Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Version 5 of The CB&Q in Wyoming

45450 views
453 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 10:21 AM

Pruitt

Rich, saying my physical appearance has a neutral impact is maybe the nicest thing anyone has said to me in years! 

LOL x LOL

Mark, I can assure you that I spent more time fashioning that remark than the entire remainder of my reply.

I was not about to start a bromance, but some comment seemed warranted.

Should I stop there?  Methinks so. Kisses

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:58 AM

Dave, Rich,

I appreciate all your comments. Really.

And I honestly agree that the intro was too long. But I had to lay the groundwork for not only the first episode, but also the entire series, right up front. I probably should have gone back and re-recorded the intro, tightening it up significantly. But I didn't.

I was (and am) not upset, Dave. You do not have to shut up, ever. Your commentary has been very kind in the past, and your criticism of my intro isn't unkind. It's well thought out, and very valid. Like you, I'm also one of those guys that gives the talking heads the old heave-ho after a very short period of time. So thanks for your honest feedback. It will help with future videos.

Rich, saying my physical appearance has a neutral impact is maybe the nicest thing anyone has said to me in years! LaughLaughLaugh (Dave, "handsome dude"? You're overdue for your appointment with your optometrist).

Seriously, I was concerned at the overall length of the video, because I easily lose interest in videos that long. But I wanted to cover the subject thoroughly. To offset the length, I  added in some (what I think are) snazzy graphic effects to keep up the interest. The particle building logo in the intro screen (which taxed the heck out of my computer - it took between five and ten minutes to render each second of that opening shot) and the lines following the route on the maps, for example.

And now this post is too long. I'm getting into bad habits!

Anyway, thanks again everyone (including you, Bear Clown) for your comments.

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 5:42 AM

Let me give Mark my take on his most recent video and his intent to create a series of videos.

The entire video runs for 24 minutes and 48 seconds. Mark appears throughout the first 3 minutes, 33 seconds. Is the video too long? Is Mark's appearance too long? Does the entire video hold the viewer's interest? In my opinion, the answers are all subjective.

I think that it all depends upon two issues. One, how interested will a viewer be in a nearly 25 minute tutorial on researching the prototype? Two, how interested will a viewer be in the building of Casper Yard? For me, the two issues are intertwined. Even if I don't care all that much about Casper Yard in Wyoming, I may care about the BRC's Clearing Yard in Chicago, for example. What would it take to replicate the yard and how much selective compression will be required to simulate the prototype railroad on my layout?

Is a 25 minute too long? Maybe, yes. Maybe, no. If it's boring, then 5 minutes is too long. If it is interesting and informative, it could be even longer.

Is Mark's 3 1/2 minutes too long? In this particular video, that appearance is all at the beginning of the video, and the appearance represents just over 14 percent of the entire video. Now, I have watched "tutorial" videos, both longer and shorter than Mark's video, where the narrator puts me to sleep. I have watched other tutorial videos where the narrator blabs on and on and on until I forget why I am even watching the video. 

In the case of Mark's video, his physical appearance has neutral impact and his voice has a professional, knowledgeable tone. So, those first 3 1/2 minutes are entirely acceptable in setting up what is to follow. But, the viewer has to be interested enough in the content to sit through a nearly 25 minute video. If the viewer is interested enough in the content of the video, he won't be disappointed in this video in my opinion.

Rich 

 

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 13,313 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 12:03 AM

Hi Mark,

I said I would shut up about your video introduction, but I feel compelled to respectfully make one more comment. This is entirely based on my own initial reaction to the video. I claim no expertise in the field of keeping peoples' attention:

You are about to embark on creating a series of YouTube videos. If you want them to have any impact you will want to make the first video as sharp and entertaining as possible. That will entice people to want to watch the future videos. Most people will not be inclined to watch a 'talking head' for more than a few seconds. If you are lucky they will skip ahead like I did to get to the good parts. Otherwise they will move on to other videos. In other words, if you don't significantly catch their attention right at the beginning, they might not be inclined to follow your YouTube channel.

How to do that is another question. I think that your skills with creating summary screens could be put to use at the beginning so that the screen changes regularly instead of just showing your face (not that there is anything wrong with your face - you are a handsome dude Thumbs Up), perhaps interspersed with scenes of the layout and the plan.

These are just my thoughts. They are not intended to disparage your work. I would hate to see you go to all that work without gaining an audience.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Monday, March 1, 2021 11:30 PM

Dave, it is all my fault. Laugh

In a different thread, I challenged Mark's use of the term "it's a waste of money" and Mark wasn't exactly pleased. So, when you commented on the intro to his video with less than effusive praise, I kiddingly suggested to Mark that he shouldn't stand for it.  Cool

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 13,313 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Monday, March 1, 2021 8:41 PM

Pruitt
I don't think it's near as bad as some. Is it?

