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String Lining

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NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, May 30, 2020 2:29 PM
Welding Truck, Montreal Tramways.
 
When Welding had to be done or wear of switch components had to be built up by Electric Welding a Welding Truck was employed.
 
 
The Electric Current used in the various procedures was taken from the
 Trolley Wire, the Ground Return, the rails themselves.
 
A streetcar Trolley Pole used to contact the wire, it swung out of the way
 when a Streetcar approached.
 
A truck similar to this was often working on the Switches at the Wye where
we boarded cars to go Downtown, it's Welder and the Arcsurrounded by a Canvas shield to protect the people awaiting at the Stop from the Glare of the Arc and splatter.
 
As a child I thought the Truck was ELECTRIC and followed the wire as a
 Streetcar would to get back to the Car Barns.
 
Not So.
 
Photo from this Site.
 
 
Thank You.
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Posted by tree68 on Saturday, May 30, 2020 2:40 PM

NDG
As a child I thought the Truck was ELECTRIC and followed the wire as a  Streetcar would to get back to the Car Barns.   Not So.

But your concept wasn't far off the mark:  Detroit Street Railways - Detroit "Trackless Trolley"

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, May 30, 2020 3:08 PM

 

New Buses and Kids.
 
The electric buses we saw after the War were of a Brill design.
 
 
This version, as your photo showed, were Gasoline Powered.
 
 
We called the fairings as above the front door ' Smoke Deflectors '.
 
Before TV, we spent much time away from home on our bicycles exploring watching trains, ships in the Canal and new constructions, the odd job still using a ' Steam Shovel ' as per Mister Mulligan. The water came from a Hydrant for Fire Trucks. 
 
 
A trip to ride a Trolley Bus required several routes and Transfers, as they were confined to their end of town re Trolley Wire and Power supply, and took all day.
 
 
Lots to see and do when a kid, much of it gone.
 
Most of it, Steam.
 

Thank You.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, May 30, 2020 4:13 PM

 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Wednesday, June 3, 2020 10:08 AM

The de-activated swing bridge reminds me of several railroad bridges over the Sanitary and Ship Canal from just west of Kedzie Avenue to Summit.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Wednesday, June 3, 2020 5:58 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

The de-activated swing bridge reminds me of several railroad bridges over the Sanitary and Ship Canal from just west of Kedzie Avenue to Summit.

Do either of the BNSF (Former SF) bridges that you mention over the  canal ever open (or can) ? I know the tow (pushers) boats have pilot houses that duck but are the bridges totally inactive?  

Also, since you brought up bridges near Chicago, the CN (Ex EJ&E) bridge over the Illinois River near the Dresden Nuclear Plant has little traffic but I got to ride it (down, up & down, & up) one time when I observed the operator go to it for a  freight delivery to an industry (Reichhold Chemical or Aeropres) on the south side of the river. It was built, I believe, when there were coal mines (Coal City Illinois) around there but now it serves one or two plants by the river and an occasional (rare) shipment for the generating station. Bet the bean counters would like to shed it. Can't be cheap to maintain it.

 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, June 4, 2020 10:20 AM

The design of the bridges suggests that the bridge tender's cabin was on the platform above the center pier.  They may have been able to operate at one point but were probably de-activated after WW2.  South Shore's first bridge over the Calumet River was similar but it was replaced in the 1960's to improve clearances on the river.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Monday, June 8, 2020 9:46 PM

A treasure trove of photos (mostly B&W) of railroads, looks to be mostly in the 1960s from the few I looked at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kheelcenter/ 

"Albums" in thumbnail format - the first 33 are railroads, with a brief description and the number of photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kheelcenter/albums 

"Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, ILR School, Cornell University www.ilr.cornell.edu/library/kheel. The Kheel Center collects, preserves, and makes accessible special collections pertaining to the history of the workplace and labor relations."

Enjoy! 

