Some Random Classic Pics perhaps worthy of Discussion

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, April 3, 2020 9:52 AM

Overmod

 

 
Flintlock76
They didn't save any of them, woe worth the day!

 

Although I keep hoping the Koreans did.

 

Oh yeah.  Hope springs eternal that K1 they sent to Korea is still over there waiting to be found, but so far there's been no luck for anyone who's gone looking.    

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, April 3, 2020 7:06 AM

Flintlock76
They didn't save any of them, woe worth the day!

Although I keep hoping the Koreans did.

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, April 3, 2020 6:40 AM

Flintlock76
Poor old Jawn Henry.  Incredibly powerful, but "buggy."  The bugs could have been worked out of it...

It could be argued that if Westinghouse hadn't dropped one of the generators during production and subsequently failed to 'make the damage good' the design might have been more of a success.  In Louis Newton's coverage ("Tale of a Turbine") he repeatedly mentions this as a source of major issues.

4500 nominal HP is ridiculously small for a locomotive intended for relatively slow-speed coal traffic; conversely, it's inadequate to reach the nominal 65mph speed for 'merchandise time freight' that Baldwin sold N&W on.  (Again Newton has some comments, acerbic at times, on the honesty involved with that claim.)

The real 'nail in the coffin' as far as I'm concerned was that N&W managed to damage a significant number of the hexapole motors just in the very short period of testing that found the locomotive inadequate compared to even the range of contemporary steam alternatives.  It takes a LOT of trying to kill one of those things.  For comparison this is no more motors, and no more available input power, than an ABA set of contemporary RF16s; while there was certainly much to complain about regarding the reliability of those locomotives, their traction motors (and much else in their electrical gear) would be generally 'above reproach'.

Diseasels were certainly not a 'done deal' even in the days Baldwin developed the Essl 'alternative to a 4-8-4' -- properly 6000hp in a reasonable-length carbody with high-speed 'electric locomotive' underframe -- before WWII.  It could be -- and has been -- argued that had there been no war, and no actions to recover from it without depression like 1920-21, steam might have remained more tenable as a motive-power 'choice' longer, and conversely that effective progression to second-generation horsepower and reliability taken longer to reach.  Personally I find the practical advantages of internal-combustion power, net of practical financing considerations for capitalist railroads, pretty reasonable and pretty compelling even at first-generation levels.  (See the Big Little Railroad discussion of why first-generation engines of considerable power were used on commuter trains...)

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, April 2, 2020 8:37 PM

Poor old Jawn Henry.  Incredibly powerful, but "buggy."  The bugs could have been worked out of it, but the N&W couldn't interest any other 'roads in the concept, and at the end of the day it didn't do the job appreciably better than a Y6b did, so there was no point in persuing it.  

And of course, everyone knew the "dismals" were coming anyway, it was just a matter of time.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, April 2, 2020 8:12 PM

Too bad this is silent:

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, April 2, 2020 8:09 PM

Overmod
The turbine, on the other hand, was TE-rrific and Number One!

OY!  Laugh

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, April 2, 2020 6:41 PM

Woo-hoo!  One o' them big, gutsy Erie Pacifics!  The Erie never bought any Hudsons or Northerns, they didn't think they needed them and for the most part, they were right.  They didn't save any of them, woe worth the day!

"If you're going through hell, keep going!"  Good old Winston!

And I wish I knew who came up with this one:

"Before you can see the light at the end of the tunnel, you have to walk through the darkness."  

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, April 2, 2020 5:43 PM

I liked the pic and it was a follow up to the GN Z class. All articulated locos are Yuge. Maybe we should save Yuge exclusively for the Y class.

The TE-1 is not a slacker in the Yuge dept. Suppose in coal turbines it was TErrific and No. 1 . Better if they ordered the 40 or 50 as was recommended.

The basic idea of this thread is just to maybe have a discussion if what's shown is deemed of interest. Then we can get into all the technical details with peoples in the know. 