Mark,

Sorry if I upset you. Your video is not "bad" in any way. I probably should have kept my mouth shut, but I will try to explain why I said what I said.

I think your introduction was very thorough. The only reason I made my comment about it being a bit long was because there are several minutes of just you talking at the start. I will confess that the first time around I skipped a fair bit of the start of the video. I had to make a conscious decision to go back and watch the whole thing. Once your graphics and layout scenes start everything is fine, great in fact.

I hope I haven't upset you. You are to be admired for your dedication to producing such excellent videos. I look forward to them.

I'll shut up now.Embarrassed

Respectfully,

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    August 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 4,883 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Monday, March 1, 2021 1:35 PM
Gidday Mark thanks for part one of Building Casper.
 
I agree with Dave and Rich, regarding the usefulness to a newcomer to layout design. As while I don’t consider myself a newcomer to the hobby, your introduction has given clarity to the various thoughts (??) that have been rattling around in the void between my ears, regarding building my own layout.
 
My previous layout building has been in a club situation where design has been done on a committee basis, so now I have to make my own decisions regarding what’s in, what’s out, how much scale compression, how to suggest important things that’s off the layout etc.
 
Actually, I think I like the challenge as I found that I ended up making far too many compromises with the committee approach to layout design.
 
At least I have a definitive stating point, the car ferry, and therefore the ferry yard will be the focal point of the layout, and I also have the dimensions of the layout area.
 
As to the length of your introduction, (shrugs shoulder)Hmm. I find your delivery and manner “easy” and as a reluctant public speaker, I shudder to think of the pigs ear I’d make trying to do a similar video!!! SurpriseSurprise
 
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Monday, March 1, 2021 10:52 AM

Pruitt
 
richhotrain 
hon30critter

Hi Mark,

I do have to say that I think the introduction is a bit long and somewhat repetive

 Rich 

Yep. In fact, I kind of agree. The heck of it is, that's the edited-down version. I tried to cut it down more but it got too choppy, so I had to leave it as it is. 

I could have re-done the whole intro I suppose, but...

I don't think it's near as bad as some. Is it?  

It is not. I was just having some fun of course at Dave's expense but, seriously, I thought that the intro was a very good setup for what's to come. This has to be beneficial, especially for readers planning their first layout. Yes

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Monday, March 1, 2021 9:38 AM

richhotrain
 
hon30critter

Hi Mark,

I do have to say that I think the introduction is a bit long and somewhat repetive

 Rich

Yep. In fact, I kind of agree. The heck of it is, that's the edited-down version. I tried to cut it down more but it got too choppy, so I had to leave it as it is.

I could have re-done the whole intro I suppose, but...

I don't think it's near as bad as some. Is it? Tongue Tied

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Monday, March 1, 2021 5:08 AM

hon30critter

Hi Mark,

I do have to say that I think the introduction is a bit long and somewhat repetive

Mark, you aren't going to stand for this, are you?   Smile, Wink & Grin

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 13,313 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Monday, March 1, 2021 3:06 AM

Hi Mark,

Your first episode about building the Casper yard is really well done, as is typical of your work. You offer a step by step guide on how to go through the design process which is excellent. I hope that your video(s) get a lot of publicity because a lot of newcomers would benefit enormously from your experience.

I do have to say that I think the introduction is a bit long and somewhat repetive, but once past that the video gives the viewer a lot to think about.

Keep up the good work!

Cheers!!

Dave

 

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, February 28, 2021 11:37 AM

28 February 2021

I just published Episode 1 of Building Casper to my YouTube channel

  • Member since
    August 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 4,883 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Thursday, February 25, 2021 12:43 AM

Pruitt
Hey look, everybody! There goes Bear again!

LaughLaughLaughLaughLaugh

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:01 PM

Bear, all I can say is party on! LOL!

Dave, thanks for the compliment. And I'm glad to be of service to the community. Whistling

Rich, thank you. When I look at a project like this, mostly what I see is all the little things I screwed up. But feel free to send your fleet of tank cars! I'll get them all weathered up and placed on the layout. Uh... you didn't really want them back, did you?

24 February 2021

The dirt road is looking better. I added some coarser dirt between the ruts and along the edges, then scrubbed in the ruts with a Brite Boy to "polish" them a bit.

An odd thing happened - where the diluted Elmer's glue that affixed the dust and dirt seeped off the sides of the road the fake dirt darkened, and it looks like it won't lighten back up. It's not very noticeable from this angle, but from a higher perspective it's pretty obvious. I'm not sure what to do with that, but maybe ground cover, sparse though it will be, will hide it sufficiently. Or maybe I'll dust on a bit more fake dirt alongside the road to lighten it back up.

Hey look, everybody! There goes Bear again!

