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Version 5 of The CB&Q in Wyoming

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  • Member since
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Posted by "JaBear" on Saturday, June 27, 2020 4:02 PM

Pruitt
It's not much, I know, but it is a start!

Hoorah!!!

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by selector on Saturday, June 27, 2020 1:30 PM

And what a great start it is with so much of your nice work making the journey to a 'nuther life.  It gets a lot more fun now.... Cool

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Posted by Pruitt on Saturday, June 27, 2020 10:58 AM

Erie, Crandell, There are cleanouts near the floor on all the soil pipes. So at least getting a line snaked won't mean cutting off this cap and then sealing it back up.

Dave, I agree with you completely. But as we've been learning, everything in the house was done as cheaply as possible. Workmanship is generally adequate, but clearly the buildert cut every corner he could.

27 June 2020

Work on the layout has finally started!   BeerBeerCake

The evening of June 25th I rounded up all the L-girders and legs for the Casper sections of the layout:

And yesterday I started modifying the legs fof the new layout. Casper sits a bit higher in this design than it was on the old layout, so I had to add extensions to the legs. Because the floor is not just bare concrete, I also need to use something a bit easier on it than just T-nuts and hex bolts. For the Casper sections, since I'll have to move them around a bit for a while, I decided to add casters to the bottom. Other sections will have furniture feet. Here's the first leg for the Casper sections modified and ready to go:

It's not much, I know, but it is a start!

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Posted by hon30critter on Friday, June 26, 2020 1:00 AM

Erie Lackawanna in Georgia
Indeed that pvc pipe is for a future drain - it's added before the slab is poured.  Usual term would be it's "stubbed" for a drain such as a toilet or shower.  The water supply would run thru the wall studs but the drainage must be at a low point.

Thanks Erie Lackawanna,

The house builders certainly could have done a better job than just leaving a pipe sticking up out of the floor. They could have installed a proper drain connector level with the floor with a screwed on plate to seal it, like this:

Oh well, I'll stop stirring the bucket.Smile, Wink & GrinLaugh

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by selector on Thursday, June 25, 2020 2:06 PM

hon30critter

 

 

 
Pruitt
I wasn't sure how decent a job I could do getting the flooring around the tubular obstructions near the furnace, but I think they came out okay:

 

I'd say they look pretty good!

I'm curious. What is the purpose of the short white pipe with the cap on that sits in the 'middle' of the floor? The position seems to be a PITA.

Dave

 

We call them 'cleanouts' up here.  I have several around the permiter of the house, but outside, to service the perimeter drainage.  I see them inside houses these years for future considerations if they are connected to the dark water sewer (probably part of a future upgrade or revenue suite), or to inspect the main drainage and if necessary to run a clearance device down them to get rid of obstructions.

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Posted by Erie Lackawanna in Georgia on Thursday, June 25, 2020 1:03 PM

Indeed that pvc pipe is for a future drain - it's added before the slab is poured.  Usual term would be it's "stubbed" for a drain such as a toilet or shower.  The water supply would run thru the wall studs but the drainage must be at a low point.

Another use could to provide access to the main drain for clearing future with a snake

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, June 25, 2020 10:59 AM

Thanks, Dave

I've been wondering that same thing ever since we moved in. My best guess is that it's a toilet drain if ever a basement bathroom is added. It won't be while I'm here.

Crandell, I didn't mean to ignore you earlier. Yes, my wife's friend was a big help with all the joist painting. 

25 June 2020

The flooring planks are all laid and the floor is completed. Just in time, too - my hips and thighs (to say nothing of my still-healing blistered right knee) are sore from all the kneeling, sliding along, rising, and repeating a jillion times...

Here's a photo:

 This was the last corner finished:

Another of my wife's friends came over for lunch yesterday, with her husband and daughter. In short order he was helping me with a row of narrow planks adjacent to the wall by the furnace (not in these pohotos). The top surface of those planks is hard! To cut them you score the top surface with a utility knife, then snap the pieces apart much like styrene. Scoring lenghtwise sure dulls the blades fast.

Now it's just trim, baseboard, a couple more lights, and trains! Not necessarily in that order. (guess which will start in the next day or two! Cowboy)

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, June 25, 2020 12:44 AM

Pruitt
I wasn't sure how decent a job I could do getting the flooring around the tubular obstructions near the furnace, but I think they came out okay:

I'd say they look pretty good!

I'm curious. What is the purpose of the short white pipe with the cap on that sits in the 'middle' of the floor? The position seems to be a PITA.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
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Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, June 23, 2020 7:48 PM

23 June 2020

Flooring work continues apace.

I wasn't sure how decent a job I could do getting the flooring around the tubular obstructions near the furnace, but I think they came out okay:

Here's the current progress:

Either tomorrow or Thursday we'll be finished with the flooring. Then it's just trim and baseboards (and a few more lights).

