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Version 5 of The CB&Q in Wyoming

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  • Member since
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  • From: Dearborn Station
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Posted by richhotrain on Saturday, April 4, 2020 10:40 AM

Pruitt

Rich,

She joined in because she finally resigned herself to me playing with trains.

And, she looks like she knows how to use those tools - - - which I am sure she does. 
 
Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by Pruitt on Saturday, April 4, 2020 10:38 AM

Thanks for the very nice comments, everyone!

Bear,

You're rapidly becoming one of my favorite people! Your suggestion will save a LOT of work! Big Smile

Rich,

She joined in because she finally resigned herself to me playing with trains.

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Posted by richhotrain on Saturday, April 4, 2020 4:16 AM

You are to be envied, Mark. That is a rare wife who joins in on the construction phase. Bow

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by "JaBear" on Saturday, April 4, 2020 3:51 AM
Thanks for the update, Mark, and well done to the team.
 
Having had the chance of another look at your ceiling, I’ll double down on my suggestion on doing nothing, even leaving the I beam exposed; after all I would argue that a railroad could be considered “Industrial Art”, and the I beam, ducting and plumbing are part of the frame!
 
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by hon30critter on Saturday, April 4, 2020 1:35 AM

Hi Mark,

Another excellent video! Very informative and well edited.

Thanks,

Dave

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Posted by selector on Friday, April 3, 2020 11:54 AM

Very nice and illustrative, Mark.  My compiments to both of you for your teamwork and skills.

Sssoooo....will that mask do when you go to the store? Laugh

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Posted by Pruitt on Friday, April 3, 2020 9:25 AM

3 April 2020

I've just posted my latest video update on YouTube.

No layout work yet, but work on the train room is progressing faster now!

 

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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, March 30, 2020 10:39 AM

30 March 2020

Work continues. The last several days I spent laying additional OSB in several locations, and adding another studwall:

At this point I'm about 40% done with the walls, and 80% with the subfloor. By late April, at this rate, I should be able to start the electrical work.

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:11 PM

Thanks for all the input, guys!

I especially like the recommendations to not do anything with it! Fits right in with my basic philosophy - when possible, do as little as you can. Big Smile

Mike - Yes, I'm going to use the same lights. And I mean the same lights. I took them down at the old house and brought them with me.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 26, 2020 9:57 PM

Pruitt
I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

I think I'd box out the beam with framing and drywall, and do the ceiling as close to the joist as you can, giving you all the head room you can get.

Are you still going to use the LED ceiling lights you had for the last version?  

Mike.

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Posted by Doughless on Thursday, March 26, 2020 7:13 PM

Pruitt

AND...

Even though it will be a couple months (at least) before I start the ceilings, I've started thinking about what to DO for a ceiling?

I was planning on installing a nice flat drop ceiling throughout the basement, but in clearing the steel beams will leave the ceiling about 3" over my head. That will feel a bit closed-in, I'm thinking.

I don't like the idea of a variable-height ceiling, but the best approach may be to box out around those beams and make the rest of the ceiling several inches higher (but low enough to clear the heating ducts and such) to provide decent head height throughout the rest of the basement. I can box the beams out easily enough with 2X4's and drywall, then maybe the drop ceilings everywhere else.

I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

 

New construction means the ceiling will be relatively clean with no years of dust accumulation falling on to the layout.  Not that I ever experienced much of that.  All of my layouts have been built in rooms with unfinished ceilings.

 I would do nothing.

Except possibly painting it all black as to make any cluttered look disappear (an artist's trick).  Never used it, but there is a product called dryfall.  Its a sprayed paint that dries on the way down so the excess can be swept up from the floor.

- Douglas

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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, March 26, 2020 2:22 AM

Pruitt
I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

Hi Mark,

I definitely agree that you don't want a ceiling that is only 3" above your head. Claustrophobia immediately comes to mind. I can't tolerate being in places where I am squeezed in, either vertically or horizontally. You want to enjoy the space, not regret it.

I think your suggestion of boxing in the beams with drywall is the best way to go, but I'm not sure that you need to use 2x4s. Decent quality 2x2s will be plenty solid enough once the drywall is screwed into place. I say that despite the fact that I am going to build my layout strong enough to hold a Sherman tank. If you want to use 2x4s then go for it! I'd probably do the same.Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughLaugh

Cheers!!

