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String Lining

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 2, 2020 3:12 PM

NDG
On front engine pilot it would follow curves better.

This was explicit in the N&W class A design, where good headlight 'coverage' was significant.  Prior to that it was fairly common on Mallets, and I'm surprised the author of the 2-10-10-6 didn't make that notation.

But even so, you're going to want a flexible headlight mount relative to the rigid wheelbase of the forward engine, which will still have the characteristics of a 2-10-0 relative to the physical hinge point.  This almost of necessity would have to be a proportional air setup with feedback control near or at the moving light itself, not the 'motor' doing the actual motion.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 2, 2020 3:13 PM

NDG
On front engine pilot it would follow curves better.

This was explicit in the N&W class A design, where good headlight 'coverage' was significant.  Prior to that it was fairly common on Mallets, and I'm surprised the author of the 2-10-10-6 didn't make that notation.

But even so, you're going to want a flexible headlight mount relative to the rigid wheelbase of the forward engine, which will still have the characteristics of a 2-10-0 relative to the physical hinge point.  This almost of necessity would have to be a proportional air setup with feedback control near or at the moving light itself, not the 'motor' doing the actual motion.  I would actually recommend a mechanical clutch or brake, which would engage promptly upon indication from the crew that the light was pointing 'where they wanted' to prevent overshoot or 'porpoising' around the commanded holding position.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, January 2, 2020 3:19 PM

Scene;

 

Cab PRR Baldwin Centipede being used on curvy branch line, nose brushing trees and Traction Motors not being cooled, alternately.

Engineer yells "DUCK " as Nose just clears a 3-Foot Maple on left side.

Fireman Replies; " No, it was a Robin! "

 

Thank You.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 2, 2020 3:22 PM

NDG
Cab PRR Baldwin Centipede being used on curvy branch line, nose brushing trees and Traction Motors not being cooled, alternately.

It's not the nose that causes the problem; it's the pilot.  Remember this is an articulated underframe...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, January 2, 2020 3:26 PM

" Joining the Birds " and still on the TRACK??

Thank You.

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, January 2, 2020 3:31 PM

I can't imagine dolling out $1,000 bucks for an O scale model with sound, digital, lights and all that jazz, plus all the time and effort and whole lot more bucks into the layout itself and the result is that embarrassing horrible awkward totally Mickey Mouse operation. 

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 2, 2020 3:36 PM

NDG
" Joining the Birds " and still on the TRACK??

Oh, that's good.  Yes, thank you is in order...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, January 2, 2020 4:13 PM
Another Story.
 
Many Years ago when working Tail End I used to sit in cupola of Caboose, Remember them? as train wound and wended it's way West
around Kootenay Lake on the Nelson Subdivision.
 
Kootenay Lake.
 
 
At night one could look across the many bays and curves and see the headlight of the locomotive tracing the way.
 
Out over the lake, then straight, then illuminating the cliffs to the left, then straight for a bit.
 
On and On mile after mile at Track Speed.
 
One view that was always neet to watch as light illuminated a rock face, a Black Hole in front of engine as a tunnel approached.
 
Closer, closer, closer, then it went OUT as lead unit plunged into the hole.
 
A few minutes later into the same hole, with the Caboose, smoke stack spewing sparks as it's draft changed.
 
It was an unwritten Rule all Assigned end cupola Cabeese were to have CUPOLA on West End so Conductor's desk faced the WATER
going West rather than rock wall face blurring past 10 feet away from Kootenay Landing to Balfour.
 
Conductor's desk faced window to Left.
 
 
This design was HATED, here. BUT! Prairie Crews liked them.
 
 
Steel Cabooses ' Drummed ' inside and rode stiff.
 
Wood Cabooses were softer ride on leaf springs and muted inside.
 
However.
 
There were TWO 2 rear end collisions w Steel Cabooses and Conductor SURVIVED.
 
No Flag per Rule 99. Conductor Fired.
 
Caboose on front H-16-44
 
 
 
UP Crew asleep.
 
 
 
One old Red Cheeked Conductor with 35 years in was Ranting about the Engineer up front as lamp chimneys shattered,
water sloshed from cisterns and windows shut themselves.
 
A REAL rough ride on a Subdivision known for rough rides.
 
The Engineer Hated the Conductor, so he may well have been doing it on purpose??
 
He was also speeding, the wheel clatter on the 39s a blur, below.
 
It was raining, rocks raining down, too and roadbed embankment sloughing into lake as we watched.
 
The Conductor summed it up. " I don't CARE how FAST the A Hole goes!! HIS end of the train gets there FIRST!!
 
 
Note handy folding hinged wood framed window screen in side window for ventilation
 
 
Years Ago.
 
Thank You.
 
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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, January 3, 2020 4:06 PM

NDG
Another Story.
 
Many Years ago when working Tail End I used to sit in cupola of Caboose, Remember them? as train wound and wended it's way West
around Kootenay Lake on the Nelson Subdivision.
 
Kootenay Lake.
 