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Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, June 21, 2020 12:37 AM

Thanks Dave... I think. {cluck cluck cluck}.

After a couple days off while my wife adding a few rows of flooring, my blistered knee healed enough that I can bend it without making the blister seep (that sounds gross, doesn't it?) and without pain in it. I found I could get down on my left knee to install flooring planks. It's harder than doing it on both knees (which is hard enough!), so I can do two to three rows per session, and maybe two sessions a day, with my wife doing a row or two a day as well. We're now around 40% done with the flooring.

Unfortunately, my wife's friend went back home to Spokane Monday morning. But before she left they finished the ceiling painting! (then I told her where her car keys were hidden Whistling)

Bear, the spare room is all made up and ready for you! Shall I expect you on Monday? Don't worry - I'm not a hard taskmaster. You'll get Sundays off, as long as you stay on schedule!

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Posted by "JaBear" on Saturday, June 20, 2020 10:17 PM

LB by Bear, on Flickr

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, June 18, 2020 11:40 PM

The flooring looks great Mark. I'm so glad to see that your wife is contributing so much, and having her friend pitch in too is fantastic!

You aren't exactly a spring chicken so I'm not surprised that your knees are sore and blistered. I'm glad that you have decided to give yourself some time off. The amount of work that you have put into the layout in just a few months is amazing. I think I have blisters on my brain from thinking about it!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaugh

Just remember to keep things fun. If you take a break you don't have to apologise to anyone!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by selector on Thursday, June 18, 2020 12:37 PM

Thank goodness for friends, especially those willing to lend a hand.  I keep seeing progress, and doggedness, so that's good between the two of you, Mark. Laugh

You'll be back to cutting milled lumber in no time at all.

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, June 18, 2020 11:08 AM

Thanks, Douglas!

18 June 2020

We've progressed to finished flooring! We picked up 50(!) boxes of vinyl plank flooring. Here the first two pieces have been "installed" on the subfloor:

We have a long way to go!

And here we've finished the first row, and are about to start on the second. This was June 12th.

Two days later and we've got about three feet installed along the wall, and the alcove is complete as well:

This was about five hours' work total. Then I discovered that my right knee had a huge blister on it from all the kneeling and moving around. Knee pads weren't quite cutting it. So I'm off flooring duty for a week or two.

But my wife and her friend Lina, visiting from Spokane, jumped right in! My wife was chomping at the bit to try her hand at this, so off they went (sorry for the slightly blurry picture):

These planks lock together on all four sides, so they're not easy to lay. It took a dozen or so planks for me to get the hang of it, and my wife is learning the same thing. Still, we're getting there!

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Posted by Doughless on Thursday, June 11, 2020 8:16 PM

I like the finished look of the trim and painted flanges.  I'm not a big fan of the way drop ceilings look, so leaving the joists bare was a time and money saver, IMO.

If your wife happened to have a few sisters or more friends, you might be able to paint the entire ceiling black and those joists would disappear, also being on the backside of the bright lights would help.

Or like your mudder guy, maybe think about hiring a painter to spray the ceiling black before the floor goes in.

- Douglas

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, June 11, 2020 7:52 PM

Thanks, Rich and Dave

11 June 2020

I got the first bits of ceiling trim up in the alcove:

It looks a lot better than the ragged edge of the sheetrock.

My wife's friend Lina is visiting from Spokane. Not being one to pass up an opportunity, I put her to right to work painting the ceiling joist flanges:

We're going to pick up the vinyl plank flooring in the next day or two and start laying it in the alcove, where essentially all the painting is finished. Layout time is getting closer!

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Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, June 9, 2020 11:16 PM

richhotrain
Awesome photos, Mark. Damm, that looks good.

I agree!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, June 9, 2020 3:24 PM

Awesome photos, Mark. Damm, that looks good.  Bow

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, June 9, 2020 2:42 PM

9 June 2020

The second and final wall coat was finished a few days ago. It didn't come out too bad:

I've started on the trim painting. There's enough done for me to see that it really subdues the lower flanges on the ceiling joists. They, and the wall supports, really receed into the background once painted.

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, June 4, 2020 9:21 AM

Douglas - Thanks! I always feel like I'm progressing at a snail's pace, but I have to admit this past month saw a lot of progress.

Dave - Two coats certainly will do it! If (as I expect) there are still some areas that could use a third coat, the official story will be that those areas are weathered and sun-bleached. Stick out tongue
Remember, these are the Q's exterior colors.

I meant to get the primer tinted when I bought it, but I just plain forgot. I've done that before (tinted the primer, that is) and it works great! But at this point it is what it is.

