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Pre War American Flyer Pictures - An Invitation

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Thursday, October 16, 2008 10:15 AM

Jago

Thats a real nice yellow 1218 when you find one like this do you

a... leave the paintwork as found

b...give it a clean and polish or

c...go the whole hog and go for a repaint

just curious as to your approach to these great trains

Hi Jago,

In answer to your question I would have to say "It depends".  Somewhere on the forum I have a post about my philosphy of collecting.  I'm not sure how to link it here yet.  I'm still getting used to the changes. Briefly,  I tend to buy the best conditon item that I can afford.  That gives me lots of variation in the condition that I collect, and I have on occasion upgraded to a better condition item, and then the theory is to sell off the lesser graded item.  So far I have not sold many items off just because I have been working at filling in the missing items in my collection.

The basic standard is to buy items in original conditon. 

I do the basic amount of clean up - I appreciate the wear the items have.  Those dents and chips represent a lot of fun experienced by the string of owners.

I don't do any repaint or touch up myself - mainly because I haven't tried it yet.  And I don't buy anything anymore with the intention of restoring it.  That might be an aspect I will attempt when I reach retirement

While I don't buy many repaints, I do like a few; mostly items painted in colors that American Flyer never tried, especially if I think they look good.

If an Item is uncommon or unlikely to come up often I might buy it if is in relatively rough condition just to have it in my collection.  But I will keep an eye out for a better example.  And if I miss an example I usually just keep looking.  These are mass produced toys, there are hundreds and thousands of them still hiding in attics and closets. Another example will come along.

I think this might have been a bit long than you had expected, but I thought I would be thorough. Smile

Northwoods Flyer

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Posted by mersenne6 on Friday, October 17, 2008 9:07 AM

 

   I went over to York yesterday in the hopes of adding something to the collection - no joy - not much in the way of prewar Flyer - at least not what I was looking for.  So except for the cost of gas and tolls I brought back everything I took over there....oh well, maybe next time

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Posted by RockIsland52 on Friday, October 17, 2008 11:33 AM

You might want to hold off and read Bob Keller's post from yesterday afternoon re archives and old photos.  Believe he said a lot of stuff will be uploaded over the weekend including old pictures..

Jack

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Posted by 3railphillyoperator on Friday, October 17, 2008 12:59 PM

Hi all,

 This is my first post on Trains.com. I am 66yrs of age and was given two AF 3/16th O sets for my first Christmas in 1942. I currently have in 3/16th O the Atlantic(4-4-2), Pacific(4-6-2), & Northern (4-8-4) engines. In addition in 3/16th O I have the diecast freight cars (box, cattle, coal, tank, gondola, & caboose. I'm looking for the crane car. I have the 3/16th O diecast passenger cars and combine car. I have the tinplate freight cars with the exception of the crane car and the flatcar with girder load. I also have the 3/16th O tinplate passenger cars in Pennsy red and the mail car in Pullman green. I have an S guage #342 yard goat (0-8-0) that I hope to convert to O and the S guage Pullman observation that I hope to convert to O.

X2000 asked some months ago, about a prewar 3-rail set believed to be late thirties. I do not know if it is a set but I believe the items are 3/16th O guage. If so, his description matches the #565 Atlantic style (4-4-2) diecast engine with sheet metal tender that has a single wire connecting the tender's 3rd rail pickups to the engine. The boxcar seems to be a #478 which is tinplate painted white on the sides with red painted roof and doors. The #482 flatcar with log load is tinplate and came with apple green paint or in black paint. The lighted caboose #484 is tinplate with red paint roof and sides and white painted ladder/railing front and back. All of these are nickle journals and latch-and-pin couplers.

Hope to contribute more about these in the future.

Hank

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Posted by 3railphillyoperator on Friday, October 17, 2008 1:42 PM

Hi all, this is a reply to three posts from June 7,8,9 of 2008.