- PDN. 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, June 26, 2020 1:30 PM

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, September 5, 2021 4:20 PM

The final cut has been completed in the process to remove the MV Golden Ray from where it capsized in St. Simons Sound near Brunswick, GA - just short of 2 full years from when it went over on September 8, 2019.

https://www.firstcoastnews.com/article/news/local/final-cut-completed-on-golden-ray-wreck-newspaper-reports/77-99cc2ac1-d9d8-466d-be3d-17b97253f42a

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 10:58 PM

NTSB attributes Golden Ray capsizing in St. Simons Sound, GA to the Chief Officer having the vessel improperly ballasted.

https://www.firstcoastnews.com/article/news/local/golden-ray-ntsb-report/77-80710ccb-06d8-4ee7-91ea-e0f2f3b354e0

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, April 3, 2022 11:47 AM

Thank You.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, April 3, 2022 5:58 PM
CNR Oil Burning Mountain, Toronto.
 
Way Back Oil Burning CN 6057 can be found on the
 Shop Track @ Spadina Roundhouse, Torrana The Good.
 
Note Coal Tower behind.
 
Note Western Pilot made of Wood so that it can be removed
 from under Front Truck after striking Rocks.
 
 
 
In 1957 it can be found @ Fort William, burning Coal. Steel Tube Pilot.
 
CN 6057 Coal.
 
 
#6057 Class U-1-e (4-8-2) Mountain type at the Canadian National Railway station, Fort William, Ontario, July 6, 1957. Photo courtesy of Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society 972.272.16ii
 
FWIW.
 
C. 1950 CNR began applying Cast Iron Numerals to Locomotive Cab Sides, which were then painted Yellow.
 
After cabs were stripped off during Scrapping, they were burned
to removed Wood Siding before loading metal into Gons destined for steel mills, Cab Numerals littered the Pyre Location.
 
After Smoke Box, Pilot and Drawbar removed, Cylinders were cut off front of frames and loaded Thee 3 to a Gon.
 

Thank You.

 

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, April 3, 2022 8:28 PM

Welcome back with a bang!

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Monday, April 4, 2022 2:13 PM

  Glad to hear from you, NDG.  I've been missing your stories and interesting topics you've introduced.

_____________ 

  "A stranger's just a friend you ain't met yet." --- Dave Gardner

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, April 4, 2022 7:37 PM

You are welcome!

 

We are fast becoming the last generation that remembers just after the War when we travelled by Train and Streetcar, not owning a car until the mid Fifties. 

Went down to the station 'cause the Train had a Diesel!!

We've Been There, Done That in many ways and experienced much that will never be again.

Alot can be said about the Conduct on various Forums and of their members.

Too many Funerals, too many Hospital visits.

 

We are all bound for the same Objective Terminal.

 

The Postings are meant to inform and often amuse. 

There are tears, too, and loneliness as Seniority Lists shorten.

It's the way it is and was.

Still miss Steam Whistles in the Night. Switch Lamps, and much, much more as I approach my Ninth Decade.

You could tell when he had crested the Grade as he Hooked Her up on the Flat.

 

BTW. Did Six 6 miles on my 4-8-2 Bike today, and it DID Snow for a while around 15K.

Mr. Kat is pouting about something, Again. Still?

He may come back, too?

See how it goes.

 

Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 11:35 AM
From The Transportation Safety Board of Canada.
 
RAIL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY
INVESTIGATION REPORTS
 
 
Two Runaways.
 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
Freight train 301-349
Mile 130.6, Laggan Subdivision
Yoho, British Columbia
04 February 2019
 
 
RUNAWAY/DERAILMENT
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
TRAIN NO. 353-946
LAGGAN SUBDIVISION
FIELD, BRITISH COLUMBIA
02 DECEMBER 1997
 
 

Thank You.

 

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 12:27 PM

Euclid... paging Euclid!  Mandate for automatic parking brakes in Canada may be in process...

Remember the NS training about the 'Mountain of Challenge'?  Apparently nothing like it for Field... and little or nothing about the effects of severe cold on what might be interchanged cars...

