Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 8:12 AM

Right, now which car was rebuilt as a body prototype for the R10s?   Keeping original trucks, motors, controls, brakes, etc.

And I believe ACF built some also.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 9:33 AM

That would be R7A 1575 (built under the contract of that name).  All the R7 and R7A cars were built as a collaboration between ACF and Pullman (Standard).

I don't believe this got the Thunderbird propulsion improvements, though, perhaps one of the greatest 'bangs for the buck' in transit-equipment history.  a 20-nominal-horsepower increase in motor power per car increased practical acceleration by over 1fpsps, which is substantial, over a 40% improvement from the R1-R9 series.

R10s were also notable for an 'improvement' we have talked about very recently: they were the first IND class to have air horns instead of air whistles...

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 9:57 AM

R7A 1575 did not receive new motors or controls. It's preserved at the New York Transit Museum.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 11:24 AM

And is often included in a train of R-types on Nostalgia Specials, so you can ride it on occasion.  Look forward to two of RC's question, one on each Quiz thread.

I'll post at least one R-1-9 photo soon.

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 12:56 PM

Didn't realize I was up on both...

A Canton, Ohio leathermaker got into the Interurban boom by getting involved with starting the Canton & Akron.  After some of it was completed, he and his partners sold out to the Everett-Moore Syndicate's Northern Ohio Traction & Light, after which he returned to his factory and cleaned up making a then-new product with which his name is still associated.  The factory was one of very few in Ohio served by steam road interchange cars, but on the NOT&L.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 6:20 PM

Wow, he really did clean up, didn't he?  But then again, no traction line can flourish in a vacuum, so to speak.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 10:36 PM

Kleenex?

Hoover?

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 10:37 PM

When I saw Canton, OH, I was pretty sure I had a good bearing on the situation... Looks like my mind was a bit dusty and in need of a good cleaning.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 11:02 PM

Rare that the right answer to a quiz question really sucks, isn't it?

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 6:10 AM

First one in with the first and last names wins the sweeps.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 8:07 AM

I'll give you the middle name, too, if you want: Henry.  (Would I get points for "Boss"?)

And his son's name was Herbert.  Yes, it was.

Come on, you guys, don't make me ask a question like 'what person famous for railroad design beloved of Wayne redesigned the company's product?' ... pay the bill and name the name.

The inventor, by the way, and original producer was James Murray Spangler.  How it got our hero into the business is an amusing story.

 

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 9:25 AM

You got it.  The info I have found so far is sketchy about how N.O.T.&L. handled the cars, but it did pass by about a block away on Main Street.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 10:09 AM

Interesting side: The first book on Mining and ore processing methods, also notable for the first factual account of minerals and mineralogy, the De Re Metallica as written by Georgius Agricola, was translated in English by Herbert Clark Hoover and Lou Henry Hoover.  Thick book! 

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 11:45 AM

Overmod
Come on, you guys, don't make me ask a question like 'what person famous for railroad design beloved of Wayne redesigned the company's product?' ... pay the bill and name the name.

Clearly the designer of the Century - Henry Dreyfuss.  You still have to ask a question.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 1:11 PM

rcdrye
You still have to ask a question.

Drat, and I tried so hard.  Perhaps more than a bit too hard.

Give me a little while to come up with something worthy of the contest and not more Trivial Pursuit for Locomotives (to quote a revived RyPN thread of recent note where I got into trouble, too ...)

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, January 30, 2020 11:10 AM

While we're waiting...

The N.O.T.&L. and its successors put a spur onto the grounds of the Hoover Co. in North Canton in 1922. Even though there was an interchange in Canton, it was only used for local supplies since the street curves in Canton were too tight for trains of steam railroad equiment.  Instead, Hoover's shipments went to Akron, where there was an interchange with the Akron & Barberton Belt.  A road widening project between Akron and Canton that would have displaced the line led to a decision to abandon that section.  Passenger service ended in 1928, but carload freight service continued into 1929.  Interurban-style freight to Canton was handled via an alternate route in part over an affiliated line.

The Hoover factory hasn't had rail access since 1929.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, February 13, 2020 7:13 AM

I reserve the balance of my time and move we open the floor to new business in the meantime.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, February 17, 2020 5:15 PM

For the first several years after its inauguration, the "Streamliner City of San Francisco" got its west coast service at this facility, about 10 miles by rail from the Oakland Mole.  Service at his facility was discontinued in July 1941.  Bonus points for explaining why.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 2:53 AM

The promised R1-9 photo, a Marc Glucksman photo, under the new trainshed at Stillwell Avenue Coney Island, at a fantrip:

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, February 24, 2020 6:28 AM

rcdrye
For the first several years after its inauguration, the "Streamliner City of San Francisco" got its west coast service at this facility, about 10 miles by rail from the Oakland Mole. Service at his facility was discontinued in July 1941. Bonus points for explaining why.