The posts were Q&A about Lionel and AF  competition to go scale and I agree with the answers given. I would stress that Lionel 700E Hudson and the B6 switcher were absolute scale detailed 1:48 engines with triple action. The AF decision to go to 3/16th in O allowed them to produce scale length engines without the 72" diameter special track required of the scale Lionel items.

In my collection are the Northern, Pacific and Atlantic in working condition by AF. In addition I have the reproduction Lionel Gold Hudson Mellinium and the reproduction K-Line B-6. Both are, as were the origionals, by Lionel, higher detailed than the AF. But, the origional Lionels were equal to two weeks wages in price and the AF's were about one weeks wages. What is so great about AF? The lack of compromise as to length and the ability to operate on 040 track. This also shows in the passenger cars. No need for compression of length. An example of the difference is to see the Pacific style engines by Lionel and AF. Although Lionel is brutish in appearance, it lacks the correct front wheels and is 2-6-2. The AF K5 Pacific is like a thoroughbred - long and lean. Lionel in the late 30's, early & late 40's, & 50's did not have triple action on the Atlantics or Pacifics. AF had triple action. AF had triple action on the Northern, Hudson, Atlantic, and 0-8-0 yard goat.

Best,

Hank

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Saturday, October 18, 2008 3:56 PM

Hi Hank,

Sign - Welcome to the forum.  Its good to have you here.  Thanks for posting the information about your collection and about 3/16 American Flyer.  It was produced for such a short period of time, and yet it doesn't seem to get the attention that it deserves as the transition it was from Chicago Flyer's O gauge to Gilbert's S gauge.  If you have the capability to post some pictures of your equipment it would be great to see.

Thanks for posting and come and visit often.

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Posted by mersenne6 on Saturday, October 25, 2008 11:11 AM

 

   Updates

   With the new format the page index was rendered obsolete.  I've updated the index which is now on pp. 21 (note July 2021 - this too is obsolete).  I also went back and began the process of updating the pictures which underwent severe shrinkage.  Hopefully, sometime this weekend I'll be able to add some new text and pictures to this thread.

 

                                   Mersenne6

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Posted by kblester on Saturday, October 25, 2008 9:41 PM

Flyer and Gilbert Friends,

I know this item is not Pre War but I thought some here could point me in the right direction. A forum search did not give me many clues.

While cleaning out my Mom's basement today I found my American Flyer #312 engine (knuckle couplers) from my childhood. I long thought this was gone. Still in the original wrap and in a flooded basement I was surprised to see it free of rust or damage. The cars and accessories stored away from the engine have surface rust but should be OK. The cooler which was used to store track and switches looks as if it had filled with water at some point, and was not a happy sight. My Dad died in 1964, and I last ran these trains before 1969. I did make a track plan copy before I had to dismantle the platform before I got married in 1975. My Mom passed away this past July and I am very Happy she saved these trains for me. Another thing I found with the engine was a worn copy of the 1957 American Flyer catalog, and toward the back in the special car section was a note made by my Dad circling the Crane car, with a check mark and a big OK next to it. He never got to get that car for me, but for some unknown reason when my local train shop went out of business a few years ago the owner brought out that exact car and suggested I buy it for display on my Lionel platform. I didn't know why I wanted it but I bought it. Now I do. Who says parents don't watch out for you after they are gone.

Anyway I am thinking I may want to try and recreate the layout for my Grandsons. Does anyone have any thoughts on how hard it will be to get back into American Flyer after all these years.

Best Regards,

Ken

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Sunday, October 26, 2008 12:00 AM

Hi Ken,

Sign - Welcome    It is indeed amazing how toy trains can be woven into the fabric of your life and memories.  I am sure that there are many folks who will read your message that will have similar stories.  My trains from my childhood were both American Flyer S-gauge and prewar American Flyer O gauge. 

It will be very easy to get back into American Flyer.  There is a great deal of the vintage S gauge equipment available, although not nearly as much as there is Lionel equipment.  With a little effort, some hunting and careful attention to budgeting you could probably replace all of the damaged items from your childhood trains.  Or you can go the route of restoring them.