 
At night one could look across the many bays and curves and see the headlight of the locomotive tracing the way.
 
Out over the lake, then straight, then illuminating the cliffs to the left, then straight for a bit.
 
On and On mile after mile at Track Speed.
 
One view that was always neet to watch as light illuminated a rock face, a Black Hole in front of engine as a tunnel approached.
 
Closer, closer, closer, then it went OUT as lead unit plunged into the hole.
 
A few minutes later into the same hole, with the Caboose, smoke stack spewing sparks as it's draft changed.
 
It was an unwritten Rule all Assigned end cupola Cabeese were to have CUPOLA on West End so Conductor's desk faced the WATER
going West rather than rock wall face blurring past 10 feet away from Kootenay Landing to Balfour.
 
Conductor's desk faced window to Left.
 
 
This design was HATED, here. BUT! Prairie Crews liked them.
 
 
Steel Cabooses ' Drummed ' inside and rode stiff.
 
Wood Cabooses were softer ride on leaf springs and muted inside.
 
However.
 
There were TWO 2 rear end collisions w Steel Cabooses and Conductor SURVIVED.
 
No Flag per Rule 99. Conductor Fired.
 
Caboose on front H-16-44
 
 
 
UP Crew asleep.
 
 
One old Red Cheeked Conductor with 35 years in was Ranting about the Engineer up front as lamp chimneys shattered,
water sloshed from cisterns and windows shut themselves.
 
A REAL rough ride on a Subdivision known for rough rides.
 
The Engineer Hated the Conductor, so he may well have been doing it on purpose??
 
He was also speeding, the wheel clatter on the 39s a blur, below.
 
It was raining, rocks raining down, too and roadbed embankment sloughing into lake as we watched.
 
The Conductor summed it up. " I don't CARE how FAST the A Hole goes!! HIS end of the train gets there FIRST!!
 
 
Note handy folding hinged wood framed window screen in side window for ventilation
 
 
Years Ago.
 
Thank You.

I would get 'seasick' staring at a blurry rock wall for that long!

Was the reason behind not flagging ever explained?

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, January 3, 2020 5:06 PM

The BN once went to Nelson, BC, the line being a remnant of the GN's once extensive Canadian holdings, many of the built so that Jim Hill could spite the CPR, which he was forced out of.  

At the time of these photos, the Nelson line was the most northerly point on the BN system.

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=33136

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=26587

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=18702

A slow, backwoods line with little traffic left by the 1980s.  And a torturous climb out of Nelson.

Photos from this fellow's account:

http://railpictures.ca/author/Foamer2342

A couple more highlights, the Prince Albert, SK area:

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=39458

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=15433

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=38866

Racing to Vancouver.  Note lack of paint, they are on a tight schedule and already very late:

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=37382

Now located just northeast of Red Deer, AB, this bridge was originally built across the McLeod River on the Canadian Northern transcontinental line at Tollerton, AB, just south of Edson.  After the formation of CN that section of the CNoR was abandoned, and the steel bridge was dismantled and used to replace a wooden trestle:

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=24087

The mechanical reefer is probably destined to a Red Deer packing plant that still shipped by rail.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, January 3, 2020 8:39 PM

I would get 'seasick' staring at a blurry rock wall for that long! Was the reason behind not flagging ever explained?

 

He was  ' asleep ' in the Caboose.

 

He SHOULD have gone Flagging as outside Y L.

A ' Lifestyle ' prevalent in that era.

At the Mine, in The Bush and on The Railway.

Cabooses DIED often, before Radio.

Men, too.

 

Thank You.

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, January 4, 2020 2:39 PM
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, January 5, 2020 2:43 AM
FYI
 
Steam @ Sea.
 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by tree68 on Sunday, January 5, 2020 7:10 AM

NDG
Steam @ Sea.

Very cool.  

I recall the old "Boblo Boats" running up and down the Detroit River.  Passengers could view the engineering spaces, which were all spit and polish.

I did some sea time aboard the only remaining steam reciprocating triple expansion boat in the Navy inventory (and now razor blades) in the seventies.  Didn't get down into the engine room at all, but got a  peek or two of it - quite the thing.  That was on a Liberty ship.

I kind of felt for the fellow in the engine room in the video.  Didn't look like his perch was all that comfortable.  Granted, he likely had other things to do, but on a longer trip, well...

Of course, the green types would not much care for the smoke, and especially dumping the ashes over the side...

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, January 5, 2020 7:53 AM

I had a hard time figuring out why a boat that size had twin screws (engines 520kW apiece) until they mentioned it was a tug.  Note the primary airflow (with natural draft!) at about 5:30.

The fireboxes here are very similar to the Vanderbilt locomotive firebox, if you're wondering how that worked.

If the ash removal pains you, look at the system that was installed on SS Badger to put her back in service.

There's a lot of precision fabrication evident throughout.  Look at the wear in the steering-engine repeater mechanism... and the original clock-like finishing of the gears and pinions.