Rich - You're right in that wall prep is extremely important. My prep failure was in priming the wall white while planning to put on a dark color. Funny thing, though - the liquid primer had a distinctly grey cast to it. It turned white after drying.

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Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, June 4, 2020 5:10 AM

hon30critter
 
richhotrain
Something had to be wrong with the wall surface preparation to require 4 coats of paint. If properly primed and with quality paint, two coats should be sufficient.  

Rich, I'm a little bit perturbed that you would dismiss our painter's professionalism so quickly. His work ethic is incredible. He uses Benjamin Moore paints. He takes all of the wall plates and ceiling fixture plates down and then reinstalls them. He removes and rehangs all of the pictures and wall decorations. He fixes drywall problems at no extra cost. We have never found a single drop of stray paint. We have used his services many times and we will use him many more times again.

FYI, he primed the bedroom twice. The previous colour was a hideous dark brown. Obviously we didn't have a clue about decorating when we did thatSmile, Wink & Grin, and there were problems with old wallpaper glue bleeding through the brown. It was his decision to do the four coats, and he did not charge for the additional paint required. The resulting colour is very rich.

Cheers!!

Dave  

Dave, I didn't challenge the professionalism of your painter nor did I question the quality of the paint. I said that the wall surface preparation must have been faulty, and you confirmed that by acknowledging that old wallpaper glue had bled through.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, June 4, 2020 1:28 AM

richhotrain
Something had to be wrong with the wall surface preparation to require 4 coats of paint. If properly primed and with quality paint, two coats should be sufficient. 

Rich, I'm a little bit perturbed that you would dismiss our painter's professionalism so quickly. His work ethic is incredible. He uses Benjamin Moore paints. He takes all of the wall plates and ceiling fixture plates down and then reinstalls them. He removes and rehangs all of the pictures and wall decorations. He fixes drywall problems at no extra cost. We have never found a single drop of stray paint. We have used his services many times and we will use him many more times again.

FYI, he primed the bedroom twice. The previous colour was a hideous dark brown. Obviously we didn't have a clue about decorating when we did thatSmile, Wink & Grin, and there were problems with old wallpaper glue bleeding through the brown. It was his decision to do the four coats, and he did not charge for the additional paint required. The resulting colour is very rich.

Cheers!!

Dave

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
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Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, June 4, 2020 12:20 AM

hon30critter

I love the wall colour, but you may find that unfortunately two coats won't do it. We had our master bedroom painted a similar colour a few years ago and it took four coats to get the proper depth of colour. That was with a professional painter doing the work.  

Something had to be wrong with the wall surface preparation to require 4 coats of paint. If properly primed and with quality paint, two coats should be sufficient. 

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, June 3, 2020 10:35 PM

Hi Mark,

That's a huge amount of progress in just one month!

I love the wall colour, but you may find that unfortunately two coats won't do it. We had our master bedroom painted a similar colour a few years ago and it took four coats to get the proper depth of colour. That was with a professional painter doing the work. Hopefully you won't suffer the same fate.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, June 3, 2020 7:26 PM

Mark, you do really good work, both with construction and making videos.  I can't wait to see the layout get started.

And the amount of work you've done since settling in Wyoming is impressive.  

- Douglas

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Posted by Pruitt on Wednesday, June 3, 2020 8:32 AM

3 June 2020

I just uploaded my latest update video:

Over the last few days we've primed the train room:

And applied the first finish coat of paint:

  • Member since
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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, June 1, 2020 9:49 AM

Dave - Thanks! I hope so.

Mike - Thanks! The along-the-walls backdrops will be separate, mounted on 1X2 stringers along the top and bottom of the backdrop. The top will be capped with a thin white finish molding piece (I think). If I do it right, it should look kinda nice. 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, June 1, 2020 6:46 AM

Looks great Mark!  I taped and finished our place up North, and when I started painting, I noticed a few areas that I needed to touch up. Surprise

Will the backdrops be a seperate thing, attached to the layout and walls?  It will be a nice contrast to the room colors.

Mike.

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Posted by hon30critter on Sunday, May 31, 2020 9:33 PM

Pruitt
The walls will be Indian Red and trimwork will be Bronze Green. These were the standard colors used on Burlington structures during my modeling era, 1930-1945.

That will look great!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
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  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
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Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, May 31, 2020 10:52 AM

Thanks, Crandell!

I hope I can start the layout before the end of July. Painting the walls should be finished within a week, and ceiling beams by the end of the week after. I need to paint and install trim boards around the top of the walls, but I'll do that piecemeal, starting above where the Casper part of the layout goes.

The biggest single part left is the finished flooring and baseboards.

Here are the colors I'll be painting the train room:

The walls will be Indian Red and trimwork will be Bronze Green. These were the standard colors used on Burlington structures during my modeling era, 1930-1945.

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