Some Random Classic Pics perhaps worthy of Discussion

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Posted by SD70Dude on Saturday, September 12, 2020 6:39 PM

We have Rexall drug stores up here, though the current company is unrelated to the historic American brand.  Until 2016 they were owned by Daryl Katz, who also owns the NHL's Edmonton Oilers, and the arena (originally the Northlands Coliseum) was appropriately named Rexall Place.  The team has since moved to a new venue. 

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Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, September 12, 2020 6:06 PM

Sure.  You can get Rexall products at Dollar General.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, September 11, 2020 8:24 PM

Overmod

 

 
Miningman
based on the N&W 4-8-4 J 

 

All you need is a white decal script Rexall on the side and a free coupon for Trojans clipped to the tender.

 

 

Surprise  Indifferent  Embarrassed  

And that's enough of that!

Ah yes, one of Williams "Variations On A Class J."  In addition to the N&W prototype, numbered for some inexplicable reason "746,"  Williams also did the locomotive in B&O "Royal Blue," CNR green, a New Haven scheme, even a PRR version.  All great looking O gauge locomotives, but discontinued now.  

OK, Williams numbered their N&W Class J 746 to match the Lionel version, but it still doesn't make sense, at least to me.   Hmm

However, anticipating Overmod's suggestion, back in 2017 Mike's Train House DID put out a Rexall Train!  And here it is...

http://www.mthtrains.com/railking/spotlight/12_2017/j   

Anyone besides me remember Rexall?  

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, September 11, 2020 7:49 PM

Miningman
based on the N&W 4-8-4 J 

All you need is a white decal script Rexall on the side and a free coupon for Trojans clipped to the tender.

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, September 11, 2020 7:28 PM

based on the N&W 4-8-4 J 

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, September 11, 2020 7:00 PM

I'll just submit this image....

The Williams "Blue Goose" in O gauge.  Bang Head

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Posted by Jones1945 on Friday, September 11, 2020 9:34 AM

You guys are right. The color of the Blue Goose is a bit too "feminine" and too cute for my taste. Some elements at the front end are inconsistent and look irrelevant. The bullet nose is supposed to be the focus of the whole design, but it is just a generic bullet nose design. If Santa Fe invited another industrial designer to redesign it, he or she would have redesigned the whole thing. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, September 10, 2020 5:10 PM

Nice effort Mr. Jones!  But I agree with Vince, something  just doesn't look right.  That sky blue color?  

Maybe a Pullman Green color overall for the locomotive, accented with a Dulux Gold running board as a dividing line between the boiler and the running gear?  Pullman Green would match the locomotive to the contemporary passenger consist, the Dulux Gold would add a bit of "flash."

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, September 10, 2020 4:28 PM

Now that's a lot of work to make one Ug-la locomotive. The non streamlined version is much better. Maybe it's that baby blue, I dunno. 

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Posted by Jones1945 on Thursday, September 10, 2020 12:25 PM

Overmod
Locomotive 3765, the first of the true high-speed 4-8-4s (as opposed to the converted 3751 class) was explicitly designed to be streamlined, probably along the same lines as the Blue Goose, and in fact was delivered with stainless-steel handrails and a patch 'without rivets' on the tender where the stainless-steel band would go.  Larry Brashear said the streamlining represented about 17,000lb that could not be fitted into the rather tight design specs ...

Here is a lazy Photoshoped pics showing what a streamlined 3765 Class might have looked like. Edited from a photo of the 3460 Class Hudson, details are wrong.

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, September 9, 2020 8:09 AM

rcdrye

Right about the E3/E6 units (missed the number indicators - E1s had slits).  If I were going to make a bet on the year I'd go with 1946-1948 - the dual-service F3s/F7s hadn't entirely replaced the Es on transcons.  I'm going by the roof vents on the coaches to call it the El Capitan.  The Grand Canyon has a lot of lightweights as well.

 

The E3/E6 has three small radiator grilles on the side, while the E1 had two large vents. But the roof vents in the photo identified as the Super Chief look the same to me, particularly on the leading car.

