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String Lining

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NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, August 20, 2022 5:39 PM

 

 

Montreal Tramways 5001, 1944.
 
Have not seen this view before.
 
 
Lovely Bell. Where did it go?
 

Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Wednesday, August 31, 2022 6:44 PM
Golden History.
 
After the War, CPR Built Three 3 Steel Bay Window Cabooses.
 
They were of lower profile, and not really popular.
 
Anyway, one was based at Golden, BC as a Rider Car to travel
 w Road Switcher West from Golden to switch sawmills.
 
Here it is in Caboose track on south side of Main Line East of Station.
 
 
 
Vulnerable in a side swipe situation at night? 
 
Note Coal Scuttle and Drinking Water Pail.
 

Thank You.

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, September 4, 2022 6:56 AM

 

CP 8609. From ebay.
 
A clear view of one of these as originally painted with Radiator end Front.
 
 
 
C. 1960 most of the Long Hood Front H-16-44s were converted to
 Short Hood as Front.
 
CP 8554 and CP 8555 were not.
 
Likewise converted were CP's Train Masters. CP 8900 to 8920.
 
Note CP 8547 in Photo. This order had Sealed Beam Headlights within a
 Large Circular Glass-Face opening.
 
Note Extra Steps, w Light, Centre, each end to facilitate climb from Lower-Running Board Units while in motion.
 
The extra steps on corners each end made these very tiring when
 used in Switching.
 
The THIRD Cooling Fan is Centered behind Slanted Front two.
 
There were hinged Shutters below the Fans which Clattered when
Fans turning slowly.
 
2400 HP Units had Four 4 Fans, Two 2 Each Side.
 
Box on Running Board ahead of Cab is Heater, which worked FINE in Summer.
 

Thank You.

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Posted by tree68 on Sunday, September 4, 2022 2:14 PM

NDG
Note CP 8547 in Photo. This order had Sealed Beam Headlights within a  Large Circular Glass-Face opening.

I believe this was a retrofit than many railroads used, replacing the large, single lamp reflector.

Perhaps those pieces of sheet metal were already cut.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
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NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, September 4, 2022 6:20 PM

 

F

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, September 5, 2022 3:31 PM

The ditchlights on modern units also get pretty scummy after trailing for a while, they get covered in dirt and track grease that gets thrown up by the wheels.  The "Grime-Free" hand cleaner packets we get are pretty good at dissolving this stuff, and then you can easily wipe it off with some paper towels.  

I've replaced a few headlight bulbs and many marker light bulbs over the years (CN still puts red lights on DP capable units), but I wouldn't dream of trying that while we're moving. 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, September 5, 2022 4:06 PM

SD70Dude
I've replaced a few headlight bulbs and many marker light bulbs over the years (CN still puts red lights on DP capable units), but I wouldn't dream of trying that while we're moving. 

Trivia:  For those familiar with the animated movie "Polar Express," the headlight bulb changing scene was relatively authentic (aside from being done on a moving train, etc).  

The train sounds for the movie were recorded using PM 1225 at Owosso.  After the sound crew had left, it apparently occurred to someone at the production company that they should know how the bulb was changed in the headlight.  They requested that SRI (Steam Railroading Institute) video the process, which SRI did.  And you've seen the result.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, September 5, 2022 4:36 PM

Didn't some of Western Pacific's early Geeps use those garbage-can headlights?

Some interesting sealed-beam conversions were tried.  NYC and B&O used what I recall was a Pyle conversion that attached on the front of a headlight, replacing the glass and frame -- this defines some of the familiar look of a Niagara.  PRR put vertical sealed beams behind glass on quite a few GG1s.  I have seen ONE picture of a T1 converted to two sealed beams (vertically arranged) -- in Indiana in 1948.  (Didn't the Australian T1-tribute 4-8-4s wind up with horizontal pairs of sealed beams?)

At least one Southern railroad -- I think ACL -- put SEVEN sealed-beam units in one headlight housing... which as I recall had glass in front, perhaps not for too long.  I suspect this did not last any longer than UP and C&NW's vertical 'spotlight' headlights (another fascinating idea).

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, September 6, 2022 8:20 AM

 

Mr. O is correct as usual!
 
EL DID have at least one GP w Garbage Can Headlight. No D/B.
 
 
And WP had several.
 
 
Both CPR and CNR had them, also.
 
CP 8417, Crowsnest. 1975.
 
 
This was LAST CP GP7 before being Rebuilt
 
 
CP 8484.
 
 
The bells were moved to above Headlight on some Units account
 would plug w snow when behind Pilot and not ring.
 
 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, September 6, 2022 9:33 AM

As an aside, those "Golden Glow" reflectors use uranium glass.  Radium glass at a concentration that would show any color would be... unadvisable.  (And about eight-figure expensive in the '20s!)

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, September 8, 2022 9:09 PM

FYI.

Elizabeth.
 
In 1951 the Royals Crossed Canada. We all were there in Welcome.
 
Elizabeth rode the Cab on CN 6057.
 
 
The Number Plate from CN 6057 now reposes in the
 Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Montreal
 

Thank You.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, September 12, 2022 2:32 AM

 

Scan CP 8554.
 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, September 12, 2022 10:07 AM
FWIW.
 
Last CPR Passenger Train Southern Route Across B C. January 16, 1964.

 

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, September 12, 2022 10:09 AM
Sanding an H-16-44. 
 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, October 10, 2022 6:53 AM

O T.

CSL A Lovely Advertisement from Sixty Years Ago.
 