The place the trains were serviced took care of other equiment that shared similar parts to the E2s.  The West Oakland roundhouse didn't know how to handle them.  At least a bit of street running was required to get to the service facility.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, February 29, 2020 2:35 PM

Possibly the train was serviced at the SP's Interurban Electric (Bay Area Suburban operation) maintenance facilities until that electrification and most rackage were abandoned with some taken over by the Key System and in use until that system's abandonment.

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, February 29, 2020 7:51 PM

daveklepper

Possibly the train was serviced at the SP's Interurban Electric (Bay Area Suburban operation) maintenance facilities until that electrification and most rackage were

 

The IER shops were in Alameda, reached via the 7th St IER line and a junction in Fruitvale.  SP sent the "City" units down there for servicing.  The end of IER service in 1941 resulted in the shop's closing.  By that time SP had a few diesel switchers in the Bay Area along with some service facilities.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Sunday, March 1, 2020 2:50 AM

After the IER shop was closed, the diesel streamliner “City of San Francisco”  was served at former SP/Central Pacific Car Paint Shop, later the Southern Pacific Diesel Shop which was the oldest extant industrial railroad building in Oakland. The southeastern half of the building dates to 1874, just five years after the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad.

In 1942, the Southern Pacific Paint Shop was modified to serve the diesel locomotives of the new “City of San Francisco” streamliner and renamed the Streamliner Shop. The original arched doors were modified at this time to accommodate the newer, larger equipment.  :  )

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, March 2, 2020 2:54 AM

Jones, would you like to ask the next question, or should I?

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, March 2, 2020 9:12 AM

Well I'll ask the next question!

It's concerning that R1-9 car in the photo that David posted on February 19th, the one at Coney Island.

Isn't that the kind of car King Kong pulled off the elevated and smashed up?  Sure looks like it!  And that car didn't break into splinters either, Kong had to work at it!

By the way, on today's date in 1933 "King Kong" premiered at Radio City Music Hall and the Roxy.  Happy birthday King Kong!  Long live the king! 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, March 2, 2020 12:51 PM

Flintlock76
Isn't that the kind of car King Kong pulled off the elevated and smashed up?  Sure looks like it! 

Wayne -- where would you expect to find an R1/9 on elevated trackage within a fairly large number of blocks of the Empire State Building???

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, March 2, 2020 5:29 PM

Overmod

 

 
Flintlock76
Isn't that the kind of car King Kong pulled off the elevated and smashed up?  Sure looks like it! 

 

Wayne -- where would you expect to find an R1/9 on elevated trackage within a fairly large number of blocks of the Empire State Building???

 

Well jeez, Kong sure found it, whatever it was!  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwgdgD_BDHE  

Mind you, I'm not, and have never claimed to be, an expert on New York City's mass transit, either subways, elevateds, or elevateds that are really subway cars coming up for some fresh air.  I leave that to others.  Wink

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, March 2, 2020 6:44 PM

Nice clip and nice work Wayne, well done! 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, March 2, 2020 7:14 PM

Thank you Vince!

You know, if we can't have some laughs here from time to time then what's the point?  

A personal note:  I was driving south on the New Jersey Turnpike on the day of "King Kong's" 50th anniversary, and had a great view of the Empire State Building with that unfortunately short-lived inflatable King Kong hanging on it.  What made it even better was they'd arranged for two Stearman biplanes to circle the building!  Perfection itself! 

Only in New York!

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, March 2, 2020 8:14 PM

Now that's a good memory. Good fortune to have seen that. Imagine that! 

Notice how well dressed the folks on the subway were. All of them! Now it's sweat pants and a t shirt or no shirt in the majority.

Still to this day if I go to the Doctor or go out shopping I make a point of dressing kind of snappy. Maybe not a tie, but a sports jacket, real trousers, usually black, never jeans, heavy blue overcoat, very comfy, for the winter.  In the classroom too. All the other instructors wear blue jeans and sweatshirts and of course all in unison their very trendy Canada Goose parka.  Must be $50,000 worth of those ridiculous things walking thru the door every morning.  It must be at least 20 feet from the car to the door and then back to their heated garage at home but damn they sure are 'with it'. None of them ever go out at all during the day, ever. They say the jeans and the rest of it makes the students feel comfortable but I say bah-loney.  They are not my equal until they get that diploma and they really respect that. Then when I personally throw my BBQ here on my deck for those that graduated, thats when I wear my jeans and let my hair down. Hipster doofus BBQ apron too! 

Now how did I get on this... oh yeah, folks riding the subway! Quite good animation and special effects considering the year. 

 

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