I did think -- perhaps naively -- that a #1 brake test at -26 would be a reasonable predictor of behavior at -28.  But it does occur to me that monitoring the rate of pressure maintaining would sure be a reasonable guide to how long an emergency set would last...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 12:45 PM

Creston, B C. M. 67.3 ( 1931 ) CPR Nelson Sub.

 
Here is a photograph looking West taken from the roof of first CPR Station at Creston, B C, April 24, 1916.
 
 
The Short Gondolas w Roof Walks coupled each end of the box
are  steel Drop-Bottom Gondolas named Coke Racks which were used for transporting Coke from coal mine coke ovens to various customers.
 
EXAMPLE. Coke Rack. No Roof Walk.
 
 
Also worth noting is that Station has Lower Quadrant Train Order Signal.
 
Great Northern Railway traveled at bottom of slope on it's way
to it's Kootenay Lake Water Routes having Running Rights
over CPR part of the way.
 
Photograph from this Site.
 
 
Errata Photo Caption. Scroll down.
 
Caption 1905 Date for photo of Creston Station is wrong.
 
Forties. Upper Quadrant T/O Signal. Tall Poles bracketing Station are to
support Antenna for Low-Wattage CBC Radio AM Broadcast Transmitter in
Station for Community. Signal over CPR Wires/Pole Line. 
 
This Station replaced 1949 w one about 1/2 mile East. Still extant.
 
 
Kootenay Landing Bridge. M. 83.1 CPR Nelson Sub.
 
 
 
Kootenay Landing Bridge on Google. Note Shadow Lift Span.
 
 
Former Slipway thru 1930 angled above on East Shore. West end of steel thru 1930.
 
Barges, Tugs and Sternwheelers used to Procter Now M. 117.5 CPR Nelson Sub.
 
Once all trestle filled East to East shore. GN Ry. Junctioned North 1/4 Mile East.
 
 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 2:07 PM

That Kootenay Landing Bridge needs to be posted on the Model Railroader site as a fascinating prototype.  I don't remember a plate girder span being used between through trusses as a lift span, but it survives as such to this day, and there are sure to be places the design would be valuable!

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 2:54 PM

Have Walked out there several times, and across to West Shore.

Bridge was operated by men pushing on a Tee-Bar Key inserted over square stems in holes in deck of bridge, one of which operated the Locks and Wedges, the opposite wound the lifting cables.

 

L-Shaped Brackets on downstream side girder held Key parallel to track w Switch Lock.

Telegraph wires went up and over. 

 

FWIW.

 

There is another once key-operated Swing Bridge at M.70.1 CPR Windermere
 
Sub. 100 Ft. Deck Plate Girder. Columbia River Bridge  1. 1914 in Abutment.
 
On Google w/ Train.
 
 
This Is Indian Land. Ask permission!!
 
 
Yes, the is the same Columba River as at Astoria and the Columbia River Bar.
 
The OTHER Columbia River Bar...@ Canal Flats. True Source of the Mighty Columbia?
 
 
Union Station. Burned Summer 1969.
 
 

Thank You.

 

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 3:22 PM
CP 7005 CLC Demo Set. Penticton 1951.
 
CLC 7005
 
 
CLC 7005-7006 Demo Set. W Dynamometer Car.
 
Penticton, B.C Sept 1951.
 
 
Site.
 
 
Striped Poles behind Station are for CBC Low-Wattage AM Broadcasting Antenna. Transmitter in Station.
 
FWIW.
 
Probably CP 4052 trailing Unit A-B-B-A which rear-ended Passenger Train @ Osprey Lake, October 07, 1955.
 
CP 4077-4471-4457-4052
 
 
Lead Unit CP 4077 climbed up into Trailing Car, tearing off it's Fuel Tank and set fire beneath trailing Three Units.
 
Note Run Around Train Line Air Hose up thru Cab Window.
 
Note Water Car made from Tenders ahead of Caboose.
 

Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, April 9, 2022 12:42 PM
Elevator Burns.
 
 
On Google Maps.
 