Thought this was wonderful, back in the Day.
 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, October 10, 2022 7:05 AM

NDG
CSL A Lovely Advertisement from Sixty Years Ago.

CSL's ships still ply the Seaway.  I see them in the 1000 Islands frequently. Those ships running through the Welland Canal and the St Lawrence River are limited to just over 700' (IIRC) due to the size of the locks involved.

The "footers" can run everything west of the Welland Canal - they are 1000' and more (longest is 1,014').  The Soo Locks can handle them.  They are impressive.

There is an impressive community of fans of ships comparable to railfans.

 

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, October 10, 2022 3:06 PM

Hanging on the wall in my grandmother's retirement home was a terrific aerial shot of one of those boats passing under Bridge 13 (Main Street) as it threaded its way through downtown Welland.  Before the canal was relocated the city would be cut in half for about 30 minutes every time a boat went through.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, October 15, 2022 10:08 AM
OT.
 

 

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Posted by tree68 on Saturday, October 15, 2022 7:01 PM

It's been suggested that some mysterious ship disappearances in the forties and before were due to the same phenomenon as the SS Grandcamp in Texas City.

The captain of the Grandcamp attempted to fight a fire in the hold by flooding the hold with steam.  The problem was that the cargo was ammonium nitrate.  These days it's known as a blasting agent.  Pieces of the ship were found miles away.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, October 27, 2022 5:48 AM

 

FYI.
 
 
Snow Removal, Montreal, 1957.
 
 
Conventional White and COE Sicard Trucks w Suicide Doors clearing Snow in Montreal
 

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, October 27, 2022 8:40 AM

NDG
FYI. 
Snow Removal, Montreal, 1957.
 
 
Conventional White and COE Sicard Trucks w Suicide Doors clearing Snow in Montreal
 
Manpower required.
 
Streetcars had two 2 years to go.
 
At Time 6:50 as truck turns to back into snow dump hole,
across the street beneath streetlight, a horse-drawn
side walk plow is standing.
 
A gasoline Narrow Gauge side walk plow seen elsewhere. 

Thank You.

Can't think of anything more dangerous than personnel working immediately in front of the snow thrower and its operating, unguarded, auger rotating only a slip, trip or fall from disaster. 

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by adkrr64 on Thursday, October 27, 2022 8:41 AM

NDG
Snow Removal, Montreal, 1957.
 
 
Conventional White and COE Sicard Trucks w Suicide Doors clearing Snow in Montreal 

Watching this brought to mind a question I have always had. At about 4:48, there is a grader shown clearing snow. Why is it that the front wheels on graders are designed to tilt from one side or the other?

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, October 27, 2022 12:31 PM

adkrr64
Why is it that the front wheels on graders are designed to tilt from one side or the other?

I've always been under the impression that it was to better counteract the side force of the blade, particularly when cutting.

Note that when used for cutting (ie, grading a road by taking off the top layer) the angle of the blade itself is different than when it's being used for moving snow, when the angle is more dragging than cutting.  I don't think that's adjustable from the cab - you have to loosen bolts and adjust the tilt of the blade.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, October 27, 2022 12:57 PM

 

Re Snow Removal.
 
There was usually one 1 fatality a winter

Thank You.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, October 27, 2022 1:59 PM

No snow blowers for urban streets that I've ever seen. The Illinois Tollway Authority does have winged snowplows in their snowfighting fleet.  They have a definite resemblance to a Jordan spreader when the wings are extended.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, October 27, 2022 2:39 PM

tree68
 
adkrr64
Why is it that the front wheels on graders are designed to tilt from one side or the other? 

I've always been under the impression that it was to better counteract the side force of the blade, particularly when cutting.

Note that when used for cutting (ie, grading a road by taking off the top layer) the angle of the blade itself is different than when it's being used for moving snow, when the angle is more dragging than cutting.  I don't think that's adjustable from the cab - you have to loosen bolts and adjust the tilt of the blade.

Cutting Edge Engineering has a series of videos detailing repairs being made to a Cat Grader.  In this particular video it is demonstrated that the blade can be moved to almost any angle and position that the operator may want for whatever the reaseon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LK1Wq1HgSVE

 

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, October 27, 2022 3:32 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

No snow blowers for urban streets that I've ever seen. The Illinois Tollway Authority does have winged snowplows in their snowfighting fleet.  They have a definite resemblance to a Jordan spreader when the wings are extended.

A city near me uses snowblowers to clear out the streets as a clean-up method.  Faster than front loaders. Some town and county highway departments have them, and the state definitely does.  We're in the "snow belt," so single snowfalls of a foot or more are always a consideration.

Some municipalities have snowblowers that hang on a front loader.

Virtually all plows used on the highways in this area (and many used in cities and villages) have at least a right side wing.  Some have wings on both sides.  Localities generally use a "wing man," although the state has gone to one-man plows for many routes.  The driver operates the wing.

The underbody scraper I saw used in Michigan back in the day is a rarity here.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, November 3, 2022 11:37 AM
FYI. 
 
CPR Diesel Locomotive Roster.
 
 

Thank You.

 

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, November 4, 2022 6:13 AM

FYI.

Interior View Montreal Tramways 1939 From ebay.
 
 
 
One Man Car. On Route 48, St Antoine which was changed to Autobus
 on November 3 1957.
 
Note hinged Wood Seat, front, both sides, which covered Sand Boxes.
 

Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, November 5, 2022 10:21 AM
Photographs are where you find them.
 
Gone for Scrap.
 

 

 

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