But the shot with the 4-8-4 is most likely post war since there are no headlight shields. The two heavyweight cars on the "Grand Canyon" are probably baggage and RPO cars.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, September 9, 2020 7:08 AM

Right about the E3/E6 units (missed the number indicators - E1s had slits).  If I were going to make a bet on the year I'd go with 1946-1948 - the dual-service F3s/F7s hadn't entirely replaced the Es on transcons.  I'm going by the roof vents on the coaches to call it the El Capitan.  The Grand Canyon has a lot of lightweights as well.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, September 9, 2020 2:16 AM

Locomotive 3765, the first of the true high-speed 4-8-4s (as opposed to the converted 3751 class) was explicitly designed to be streamlined, probably along the same lines as the Blue Goose, and in fact was delivered with stainless-steel handrails and a patch 'without rivets' on the tender where the stainless-steel band would go.  Larry Brashear said the streamlining represented about 17,000lb that could not be fitted into the rather tight design specs ... frankly I never really missed it as I'm not a particular fan of that Mae West look on locomotives.

Interestingly it does not appear that considerable streamlining was going to be applied to the proposed duplex locomotive.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 10:35 PM

Miningman

6) I'm certain most have seen this pic before, but it's worth revisiting. A moment in time that should still be the norm and with us.  Everything makes sense and is perfect. 

I love #6. ATSF's 4-8-4s were fascinating! They were some durable long-distance runners that were reliable and good looking. I wish there was a streamlined version (not the Blue Goose design) of them, though they already looked good enough without streamlining. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 9:47 PM

Thanks for that magnificent photograph Peter!  The quality's so incredible it could have been shot yesterday.  Thank God for Kodachrome!

Thanks for the info 'Dude.  Spark arrestors?  Sot THAT'S what they are!  And can you imagine open auto-racks in this day and age?  I shudder to think what the cars would look like once they got from Point A to Point B.  

The "Tropicana Train" is enough of a nightmare as it is, taggers find those big white carsides an irresistable canvas.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 9:11 PM

Open autoracks lasted a little longer in Canada:

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=21864

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 9:10 PM

Flintlock76

More cool pictures!  Let's see now...

Photo 1)  Colorful!  You suppose the 'Dude's in the lead unit?

Wrong railway for me.  More likely NDG, but it's the wrong part of the country for him. 

Flintlock76

Photo 2)  I like the script myself, and why not use it?  If it's painted on using a stencil (and probably was) it's just as easy to do a block lettering.  I miss the beaver though.

Sign painting used to be a real art.  Most of the complex railroad logos and lettering were done by hand, with the aid of stencils and 'pounce patterns', which have many small holes punched in them to outline the letters or logo.  The pattern would be held up to the surface and powdered chalk scattered along it, some chalk would get through the holes and form an outline, which the painter would use to guide his hand.  Any remaining chalk was easily wiped off once the paint dried.

Flintlock76

Photo 3)  Fifty years old and it looks ready for fifty more!  But it won't get the chance, damn it all. 

A number of small to medium size designs from the first generation of superheated locomotives of the early 1900s fell into a sort of 'sweet spot' for branchline and local service.  They were light enough to tread on 60 lb rail and unimproved track, yet powerful enough to handle the usual tonnage of a branchline freight, and the passenger engines were also capable of 50+ mph with a short train, allowing them to keep pace on mainlines. 

Flintlock76

Photo 4)  The exhaust stacks are interesting, to say the least.  Looks like you could play Bach's "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor" on 'em with some careful throttle manipulation.

They're spark arrestors.  Those roots-blown EMD engines can give a real show when worked hard after idling for a few days......

Flintlock76

Photo 5)  Looks like it was a nice place until the end came.  Sic transit gloria mundi. 

Not much runs on the former Algoma Central line these days, as was alluded to in the Huron Central thread over on the other forum. 

Flintlock76

Photo 6)  Wow.  Oh, wow.  The way things ought to be all right.  AND, put some snow on the ground and you've got a perfect Christmas card!

Stainless steel and that Warbonnet scheme go great together.  Probably the best diesel paint scheme ever. 