There is also a large amount of new Flyer made by Lionel currently if you don't want to shop the secondary market.

Once Sturgeon-Phish reads your note I am sure he will have some comments.  If you can do a search on his entries to the forum you will see his S-gauge empire.  He has managed to collect some very nice examples of the items from the era that you are interested in.

I think that you will be pleased at the smiles on your grandchildren's faces when they see the Flyer layout you will create, and my guess is that they will remind you of the smile on your Dad's face as he watched you play with your trains.

Northwoods Flyer

 

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Posted by Sturgeon-Phish on Sunday, October 26, 2008 9:36 AM

Hi Ken,

When I read your post it brought a smile.  As stated, trains interweave our lives and span generations.  The 312 is one of my favorites.  Is yours a Smoke in Tender (SIT) or Smoke in Boiler (SIB)?  Easy to tell, if there is a flexible tube (or a brass tube stub from the tender) between the loco and tender, you have a SIT, which means the smoke unit is in the tender.  If not you have a SIB with the smoke unit in the boiler.  What is cool about the SIB is when the loco is in neutral, the unit can sit and still produce smoke.  Very neat!

Track and switches are fairly easy and cheap to come by, to get your railroad started.  If you need help in getting it running there is lots of assistance and information available.

Thanks for sharing your story

Jim

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Posted by Sturgeon-Phish on Sunday, October 26, 2008 9:39 AM

Something like this:

Jim

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 11:48 AM

Jim,

What a great picture!  You could title it "Delight".

We have been a bit thin on pictures in this post recently.  I think there are a number of reasons for that, including learning to use the tools again and I have had some problems with Shutterfly lately.  So for today I decided to just post some pictures of trains.  I consider this my version of eye candy. Shock   The "sets" that I am posting were not necessarily cataloged.  The only thing they have in common is that the trucks in each picture all match each other.  Enjoy!  Smile

 
 
 
 
Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby,
 
Northwoods Flyer
 
 

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Posted by n1vets333 on Tuesday, November 4, 2008 6:14 AM

 

Here is a set I picked up this weekend. It has the  mechanican whistle you mentioned earlier in the post. I cleaned the wheels and pickups and she started running. Amazing. Any idea as to what this set is worth on the market, I would like to sell or trade it.

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Tuesday, November 4, 2008 7:56 AM

Hi n1vets333,

Sign - Welcome  to the thread.  As your research has already told you the set that you have was an uncataloged offering from American Flyer some time in the 1936-1938 era.  It first appeared around 1936.  The engine came in two versions; a wind up version (which had two styles of wind up mechanism) and an electric version.  The engine had two different styles of back, a rounded back that was meant for passenger sets and a square back that was intended for freight sets.  It appears that the engines were found with either type of back with either type of car.  I would guess that is a result of Flyer using up existing stock.  The cars that are in your set are also uncataloged.  They came in two varieties, with either four wheels or eight wheels.  If you scroll up a bit on this thread you will see some examples of the eight wheel cars.  These sets must have been pretty popular and affordable because of their lower price. They show up pretty frequently.  Most of the cars that I have observed are in a condition similar to yours, so I am guessing that they were well loved and played with.

As far as value is concerned: you know that they are worth at least what you paid for them.  I do most of my purchasing on eBay and I think that with the exposure that items get on there it is a pretty good resource for what current market values are.  When I consider buying an item I watch what the same item sells for in different auctions.  I also set in my own mind what I am willing to pay for the item and what condition I will accept.  I don't pay a great deal of attention to price guides.  I don't have an example of this engine in my collection. However, in the photo that I mentioned above with the eight wheel cars, I purchased all of the components individually on eBay during the last year, to assemble that "set". I doubt that I have more than $125.00 invested in the whole set.  I watched auctions for quite a while until I found cars in a condition that I was willing to have and at prices I was willing to pay.