Maybe it's a lame-o concept. If so just consider it an expanded picture of the day and hope it's an image you like or haven't seen previously. 

Aside---Distance on line learning off to a rocky start.., the product is good, the students are missing!! New phenomenon called 'No Surrender Bender" going on.  

As Winston Churchill stated " If you're going thru hell, keep going"

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, April 2, 2020 4:50 PM

Miningman
6)  N&W Jawn Henry .. nice pic! It's Yuge too

I cannot beLIEVE you missed it!  It's the simple-expansion 2-8-8-2 that was Yuge.  The turbine, on the other hand, was TE-rrific and Number One!

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, April 2, 2020 4:15 PM

Well they sure tried with Aquarama. A very sad loss. 

Some more goodies:

1) July 13, 1955. No.1 The Super Continental at Armstrong, Ontario. Diesel A&B broke down and 6259 was hurried into service. Shop workers all over it! To the rescue! Can't hold up No. 1.

 

2)  An odd doubleheader. NYC FM 4517 and a Hudson haul at passenger consist. No date given but the location is Jackson, Michigan.

 

 

3)  In busier and more prosperous days, here is The Ambassador for Montreal headed by 4-8-2 4117 nicknamed 'Hercules'.  Long train!

Boston North Station, Aug. 1947

 

4) A Penny/Flintlock Special. The Erie in Cleveland in 1948. Big power, lots of bridges.

 

5) Great Northern Z Class.  Yuge! 

 

6)  N&W Jawn Henry .. nice pic! It's Yuge too!

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, March 28, 2020 9:44 PM

Somewhere around here I have a brochure from the Aquarama which plied the waves from the late '50s until September, 1962. I recall seeing it docked at the E. 9th St. Pier in Cleveland, when I was aged five or six.

Until I find it this YouTube video will have to do —

(You may want to turn the "soundtrack" down a bit. I did.)

Also —

https://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/766

 

Follow the Flickr link here and see the brochure that this contributor has in an album:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/34370769@N07/albums/72157623040787976

 Aquarama postcard by John Rochon, on Flickr

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, March 28, 2020 7:55 PM

Cleveland Ferries also called on Port Dover and the Bessemer & Lake Erie ran coal hoppers across Erie to Port Dover CNR and of course my all time favourite the Ferry between Ashtabula and Port Burwell.

There is still some kind of summer service to Port Stanley. Heck of a summer spot! 

A six hour car ride vs. a 40 minute to hour and half by boat across the mysterious Lake Erie. None of it should have disappeared but much is lost. 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, March 28, 2020 7:49 PM

MidlandMike

Were those boats coming from Sandusky, or were they coming from places like Cleveland, or maybe other places?

 

Cleveland to Cedar Point was a very popular run for the lake steamers.

Of course Detroit, Toledo, Buffalo and other points sent a lot of tourist traffic to Cedar Point by lake steamer.

I couldn't find a good pic of a steamer docked at the Euclid Beach Park pier, this is in fact the ONLY one I found:

So here's Glenn Curtiss flying over it.

And 2 Humphreys in a row boat.

Whistling

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, March 28, 2020 7:20 PM

Well this led to something I never saw before!  Check this out:

The photo description reads:

 

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, March 28, 2020 9:42 AM

The pier was also served by Lake Shore Electric! The spur ended just short of the pier.  Interline service from Mansfield was offered from 1909-1912, and through trains from Cleveland and Detroit brought passengers as well, with summer excursion trains common until the 1930s.

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, March 28, 2020 8:18 AM

Recall taking a ferry from a slip West of downtown Sandusky to Put-in-Bay on a vacation in 1972.

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, March 27, 2020 10:28 PM
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Posted by MidlandMike on Friday, March 27, 2020 10:05 PM

Were those boats coming from Sandusky, or were they coming from places like Cleveland, or maybe other places?