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Posted by tree68 on Sunday, January 5, 2020 12:54 PM

Overmod
If the ash removal pains you, look at the system that was installed on SS Badger to put her back in service.

Indeed - was thinking of that as I wrote...

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, January 5, 2020 4:19 PM

Interesting video of that West German tug.  Looks like it was government-owned, it was flying the state (government) ensign.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, January 5, 2020 9:05 PM

 

FYI.

Water Train, 3 Cylinder Steam.

 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, January 6, 2020 7:03 PM

FYI,

The last two FM/CLC A-units in existence:

Image may contain: sky and outdoor

Image may contain: train, sky and outdoor

Image may contain: outdoor

The last two photos are from here:

https://bytownrailwaysociety.blogspot.com/

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, January 6, 2020 7:08 PM

Graffiti on 4104. Good Lord, not good.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, January 6, 2020 8:00 PM

 

Thank You for Posting those photos, and great to see the restoration work that has been done!
 
There is HOPE!!
 
 
Did MANY, MANY miles on CP 4065 half a Century ago.
 
Tough old Locomotive, never let us down, not stalled nor doubled.
 
Run 8 for hours, Ammeter in the Red. Held the rail where a GP9 would slip to a stop.
 
Subtle Cab differences, along with CP 4064, as Demos, than rest of the CP C-Lines.
 
CP 4065 on the other Stoney Creek Bridge, Tadanac, B.C.
 
 
And so on.
 
Damn Good Locomotive, for it's time.
 
Thank You Westinghouse for the Electrics. 
 
The Graffiti Sucks.
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Posted by MMLDelete on Monday, January 6, 2020 10:26 PM

Miningman

Graffiti on 4104. Good Lord, not good.

 

Where did you see that?

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, January 6, 2020 11:21 PM

I'm told that 4104 was tagged while sitting outside the Ogden Shops in Calgary.  Ditto for "CP 7009", the baby Train Master now sitting beside 4104 in Nelson.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, January 6, 2020 11:28 PM

LO-- Top picture with SKA spray painted on the FM/CLC CPR #4104.  Could be a 'skoden' varient, which means 'lets go then', a invitation to fight over a perceived insult. Stupid stuff. Tough guy stupid stuff.  

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Posted by MMLDelete on Tuesday, January 7, 2020 1:40 AM

Thanks MM.

I had a senior moment. I thought you were talking about UP Big Boy 4014! Sorry.

But yes, graffiti on the CP unit is terrible. I hate all graffiti.

BTW, I see where posts about graffiti are prohibited, considered too incendiary. Why is this? It's hard to believe any railroader would defend graffiti.

Kids expressing themselves with "art?" Naaah. Vandalism is vandalism. The graffiti on boxcars really diminishes my enjoyment of seeing trains.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, January 9, 2020 3:48 AM
FIY.
 
With Westinghouse on There, They Will Make It.  Revelstoke, B C. August 1, 1967.
 
CPR Stepped into Second Generation with Orders for 65 SD40s, CP 5500-5564.
 
Advanced, Modern, Low Nose, Water Coolers and Toilets for Head End Crews.
 
Trouble was, they were not much good in the Mountains...
 
Cure?
 
Put 2 F-Ms on there, and they WOULD make it. This Time.
 
 
Next Orders for New Power went to MLW.
 
Thank You.
 

PS. Note H-16-44 trailing on Eastbound.

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, January 9, 2020 7:01 AM

Lithonia Operator
I thought you were talking about UP Big Boy 4014!

I did the same thing, with 4014 in the news lately.  

Alas, to the taggers it was just another blank canvas.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by cx500 on Thursday, January 9, 2020 5:49 PM

NDG
 
Put 2 F-Ms on there, and they WOULD make it. This Time.
 
 
Next Orders for New Power went to MLW.
 
PS. Note H-16-44 trailing on Eastbound.
 

The other thing to note is that the two SD40s have slightly different stencilling.  The script "Canadian Pacific" on the second unit is smaller than on the lead.  Initially they just used the same stencil that was used on the 1st generation units, but after the first 12(?) units were delivered a new diagram was created that stretched out the lettering to provide better balance on the longer carbody.

John

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, January 10, 2020 5:19 AM
Another F-M Saves the Day Consist.
 
To Fill Out to Tons and Fill the sidings, as Two SDs would not pull what was Rated, extra power added to Tons.
 
Here is another set.
 
 
Designs from Beloit and LaGrange working together in a Union not conceived?
 
Worth watching, in the rain and Sand giving out.
 
Westinghouse could handle it.  ( The H-16 was GE Just as Good. )
 
And did!
 
No wonder they were ' Junk ' the way they were handled.
 
FWIW.
 
CP 4065 @ 8 MPH.
 
 
CP 4105 Ditto.  38D1/8/244/567. Almost dark.
 
 
 
Cold, Full Moon. Venus set. Stars screaming up above, Coyotes Howling afar.
 
Time for Thought, Reflection and Retrospection. 
 
Memories.
 

Thank You.

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