And look at those boxcars in the background.  Not a speck of graffiti to be seen!

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 8:28 PM

rcdrye

6) Knew I should have taken that left at Albuquerque...  Train on left with E1s is almost certainly train 21 the all-coach El Capitan, due out at 4:50PM.  Train on the right behind 3784 is train 123 the Grand Canyon northern section due out at 5 PM. The Super Chief just left town a few minutes before.  Times may be off since the schedule shifted a bit over the years, but not the meeting place.

 

I don't think the El Capitan was that big a train, even during the war. Otto Perry's photos tend to show a single E1 A unit and six or seven cars.

This is what the Super Chief looked like (on 4x5 Kodachrome!)

https://www.shorpy.com/node/83?size=_original#caption

Real colour is always better, even if the stainless steel looks dirtier...

And the locomotives are E3s or E6s in both photos...

Maybe the El Capitan was delayed?

Peter

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, September 8, 2020 7:46 AM

6) Knew I should have taken that left at Albuquerque...  Train on left with E1s is almost certainly train 21 the all-coach El Capitan, due out at 4:50PM.  Train on the right behind 3784 is train 123 the Grand Canyon northern section due out at 5 PM. The Super Chief just left town a few minutes before.  Times may be off since the schedule shifted a bit over the years, but not the meeting place.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, September 7, 2020 9:46 PM

More cool pictures!  Let's see now...

Photo 1)  Colorful!  You suppose the 'Dude's in the lead unit?

Photo 2)  I like the script myself, and why not use it?  If it's painted on using a stencil (and probably was) it's just as easy to do a block lettering.  I miss the beaver though.

Photo 3)  Fifty years old and it looks ready for fifty more!  But it won't get the chance, damn it all.  

Photo 4)  The exhaust stacks are interesting, to say the least.  Looks like you could play Bach's "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor" on 'em with some careful throttle manipulation.

Photo 5)  Looks like it was a nice place until the end came.  Sic transit gloria mundi.  

Photo 6)  Wow.  Oh, wow.  The way things ought to be all right.  AND, put some snow on the ground and you've got a perfect Christmas card!

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, September 7, 2020 8:36 PM

Interesting pic. Not just for the Draper Taper SD40-2 but the open auto racks ... 1989, bit late in the game no? Also noted not supposed to be first behind the power as exhaust not good on new vehicle finish. 

9010_9009 leads 1st section of "Early Pig" 926 with Ford Oakville traffic on headend. 
Not approved marshalling to have open multi-level auto carriers near power due to diesel exhaust. 
Unknown if train included piggybacks as well or if it was just a dispatching move to give better priority to this traffic. 
SD40-2 full-width "Draper taper" carbody. DD-GM A4816 10/30/1988

2)  Block lettering or Script?  Some favour one over the other but I always liked the script.

6623 running "van only" at the moment. Note the backup airhose with its shrill peanut whistle

Note too the dwarf switch with electric lock controlled by dispatcher and the indicator box 
timed for three minute wait before switchman is to operate it with dispatcher's permission. 
Such switches are used on mainlines to protect approaching trains. 

Hochelaga Yard, Montreal. August 23, 1968 

 

3)  50 years old and still in service 1909-1959

M4h 3546 is 50 years old! CPR 5/1909 
Digital restoration: Walter Pfefferle

 

CN  1371 was GMDs 1000th Diesel built May 1960

1371 (GMD's 1000th diesel!) GMD A1856 5/1960 Sudbury 7/07/1983 

 

5) Posted this pic on the Huron Central thread on Trains when someone mentioned Franz.

I rode the Algoma Central up from Sault Ste. Marie to connect with the Canadian going West and got detrained at Franz.  Listed as a ghost town in Ontario all that's left is the Railroad junction.

Franz is pronounce Frahnzz like you're a débutante pronouncing France.  One of those end of the earth places. That was summer 1971.

Note the CPR work train with steam tender.

 

6) I'm certain most have seen this pic before, but it's worth revisiting. A moment in time that should still be the norm and with us.  Everything makes sense and is perfect. 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 6:12 AM

Again, the Scranton - Carbondale passenger train was pulled by another 2-8-0.

