Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 8:12 AM

Right, now which car was rebuilt as a body prototype for the R10s?   Keeping original trucks, motors, controls, brakes, etc.

And I believe ACF built some also.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 9:33 AM

That would be R7A 1575 (built under the contract of that name).  All the R7 and R7A cars were built as a collaboration between ACF and Pullman (Standard).

I don't believe this got the Thunderbird propulsion improvements, though, perhaps one of the greatest 'bangs for the buck' in transit-equipment history.  a 20-nominal-horsepower increase in motor power per car increased practical acceleration by over 1fpsps, which is substantial, over a 40% improvement from the R1-R9 series.

R10s were also notable for an 'improvement' we have talked about very recently: they were the first IND class to have air horns instead of air whistles...

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 9:57 AM

R7A 1575 did not receive new motors or controls. It's preserved at the New York Transit Museum.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 11:24 AM

And is often included in a train of R-types on Nostalgia Specials, so you can ride it on occasion.  Look forward to two of RC's question, one on each Quiz thread.

I'll post at least one R-1-9 photo soon.

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 12:56 PM

Didn't realize I was up on both...

A Canton, Ohio leathermaker got into the Interurban boom by getting involved with starting the Canton & Akron.  After some of it was completed, he and his partners sold out to the Everett-Moore Syndicate's Northern Ohio Traction & Light, after which he returned to his factory and cleaned up making a then-new product with which his name is still associated.  The factory was one of very few in Ohio served by steam road interchange cars, but on the NOT&L.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 6:20 PM

Wow, he really did clean up, didn't he?  But then again, no traction line can flourish in a vacuum, so to speak.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 10:36 PM

Kleenex?

Hoover?

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 10:37 PM

When I saw Canton, OH, I was pretty sure I had a good bearing on the situation... Looks like my mind was a bit dusty and in need of a good cleaning.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 11:02 PM

Rare that the right answer to a quiz question really sucks, isn't it?

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 6:10 AM

First one in with the first and last names wins the sweeps.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 8:07 AM

I'll give you the middle name, too, if you want: Henry.  (Would I get points for "Boss"?)

And his son's name was Herbert.  Yes, it was.

Come on, you guys, don't make me ask a question like 'what person famous for railroad design beloved of Wayne redesigned the company's product?' ... pay the bill and name the name.

The inventor, by the way, and original producer was James Murray Spangler.  How it got our hero into the business is an amusing story.

 

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 9:25 AM

You got it.  The info I have found so far is sketchy about how N.O.T.&L. handled the cars, but it did pass by about a block away on Main Street.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 10:09 AM

Interesting side: The first book on Mining and ore processing methods, also notable for the first factual account of minerals and mineralogy, the De Re Metallica as written by Georgius Agricola, was translated in English by Herbert Clark Hoover and Lou Henry Hoover.  Thick book! 

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 11:45 AM

Overmod
Come on, you guys, don't make me ask a question like 'what person famous for railroad design beloved of Wayne redesigned the company's product?' ... pay the bill and name the name.

Clearly the designer of the Century - Henry Dreyfuss.  You still have to ask a question.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 1:11 PM

rcdrye
You still have to ask a question.

Drat, and I tried so hard.  Perhaps more than a bit too hard.

Give me a little while to come up with something worthy of the contest and not more Trivial Pursuit for Locomotives (to quote a revived RyPN thread of recent note where I got into trouble, too ...)

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, January 30, 2020 11:10 AM

While we're waiting...

The N.O.T.&L. and its successors put a spur onto the grounds of the Hoover Co. in North Canton in 1922. Even though there was an interchange in Canton, it was only used for local supplies since the street curves in Canton were too tight for trains of steam railroad equiment.  Instead, Hoover's shipments went to Akron, where there was an interchange with the Akron & Barberton Belt.  A road widening project between Akron and Canton that would have displaced the line led to a decision to abandon that section.  Passenger service ended in 1928, but carload freight service continued into 1929.  Interurban-style freight to Canton was handled via an alternate route in part over an affiliated line.

The Hoover factory hasn't had rail access since 1929.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, February 13, 2020 7:13 AM

I reserve the balance of my time and move we open the floor to new business in the meantime.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, February 17, 2020 5:15 PM

For the first several years after its inauguration, the "Streamliner City of San Francisco" got its west coast service at this facility, about 10 miles by rail from the Oakland Mole.  Service at his facility was discontinued in July 1941.  Bonus points for explaining why.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 2:53 AM

The promised R1-9 photo, a Marc Glucksman photo, under the new trainshed at Stillwell Avenue Coney Island, at a fantdrip:

 

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