They are a nice example of Flyer's lower priced cars.  Good luck with what ever you decide to do with them.

Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby,

Northwoods Flyer

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Posted by n1vets333 on Wednesday, November 5, 2008 4:21 AM

 Thank you for the response, they are a cool litle set, I might just end up keeping them, I actuallt bought them with a box full of ho passenger cars. I seen another hiawatha engine in one of the price guides and I thought I might have had a rare find on my hands. Overall this is a cool little set. Its amazing with a little cleaning how this little guy runs.

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Posted by RockIsland52 on Wednesday, November 5, 2008 7:29 AM

The Hiawatha is one of the more storied trains of the 1930s upper Midwest and represented one of the fastest steam engines ever built.  Just to get you started http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiawatha_(passenger_train)

I'd keep it and, because of its age, leave it unrestored.  But that's me.

Jack

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Thursday, November 6, 2008 7:53 AM

1927 Jeffersonian Set  #1306

In the 1927 catalog the top of the line Narrow Gauge set was the Jeffersonian

 
 
 
It was headed up by the 3015, which is classified as on of the large New York Central style box cab engines that Flyer marketed.
 
 
It only appeared this year and was made up of parts used in other engines marketed in previous years.  It uses the black on brass signs which were only used in the early years.
 
It uses a cast frame with great details like the sand barrels and hand rails.
 
 
 
The roof has unique cast in pantographs, bell, and headlights, even though the operating headlight itself is recessed in the front.
 
 
 
 
The Jeffersonian contained the 3000 baggage, classified as one of the Illini series.
 
 
The 3001 Illini pullman
 
 
and the 3001 Illini Observation.
 
 
 
 
Flyer referred to the color of the engine as thistle green.
 
 
Imagine laying on the living room floor on Christmas morning watching this beauty circle the tree.
 
 
Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby 
 
Northwoods Flyer
 
 
 
 

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Posted by mersenne6 on Saturday, November 8, 2008 9:40 PM

The Other Freight Cars IV 

 

Log Cars/Flat Cars/Machinery Cars
 

 5 ½ inch cars   241/M241 Log Car 

 

  The basic log car was introduced in 1910 and listed as being 5 inches long.  In the 1914 catalog this dimension was changed to 5 1/2.  The car was offered with and without a lumber load and was cataloged through 1924.  The lumber consisted of 4 separate pieces held in place with wires that attached to the side stakes. 

 

 

The second car of this length was #1141 which was cataloged from 1925-1930.  It too was black with metal stakes and a 4 log load.
 

  6 ½ inch cars #1106/1146 

 

  The first cars were #1106 (4 wheel) and #1146 (8 wheel).  #1106 was cataloged from 1928-1932 and #1146 was cataloged from 1928 to 1929.  #1146 had a single piece of wood milled to look like a stack of lumber.  This piece of wood is “held” in place with retaining wires attached to the side stakes.

 

 #1146 

 

   Note the solid piece of wood.   

 

#3006   

   Four wheel car Cataloged 1933-35.  The car has a black frame with brass journals and a single brake wheel.  The wood load intially consisted of individual pieces of lumber again held in place with retaining wires. Later versions had a single piece of wood cut to simulate a wood load.

 

 

 

#3006
 
 
    Note the individual pieces of wood.  

 

  #3046 

  Eight wheel car cataloged 1930-32, 1934-35.  Car came either with no wood, with separate pieces of wood or a single piece of wood milled to look like a lumber load.  The wood loads were held in place by wire retainers.  The uprights had a single crosspiece.  The crosspiece was painted red on the black cars with a rubber stamping of either “A.F.L.” or “3046”

   This car came in black, blue, orange, or green.  The blue, orange, and green cars were decaled “American Flyer” on the crosspiece.

 

Blue car - individual pieces of wood.   
  