 
 
 
Steel Still in, and Shiny! to serve a large modern elevator not far away.
 
 
 
 
 
Elevators.
 
 
 
Before electricity arrived the small shed often housed an internal combustion engine to drive elevator scoop chain, it distanced from elevator in the event of fire,
 

Thank You.

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, April 10, 2022 4:29 PM

Great to have you back!

Here's another example of string lining, with a fatality.  I suppose that brings this thread full circle.  

http://tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/rail/2019/r19t0147/r19t0147.html

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, April 10, 2022 5:52 PM

SD70Dude
Great to have you back!

Here's another example of string lining, with a fatality.  I suppose that brings this thread full circle.  

http://tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/rail/2019/r19t0147/r19t0147.html

15 degree curve is rather sharp - even if it is in yard territory.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, April 10, 2022 7:16 PM
Fatality.
 
My Cousin passed away on the 8th, putting a Caboose on a Train of Memories dating back to the War and Beyond. She used to bottle-feed me as my Mother
was very ill at the time.
 
Lots of personal Reflection and Introspection the last few days.
 
Was fortunate when on the Railway I was never close to a Fatal whilst I was On Duty.
 
One New Hire lost right hand  ' Coupled ' when reaching in to adjust the Joint @
Canal Flats.  I was Fifty Miles away and could hear only the Locomotive Radio side, and that broken up.
 
A Helicopter was sent and we saw it go and return.
 
 
When a Slide put three Units into the Lake, killing two on Head End, 
a Helicopter had to be sent out w Roadmaster to Release Track so Trains and Rescue could come by Rail.
 
Conductor riding in Trailing Unit survived, but lost his radio in ride down
and could not report.
 
 
Way years ago a CPR Crew shoved Ore Empties way out of Yard Limits
onto INCO Trackage as INCO NEVER ran a Turn on Sundays.
 
This Sunday they DID.
 
INCO approached YL at normal speed as YL Board 30 or so cars away and hit the cars way out.
 
Electric Locomotive..
 
Trainman killed outright.
 
Engineer thrown clear on impact, but received two 2 broken legs.
 
Froze to death as -30 F as train not 'missed ' by INCO for quite a while.
 
CP Cars NOT on Air, as Yard Move and CP Crew pulled out.
 
Last car derailed on the impact and was there w Electric Loco.
 
Miningman should recall this. Was in Toronto papers w Photo from air.
 
 
On a lighter note.
 
 
Looking West. In BC.
 
Here is Roof View CP 4065 showing holes for Cooling Fans.
 
 
1600 HP OP. Three Fans, Four Holes as 1600HP. CPA-16-4.
 
Round Plates cover holes for S/G, removed 1957.
 
Water Fill Pipe for Rads by Right Stack.
 
Later 1600 HP CLC units had only Three Fans and Holes.
 
Lift Rings protruded above Roof Line on early Units, Flush LATER.
 
Turntable Air Operated. Two-Cylinder Air Engine far end of Table, right side.
 
Small Shed for Kershaw Snow Plow.
 
Looking East.
 
 
Note Ladder, Right.
 
Drop Bottom Gon, left w GMD F-Unit.
 
H-16-44 in Multi Mark Paint w Fuel Stand to the left.
 
Fuel Tank Car and Pump House to Right.
 
Alberta just out of frame, top.
 

Thank You.

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, April 11, 2022 4:01 PM

I wish they'd build some of those in Jasper.  Bears get killed on the track every year here too, but it never seems to make the news.  There have even been a number of three legged ones over the years, which became that way after getting drunk on rotten grain and then not rolling out of the way in time..... (they like to monopolize a pile of grain and are loathe to leave it even when sober).  Then they become even more dependent on grain, since it can't run away.  

That poor Inco crew.  Did everything right and died just the same.  

A conductor lost his foot in a similar injury at the Roberts Bank port a few years ago.  He went to kick a misaligned drawbar into place at the last second, missed, and his foot was between the drawbars when the joint made.  

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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    December 2013
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, April 12, 2022 8:30 PM

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