Dave

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Posted by "JaBear" on Thursday, March 26, 2020 1:22 AM
Gidday, Mark, having had a closer look at your current “ceiling”, and being of a lazy disposition, I would do nothing.
 
My reasoning being that if I were ever to be able to visit your “completed layout”, my focus should be on the layout and not aimlessly gawking at your ceiling, exclaiming “Oooh, look at that shiny ducting!!" And if I were silly enough to so, then I would expect you to politely, yet expeditiously, show me out the front door!!
 
That said, now that I have the time, and to her-in-doors delight, I am installing white rigid polystyrene insulation, in my basement, which fits between the “floor” beams. I do not wish to cover the plumbing, so as to keep easy access if any repairs, hopefully not, ever need to be made.
 
However, if you were to clad your ceiling, then I would keep the steel I beams exposed, I’m not claustrophobic, as such, but then I could never be a submariner, either!
 
My 2 Cents Cheers, the Bear.

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by Pruitt on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 11:09 PM

AND...

Even though it will be a couple months (at least) before I start the ceilings, I've started thinking about what to DO for a ceiling?

I was planning on installing a nice flat drop ceiling throughout the basement, but in clearing the steel beams will leave the ceiling about 3" over my head. That will feel a bit closed-in, I'm thinking.

I don't like the idea of a variable-height ceiling, but the best approach may be to box out around those beams and make the rest of the ceiling several inches higher (but low enough to clear the heating ducts and such) to provide decent head height throughout the rest of the basement. I can box the beams out easily enough with 2X4's and drywall, then maybe the drop ceilings everywhere else.

I'm looking for some different viewpoints on types of ceilings, heights, etc., so don't be shy! Please share your thoughts.

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Posted by hon30critter on Sunday, March 22, 2020 5:38 PM

Nice to see the progress Mark!

Dave

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Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, March 22, 2020 5:23 PM

22 March 2020

Work continues on the basement.

The last section of the 40' long stud wall went up yesterday:

And today my wife and I framed out one of the windows:

Sorry for the dark image, but the daylight in the window really overpowered the light in the basement.

I would have framed the second window, but I ran out of 2X4's. I'll do it as I proceed with other walls in the room. First though, I have get back to laying subfloor (oh joy!).

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 19, 2020 1:31 PM

Pruitt
But I may paint the walls in Burlington station colors... 

Laugh  There ya go!  If you don't have a back drop figured out, good ole' sky blue also works.

Mike.

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 19, 2020 12:08 PM

No more insulation. Just the rigid foam behind the studs.

I was thinking about doing a board-and-batten finish on the walls, to make it look like the outside of a train station, but wifey vetoed that. Sad It will be drywall. 

But I may paint the walls in Burlington station colors... Geeked

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, March 19, 2020 10:02 AM

Looking good Mark!  Are you putting more insulation between the studs? Just curious.

I may have missd this, but are you going to use drywall for the finish?

Mike.

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 19, 2020 9:44 AM

Other than a lingering cough (gets me looks from folks right now!), I've recovered completely from my winter cold, so work has accelerated some on the basement.

Two more sections of studwall have been installed. Here my wife is helping install one wall section:

And yet more insulation braced against the wall while the adhesive cures:

And the second new section installed - one to go:

The windows will be framed out once the studwall is complete, which hopefully will be in the next few days.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, March 15, 2020 8:26 AM

Looking good Mark!  It looks like the structual parts of your bench work are doing a good job of holding up the insulation. Yes

Mike.

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Posted by hon30critter on Friday, March 13, 2020 12:31 PM

Pruitt
I've added several more sheets of OSB to the floor, and am now at the point where I only have room for one or two more full sheets before I have to start cutting them down for the final edges:

If it was me doing the fitted pieces it would probably take longer than the rest of the floor, and more material than the main area used as well! Stick lumber I can deal with. Sheets not as well. My brother and I once used three full sheets of drywall to fit the last piece into a ceiling. It should have taken less than a half sheet!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughDunce

Great to see your progress!

Dave

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 12, 2020 5:20 PM

I know refinishing the basement isn't the most scintillating of topics of a model railroading forum, but progress is continuing.