 
9 ½ inch cars

  #3006  

     Yes, two different cars – same number.  The first 9 ½ inch car was cataloged from 1924-27.  It came with three different types of loads. The first version consisted of individual pieces of finished lumber - sanded and varnished. The second version consists of 6 pieces of unfinished wood that run the length of the car and the third is the same as the second but the pieces are short like the finished lumber load. 
 

 Finished lumber

Unfinished lumber - full car length

 

#3206/3216 Machinery car/Log car

   The machinery car was cataloged from 1928-35 whereas the log car was cataloged from 1930-38.  Except for identifying numbers the basic cars are identical.  They came with either one or two crosspieces. The log car has lumber (unfinished individual pieces) and wire retainers whereas the machinery car doesn’t.  However, as can be seen in the picture below, Flyer would make do with what was on hand.  The car has brass plates #3206, lumber, and wire.

 

   

Note the two crosspieces
 

  #406 

 Cataloged 1939.  Similar to #3216 except it had link and pin couplers.  Lumber load was a single piece of wood milled to look like a lumber load. Again the car could come with one or two crosspieces.

  

 

 Note the single crosspiece

 
 
#482 Gilbert 3/16" Lumber car
 
 
  This car is usually found with a load of logs however, it was also issued with a load of lumber. Both cars were identified as #482.
 
 
 

 

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Monday, November 10, 2008 10:23 PM

The Other Freight Cars IV  - Addendum A

Here are some variations on the #3046  6.5" log cars.

This is the blue version that mersenne6 shows in his post.  Mine is quite dark and usually looks almost black.  It depends on the light that you view it in.

 
It has 3046 rubber stamped on the bottom.
 
 
This is the orange version with decal
 
 
It has a rubberstamping on the bottom and a patent decal
 
 
It also has the wood load that is one piece scribed to look like individual timbers.
 
 
A second orange version with a rubberstamped gold "American Flyer" on the side piece.
 
 
 
This version has the individual timbers, both of the orange versions are missing their wire tire downs.
 
 
In 1939 the 6.5" cars appeared in the catalog for the last time.  They were given new Type XII trucks and the Type X curly cue couplers.  The log car was given a new number too, it became the #228.  This one is missing its load.
 
 
 
Here are the four variations in my collection.
 
 
Northwoods Flyer
 
 

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Posted by mersenne6 on Saturday, November 15, 2008 4:39 PM

The Other Freight Cars V  

The Caboose 

 

Lithographed Cars
 
  Flyers initial set offering in 1910 did not include a caboose.   The 1914 Catalog shows a #528 Bing caboose with NYC markings.  According to Greenberg this version might have been offered earlier.  In any event neither Greenberg nor I have ever seen an original boxed set with this car.

 

 

 Catalog cut from 1914
 
 
 

#1111 – 5 ½ inch 

   In 1916 Flyer introduced #1111 in IC livery.  The litho treatment, cupola location, and other aspects of the car varied over the years.  The car was offered from 1916 – 1932.

 

  #1111 version with centered cupola
 
 

 

 
Comparison between Bing and Flyer
 
 
 

#1111 version with off center cupola and brass hand rails and ladders.   

      

  In 1917 Flyer took the basic litho of its B&O boxcar, added a roof with a cupola, and called this concoction a caboose – this was a one year only item.
 
 
 

  #1114/1117 – 6 ½ inch 

 

   Flyer introduced the #1114 in the 1919 catalog.  The car was lithoed with either #1114 or #1117.  The number difference was supposed to identify the 4 wheel and the 8 wheel configurations but, as was so often the case with Flyer, you can find 4 and 8 wheel versions of the caboose in either number.  The car, in various forms, was cataloged from 1919-1935.  Roof colors can be black, brown, green, orange, or peacock and it can be either smooth or ribbed.  The cupola can be found in red or brown litho (and yes, there can be a mismatch between the caboose litho and the cupola litho) or all enamel and it can either be found mounted as centered or offset on the roof.  The later versions can also be found with stamped brass handrails applied to the sides.

