know about this?

  

Smile Interesting post, Mr. Miningman.

The story about the Pennsy Bomber "Paoli Local":

http://www.450thbg.com/real/aircraft/paolilocal.shtml

And of course, NYCRR had their plane as well:

 

http://www.iridetheharlemline.com/2016/01/27/planes-of-the-new-york-central-the-railroads-ww2-combat-bombers/

Coffee

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Posted by M636C on Saturday, June 22, 2019 5:41 AM

Miningman

1) I'm not sure I would go near this... that's a whole lot of boiler for a tiny ROL --- Rest of Locomotive 

 

 

This is the power unit for a steam railcar.

It might be one from the English Great Western Railway.

In June 2013 I saw the restored GWR steam railcar depart from Didcot from a train to Exeter. I was surprised by the rapid exhaust beats due no doubt to the small diameter driving wheels.

Peter

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Posted by Jones1945 on Saturday, June 22, 2019 7:42 AM

M636C

 

 
Miningman

1) I'm not sure I would go near this... that's a whole lot of boiler for a tiny ROL --- Rest of Locomotive 

This is the power unit for a steam railcar.

It might be one from the English Great Western Railway.

In June 2013 I saw the restored GWR steam railcar depart from Didcot from a train to Exeter. I was surprised by the rapid exhaust beats due no doubt to the small diameter driving wheels.

Peter

 

Correct!

https://www.didcotrailwaycentre.org.uk/zrailmotor93/power/power.html

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, June 22, 2019 9:38 AM

Great finds on those bomber histories Mr. Jones!  Thanks!

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, June 22, 2019 12:57 PM

All 3 planes lost in the war. Imagine parachuting out of a flaming plane only to be executed on the ground. The stories of these planes prove truth is stranger than fiction. 

Fascinating story on the power unit as well and to think it's been restored! I'm still not going near that thing. 

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