Didn't see any Challengers or Northerns.  Must have come through at night.

Were the L&NE Consolidations equipped with stokers?

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, August 31, 2020 2:14 AM

(3) is the Reuben Wells, custom made to work the 5.89% grade of the Madison Incline with adhesion.

(4) you had to work hard to fine one of the Central's few non-speedster Atlantics -- this class I believe built for the Big Four and equipped with measly 69" drivers (the mainline Atlantics had 79" and generally more style).  I believe that is a 'traction increaser' under the cab to lift the trailing truck and 'throw more weight on the drivers' when starting

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, August 30, 2020 7:23 PM

rcdrye
2) above is Central Pacific's "El gobernador"

As was said at the time, "All Hell couldn't keep it hot!"

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:51 PM

2) above is Central Pacific's "El gobernador" a 4-10-0 built by CP's Sacramento shops in 1884.  Master Mechanic AJ Stevens used a valve gear of his own design, in addition to adding an axle to the fairly succesful mastadon types.  The wonky valve gear, small firebox, short boiler tubes and long main rod stroke left it gasping for steam most of the time.  CP's smaller 2-6-0s and 4-8-0s were more flexible and reliable. The locomotive was not particularly successful and remained an orphan on the CP roster until scrapped around 1894.

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:09 PM

All Steam Edition 

All this fine talk of Decapods and Consolidations has me fired up.

So I'll start with a Primer

This is what a Railroad Locomotive should look like ... many variations but basically the same thing. A fine fine example. 

 

2). Now this looks like quite the old timer with the balloon stack and all but look at all those driving wheels.  I think it's a 4-10-something, too many fellas standing around the firebox to tell if there is a trailing truck.

 

3) Probably not the way most of us remember the Pennsy but it's remarkable nonetheless.  If anything the engineer has good visibility. 

 

4) New York Central RR, famous for its passenger Hudsons and even Pacifics and of course the all purpose Niagara but how about this often overlooked speedster, the 4-4-2.  How about that headlight sticking way out like that!

 

5) School students are back September 8th .. Gotta fire up the old engine for another year of getting it done.

Except I look more like Peter Ustinov in Logan's Run these days i.e. Much more rounder due to shelter in place. Santa Claus beard to boot. 

 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, August 30, 2020 10:32 AM

Flintlock76
By the way, didn't the L&NE have the biggest Decapods as well? 

Western Maryland I1s were over 10 tons heavier, and got better balancing and higher boiler pressure (240 vs. original 225) over the years, to where they would run 50mph like the improved PRR Decapods...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, August 30, 2020 10:21 AM

Dammit, I forgot the L&NE!  Silly me!

By the way, didn't the L&NE have the biggest Decapods as well?  

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, August 30, 2020 9:23 AM

Flintlock76
Oh yeah, the D&H's monster Consols, if I remember correctly they were the biggest 2-8-0's owned by anyone.

Ope-nay.  The monster Consols belonged to L&NE.  Now, it does have to be said that D&H had ONE that outweighed the L&NE's best by a measly 500lb ... but it was a special test, built in 1927, with a 300psi boiler that had appreciably more heating surface than the 0-8-8-0s (!) and while a grand product of engineering, remained the only one.  And L&NE's had auxiliary locomotives on the tenders!

 

I believe they didn't even have stokers...
Loree was notorious for not wanting stokers on anything (there was a comment in Trains many years ago about the "Red Edge stoker" (named for Loree's favored brand of shovel).  And yes, that included the compounds and 1114. 

It does have to be said that these were just about ideal for the way D&H ran coal trains right up to the mid-Thirties, just as L&NE's were ideally suited to that railroad's needs.  After Loree was gone, the railroad went to Challengers and good 4-8-4s and their world changed -- inconceivable to run either class without stokers!  But they also continued happily running 2-8-0s past the date of Mr. Klepper's photographs ... and as late as 1937, the first test of an all-welded boiler was undertaken on one of these engines.

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