 

 Earliest version with high Marklin style trucks  

 Later version with litho brown cupola 

 
Brown cupola and embossed green roof. 
 

      #1127 

  Uncataloged caboose 1936-1937.  Available in either 4 or eight wheel.

 

 
Enameled Cars
  

 #3004/3014/3017/232 

 3004 – 4 wheel red body, roof, cupola, and cupola roof.  “American Flyer” decals across the letterboard and two smaller “American Flyer” decals below the windows.  Caboose is lighted.

 

 3014 – 4 wheel 1930-32, 1934-35.  4 wheel red body.  Body has embossing on sides and has vertical brass handrails.  Roof and cupola can be red or orange.  Markings can be either decals or silver stamped on sides with the car number rubber stamped on the bottom.

 

3017 – 1930-32, 34-35, 38.  Eight wheel car roof and cupola colors can be red, green, or orange.  Markings can be either decals or silver stampings and the car number can be found rubber stamped on the underside.

 

 Green roof and silver rubber stamping 

 

Orange roof and rubber stamping   

 Rubber stamp marking on underside of caboose.  

 
232 – late version of #3017 1939 only.
 

  3201/3211/411 - 9 ½ inch cars  

   All of these cars share the same stampings.  The differences are trucks, couplers, and markings which can be either brass plates, decals, or rubber stampings.  This caboose is usually found lighted. 

 
3201 – 1932 - non-illuminated, red body and darker red roof and/or cupola.
3211 – 1928-1938 – illuminated, red body and darker red roof, also red body and matching red roof.
411 - 1939-1940  - illuminated, red body and roof.

 

 Early version brass number tags darker red cupola  

 Later version decals and single color caboose and cupola. 

 

    

#536 – 5 inch 1933-1935 – Hummer construction.  This car came with or without a cupola.

 

 

 

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Friday, November 21, 2008 10:18 PM

The Other Freight Cars -  Addendum B

As mersenne6 has illustrated there were a number of variation to the 3206/3216 Machinery/Log car:

 

"#3206/3216 Machinery car/Log car

  The machinery car was cataloged from 1928-35 whereas the log car was cataloged from 1930-38.  Except for identifying numbers the basic cars are identical.  They came with either one or two crosspieces. The log car has lumber (unfinished individual pieces) and wire retainers whereas the machinery car doesn’t.  However, as can be seen in the picture below, Flyer would make do with what was on hand.  The car has brass plates #3206, lumber, and wire.

    "

Greenberg lists 10 different variations of the log car and 3 variations of the machinery car.

Here are a few additional variations; let me post them in what I think is chronological order:

This version is similar to the one mersenne6 posted above, exept that it has two "American Flyer Lines" brass tabs.

Note the two brake wheels and type VII trucks

 
It is rubber stamped on the bottom with 3216 and the inspector number
 
 
Here is a version with red crosspieces, two brake wheels and type VIII trucks
 
 
 
This one was rubberstamped by inspector 4
 
Here are the two versions (green and orange) with one crosspiece, one brakewheel and type VIII trucks
 
 
 
As mersenne6 noted the 3206 machinery car is basically the same as the lumber car without a load.  I believe that this is a machinery car because there is almost no wear to the stantions that hold the lumber.  The only way to really tell is if the car is rubber stamped.  Unfortunately mine is not rubber stamped.
 
The 1939 versions have type XII trucks and type X couplers (the curly cue coupler).  It came in both green and orange.
 
 
 
 
When Gilbert took over production they changed the number of the log car to #406.  The couplers changed to the link and pin version.  This example has a later knuckle coupler that my father put on instead of the original link and pin.  It has two crosspieces.
 
 
Another view of the original box.
 
 
The 406 also came with one crosspiece.  This one has lost the cast links but still has the pins.
 
 
You will notice that some of the cars illustrated here have lost the wire tire downs.  I think that is a testimony to the fact that they had great play value and children really did play with them.
 
Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby
 
Northwoods Flyer
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Monday, December 1, 2008 6:06 PM

The Other Freight Cars  -  Addendum C

Wide Gauge  Machinery Car and Log Car

American Flyer had similar cars in their Wide Gauge Line.  The Machinery Car was numbered 4022 and the Log Car was numbered 4023.  According to Greenberg there are several variations of both.  There are variations in blue and some marked for Nation Wide Lines which is the name that Flyer sold trains under through J.C.Penny.

This is the 4022 Machinery Car

 
It has two brass tags on the turquoise blue side bars.  One showing "Built by American Flyer Lines"
 
 
And the other showing the number of the car.  
 
 
Notice that this car has one brake wheel with a black stanchion, brass U shaped steps, and flexible trucks.
 
 
The 4023 Log Car has orange side bars and two identical brass plates per side.  It also has two brake wheels with orange stanchions.
 
 
Notice that the U shaped step is painted grey on the Log Cars.  It also has fixed trucks.
 
 
Identifying numbers are rubber stamped on the bottom of the 4023.  It also has the patent information decal present.
 
 
The lumber load is a solid block of wood that is scribed to look like individual timbers, just like on the O gauge version.
 
 
Here are a couple of photos to show the size comparison between the Narrow (O gauge, 9 1/2 inches) and Wide Gauge (14 inches) Machinery car,
 
 
 
And the Narrow (O gauge 6 1/2" and 9 1/2") and Wide Gauge (14 inch) Lumber Cars.
 
 
 
 
Once again you can see how Flyer played with variations on a theme over the years of production.
 
Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby,
 
Northwoods Flyer
 
 
 
 

The Northwoods Flyer Collection

of

American Flyer Trains

"The Toy For the Boy"

  • Member since
    January 2008
  • From: Duluth, Minnesota
  • 1,961 posts
Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Monday, December 8, 2008 9:57 PM

Set #1220   from  1926

The other day I started going through some boxes looking for items to put on the Christmas layout and I ran across this set that I picked up a short time ago.

 
It appeared to be an original set.  The colors on the 1218 Steeple Cab and the three cars are a very good match.  The amount of wear on the cars and engine is consistent across all of them.  The units also have the same garter loop couplers.
 
 
With mersenne6's help we identified this set as #1220 from the 1925 catalog.  I don't have the catalogs going back that far but mersenne was kind enough to do some research for me.
 
The catalog lists the set as having the 1218 Steeple cab engine
 
 
 
 
1205 baggage
1306 pullman
1207 observation
 
 
The coaches are lighted.  They have an interesting method of lighting which involves a track pickup with a wire running to a Fahnstock clip in the floor of the car.
 
 
I think it will make a fun set running around the Christmas tree this year.
 
 
Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby,
 
Northwoods Flyer
 
 

The Northwoods Flyer Collection

of

American Flyer Trains

"The Toy For the Boy"

  • Member since
    January 2008
  • From: Duluth, Minnesota
  • 1,961 posts
Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Wednesday, December 10, 2008 1:56 PM

New Jeffersonian set   1928-1931

One of the things that I enjoy about having a collection is going through all the boxes stored under the train table and finding things I only barely remember having.  Each time I open a box it is a little like Christmas.  I had that experience recently as I was looking for items to display for the Christmas layout.  The set pictured in the entry above produced that kind of experience.  Of course I couldn't just stop there.  I also came across some other "goodies"  including this set:

This is the New Jeffersonian  that Flyer cataloged from 1928 thru 1931.

 
It replaced the Jeffersonian set containing a 3015 and the Illini cars which is pictured a few entries back.  This set has the #3115 box cab electric engine,
 
 
 
 
and the 9 1/2 inch enameled passenger cars.  There are a number of variations of these cars.  I believe these are some of the early ones.  They all have "Golden State"  plates above the windows and the individual brass plates identifying each car.
 
3280 Baggage
 
 
3281 Pullman
 
 
3282 Observation
 
 
It is missing its "Flyer Lines" end tab on the observation platform.
 