I've added several more sheets of OSB to the floor, and am now at the point where I only have room for one or two more full sheets before I have to start cutting them down for the final edges:

I've also, just today, added more rigid foam insulation in preparation for adding ahother ten feet to the long stud wall:

Part of that preparation including moving the pile of boxes again. Most of thet stuff I put on the other side of the stairs, out of the train room. Most of what you see in the pile in the picture above will ultimately find a place under the layout (except the shelves).

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, March 6, 2020 6:44 AM

It is a happy and good thing to have a wife who isn't afraid of doing some work like that.  I really appreciate it that my wife works so hard and did alot of major work when we were finishing the basement, especially the bathroom tile and basement floor work.  And the best thing is, I don't have to take a picture because it's not a rare thing, it's her MO.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by selector on Thursday, March 5, 2020 5:34 PM

Nothing like some progress to get the heartbeat quickening, Mark.  And it's very precious that your squeeze came down to help you out.  Time like that will be beyond price in later years.  That image should be in a scrapbook somewhere, never to be forgotten.  Please pass on my compliments.

If you can believe it, I have video of my own wife pushing a wheelbarrow full of cordwood three summers ago, but the kicker was that she had a rope around her waist and was hauling a garden wagon also laden with about 70 pounds of wood.  I suddenly felt rather small when I saw that Herculean effort.  And it wasnt just one trip to the pile, either.  I think she managed three of four of those.  Across 70 feet of lawn.

Back to your prep, I'm really happy to see that you are persevering.  I know it sometimes seem a bit overwhelming, but keep plodding...it's good for weight control if nothing else. Laugh

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Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, March 5, 2020 1:45 PM

Progress is continuing. I just put down another sheet of OSB.

I'm going to bed now. Maybe I'll get up next week.

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 7:20 AM

Pruitt

27 February 2020

I've had a nasty cold for several weeks, and early in the month I fell while cleaning snow off the driveway, so work on the basement has been even slower than normal (snails have been outrunning me lately!).

But the last few days I've been felling a bit better, so work has resumed.

Additional insulation has gone up (that's ridiculously easy to do), and today, with my wife's help, we got the first stud wall built and installed in the train room. She's pretty good at pounding in those 3 1/2" 16 penny nails!

Not nearly as fast as Randy's basement work, huh?

Major kudo's!

As far as fast vs. not, it depends on how much money you have to throw at it.  My wife and I aren't quite that well-to-do.  We could have afforded it but I didn't want to dip into savings and retirement isn't terribly far off.

But every bit of work is being done by my wife and I. Contractors just cost too much. Maybe by late summer or early autumn I'll be able to report on some model railroading again (don't hold your breath). 

It helps a lot to have a "handy" wife.  When I met my wife, who is born and raised in northern England, she told me she laid a brick fire place.  I was like, you'll do!

I can relate on the contractor cost thing.  A contractor quoted us $3k to install all the drywall.  We said thanks and did it all ourselves, walls ceiling, floor.  We only paid to have the wiring/outlets and plumbing done (full basement bathroom).  Sure is nice to have that bathroom when working on the layout for hours!

My wife and I are managing but with her kid still not working and having to buy him a car and do other project on the house, we wanted to minimize costs.  We spent as we went, used coupons and in the end figure we finished the basement and a full bathroom for under $5k.  It took about 11 months from pulling the permit to inspeced/passed, but we are probably about 15 grand richer for it.  DIY, if you can, can save you major money.

My wife and I probably split the work in half.  The studs were already in, but we both hung all the drywall.  I did most of the taping and mudding and installed the suspended ceiling grid.  I got a diamond grinder to level the concrete floor along the expansion cracks.  My wife washed the floor, sealed it and applied the adhesive before installing the vinyl floor faux wood planks.

Now that's looking more like it!  The layout will look so much better in a finished space.  And, a drop ceiling is surprisingly easy to install I discovered.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 5:39 AM

3 March 2020

Thanks for the comments, everyone!

Here's the latest construction update video:

Short this month because I was under the weather for most of February.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Friday, February 28, 2020 8:12 AM

Looking good Mark!  I like the way you insulated, then the stud walls. Yes  Progress is porgress, your not stepping backwards, even though I know it seems like it sometimes!

Yes  Moving on!

Mike.

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