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, March 27, 2020 9:15 PM

That's the spirit Penny! Can't beat Lake Erie on both sides! I can smell the fries and malt vinegar right through the computer...... And all the glorious places to dine in splendour. CASO on the other side and a host of Electric Lines. A very rich fulfilling life. 

Was worried I wasn't going to get a single comment so thanks for that too Penny. Lordy I miss Lake Erie in the summer, actually any time. 

Celery bread here I come! 

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, March 27, 2020 8:21 PM

Oh wow, steam trains, steam ships, what a fun way to get around! 

The sun, the sky, and a whiff of coal smoke to round it all off.  Big Smile

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Posted by Penny Trains on Friday, March 27, 2020 8:11 PM

Miningman
5) Those were the days. Sandusky passengers could transfer to steamers on Lake Erie. Something Overmod has lamented is gone now.

A closer look.

Looking the other way:

This was the pier at the park:

 +

Non postcard version:

I like this one:

This one's great too:

The pier was destroyed when on June 28, 1924 a massive tornado tore through Sandusky.

This is the "new pier" built after.

Some of the regular steamers.  The A Wherle Jr:

The Arrow:

The Goodtime:

And the Eastland:

 

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, March 26, 2020 11:27 PM

1)  Last train on Division St. in Evansville, Indiana. July 31, 1973.

Four car L&N consist , aboard the Mayor and other city officials. Street running replaced by a new by pass.

 

2)  Union Pacific M-10000 .. in Buffalo of all places. Sure got around!

 

3)  Now where oh where is my engine?  Very busy! A scene we are lucky to have captured on film as we will never see the sights of this again.

 

4)  South Goa, India.  Train crosses over incredible waterfall. 

 

5)  Those were the days. Sandusky passengers could transfer to steamers on Lake Erie. Something Overmod has lamented is gone now.

 

6)  St. Petersburg Florida 1954.  Passenger trains ran through the streets of St. Petersburg causing massive traffic jams! I don't even see any gates! 

 

7)  Juniata Scale - Weigh Instruments 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 1:43 PM

 

Amazing what is to be found out there.

Thank You.
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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 11:52 AM

Erik_Mag and all--  Another pic of Fifth St. Layfayette, Indiana but this time back in the day with steam. That must have been quite the sight.

Crew has the smoke under control. 

  

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 10:55 AM

M636C
What on earth is the locomotive?

If I'm not mistaken, we had a fairly recent thread involving either this locomotive or one very like it -- now painted white, and in some danger of being scrapped.  Perhaps this jogs someone's better memory.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 12:50 AM

M636C---,   This is what I could find.

It served in Port Ivory, Staten Island, until 1991.

It was called The Mutt. Had no number.

It had an Alco frame with Blunt trucks, from a S1 or S3.

It was built by Chattahoochie Locomotives in Conyers, Georgia   

 

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, March 23, 2020 11:25 PM

Flintlock-- Yes! ...the photo caption called the train 'The Dundee' I didn't include it in the description. 

Midland Mike-- Not sure where, no help from the photo, just a date 1948.   Someone here will know. 

M636-- No help from the photo. Still searching 

Erik_Mag-- Always cool when you know the exact location and you've been there recognized from a photo years later! 

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Monday, March 23, 2020 11:11 PM

Miningman

 

3)  Fifth St. Layfayette, Indiana.  The Monon is the Big Man on Campus!

 

My son, the Purdue freshman, thinks he knows where that picture was taken. I crossed Fifth street several times last October when my wife and were visiting him. FWIW, Purdue is across the river in West Lafayette.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, March 23, 2020 10:12 PM

Ah yes, the old Erie mainline through Passaic NJ.  It lasted up to around 1960 or so, then instead of a convenience for train riders it became a royal PITA, so it was re-routed outside of the downtown area.  

But at the time it sure was dramatic, wasn't it?

Monroe Street in Passaic?  That's the Erie's old Dundee (industrial) Spur, abandoned for good in 2019 after the last customer left.  

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