 
I really enjoy this set.  I think of it as a younger sibling to Flyer's Wide Gauge President's Special in the same colors.  I keep hoping that if I feed it well and take good care of it that it will grow up into a full size President's Special.
 
Ah well, I guess its still good to have Christmas dreams and wishes.
 
 
Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby,
 
Northwoods Flyer
 

The Northwoods Flyer Collection

of

American Flyer Trains

"The Toy For the Boy"

  • Member since
    December 2007
  • 32 posts
Posted by QueensNY on Thursday, December 11, 2008 8:41 PM

Northwood,

would you know where one would be able to get a brush plate fot a 4692 standard gauge Af?

thanks

  • Member since
    January 2008
  • From: Duluth, Minnesota
  • 1,961 posts
Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Saturday, December 13, 2008 9:14 AM

Greetings QueensNY,

Unfortunately I am not a good resource for finding parts for American Flyer items.  I have not done any repair or restoration on items in my collection. I am waiting for my retirement years to do that.  I know that there are parts suppliers that other forum members have used.  Eric Trickel has a catalog of items, and I have that, but I didn't see the part you are looking for.  You might consider starting another thread with this question to catch the attention of other forum members.

 Good Luck in your search,

Northwoods Flyer

The Northwoods Flyer Collection

of

American Flyer Trains

"The Toy For the Boy"

  • Member since
    October 2008
  • 7 posts
Posted by 3railphillyoperator on Saturday, December 13, 2008 10:07 AM

Hi All,

 

I joined this group awile back and have enjoyed the informative postings. Recently, the name Eric Trickle was mentioned as a supplier of American Flyer parts. Can anyone supply his address and if there is an e-mail or .com site for his goods?

My specialty is in 3/16th O and have suffered long waits at my local hobby shop for simple items like coupler repairs. Hopping to speed the process.

Hank Betz

Warrington, PA

  • Member since
    January 2008
  • From: Duluth, Minnesota
  • 1,961 posts
Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Saturday, December 13, 2008 1:14 PM

Hi Hank,

I'm glad you are enjoying the postings. I have Eric Trickel's Replacement Parts for PreWar Trains  -  Spring 2008  Catalog.  He has two pages of parts for 3/16" O Gauge equipment.    His address is:

541 North Charlotte Street                                                                                                              

Pottstown PA  19464

email:  TRICKELCASTPARTS@ YAHOO.COM

As I mentioned above I am not a knowledgeable source for replacement parts.  There may be other suppliers that other folks on the forum may be aware of.

Northwoods Flyer

The Northwoods Flyer Collection

of

American Flyer Trains

"The Toy For the Boy"

  • Member since
    December 2007
  • 32 posts
Posted by QueensNY on Sunday, December 14, 2008 12:36 AM

thanks for the response northwoods. I will send him an e-mail and see if he has it. If not i start a new post.

  • Member since
    January 2008
  • From: Duluth, Minnesota
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Posted by Northwoods Flyer on Thursday, December 18, 2008 9:16 AM

1938 Christmas List

In 1938 if you had the American Flyer Catalog you might have added the No.2 Freight set to your list for Santa

 
It was a sharp looking set and had some fun cars in it.  And the princely sum of $5.95 made every one of its 45" even more attractive.
 
 
You probably would not have noticed that your favorite train company was now owned by someone else and that your trains were coming from Connecticut instead of Chicago.  You might have noticed that the newer models of trains shown at the front of the catalog looked different from the ones you had seen there over the last couple of Christmases.  You may not have noticed that the trains were travelling on a different type of wheels because the track looked the same.
 
All of that would have faded into the background when you opened that big heavy box on Christmas morning and discovered this waiting for you:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
One thought might be on your mind:  "Its good to be a kid"
 
 
1938 - A very good year
 
Enjoying the World's Greatest Hobby
 
Northwoods Flyer
 
 

The Northwoods Flyer Collection

of

American Flyer Trains

"The Toy For the Boy"

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