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, February 23, 2021 4:18 AM

Doggone it, Mark, those oil loading racks look great. And the weathering on those tank cars is spectacular. I will be sending my fleet of tank cars to you for weathering.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 13,313 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, February 23, 2021 1:55 AM

The oil loading rack is impressive Mark!

As for your stress, we are all very grateful that your are putting yourself through that now so that we can learn from your mistakes (and successes) and not have to go through the same thing!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaughThumbs UpClown

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    August 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 4,883 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Tuesday, February 23, 2021 12:34 AM

Pruitt
I also started adding a dirt road ... ...I'll add more detail to the road - larger dirt, gravel and rocks along the center of the road and between the tire ruts for both lanes.

 
Oooooh GOOD!! Please don’t make the road too rough, travelling around the layout in an enclosed box is bad enough, getting bounced around as well, would be far too much for a delicate soul such as myself!!!Smile, Wink & Grin
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Monday, February 22, 2021 9:30 PM

Oh thanks, Rich and John. The pressure is really on! I'm certainly not stressed out now! Wink

Seriously, I'm glad folks enjoy my progress pics. Those and the videos really keep me motivated to make progress.

Speaking of progress...

22 February 2021

Today I "finished" the chain of eight loading stations for the Standard Oil refinery. I'll be adding a ninth when benchwork towards Powder River is built. I still have to attach the access stairs and supply lines to the rack, which will go on the end of the ninth station. I also need to paint the whole thing. Silver and grey are the most common colors for metal racks now I think, but black was pretty common back in the 1930-1945 timeframe. In the photo I have of the Midwest Refinery in Casper the racks appear to be black, and the in the photos of the Standard Refinery they're either dark grey or black, so I'll probably go with black (which will be pretty easy, since the entire model is molded in black plastic).

After painting I'll add lights, and finally plant the whole thing permanently in it's home on the layout. Until then it will be set loosely in place there.

Here's then entire rack posing for posterity sitting in it's final assembly location next to the Casper Yard mainline:

And here it is in a 3/4 view (hey, at least the end closest to the camera is in focus!).

And a closer view of a couple loading stations with the rack sitting in it's eventually permanent home between the loading tracks:

I also started adding a dirt road at the far end of the yard from the refinery, near where the ice house and Rocky Mountain Drilling will be. The tape covered tracks to the right are the caboose track (foreground) and the ends of the classification tracks. The road is still wet from the glue. Tomorrow after it's dry, I'll add more detail to the road - larger dirt, gravel and rocks along the center of the road and between the tire ruts for both lanes.

 

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: Flyover Country
  • 3,507 posts
Posted by York1 on Monday, February 22, 2021 6:31 PM

I've enjoyed following your progress.

 

Pruitt
You know, I always expected scenery would be my favorite part of building a layout. So far, it's been one of the most stressful.

 

That's true for me, too.  Before I started the layout, I really thought the scenery would be enjoyable.

What I found was that I really enjoyed the trackwork and the wiring.

I also found that something I didn't think I would like, scratching structures, has become the most enjoyable.

 

Keep up the good work -- even though I don't write here very often, I am interested in your photos and your layout.

York1 John       

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Monday, February 22, 2021 6:26 PM

Mark, since the rest of us are enjoying your progress, try not to let it be stressful for you. Easier said than done, I know, but keep at it. It is looking great.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Monday, February 22, 2021 6:11 PM

Thanks, Douglas and Dave!

You know, I always expected scenery would be my favorite part of building a layout. So far, it's been one of the most stressful. Hopefully I'll start to enjoy it more as I learn what works for me and what doesn't, but right now I'm pretty much clueless, and that's not a feeling I like very much.

At this point I'd rather be building benchwork, laying track or even wiring. Those things I'm well versed at.

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 13,313 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Friday, February 19, 2021 10:08 PM

Doughless
Looks great Mark.

I agree.

What I like most about the ballast is the difference in size and colour of the various pieces. It looks good on a spur. It's not too neat, and it is a nice contrast to the more even ballast that a mainline would have.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Heart of Georgia
  • 4,602 posts
Posted by Doughless on Friday, February 19, 2021 8:56 PM

Looks great Mark.

I hand paint rails too.  I make sure to use a chisel edged brush.  I move fast and basically aim the point of the chisel onto the base where the rail meets the ties.  Paint works its way up the sides of the rails, but onto the ties of course.  I don't bother to paint ties individually since it seems that the color of the dirt on the sides of the rails is the same as the color of the dirt on the ties near the spikeheads.  I find that the big stroke of the chisel brush puts the color in both places and gets me pretty far along to the final product.

It looks like you did some nice work to the ties before painting the rails.  That might make the process more tedious in wanting to just get the rail paint onto only the rails.

Looks great though.  Time well spent IMO.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Friday, February 19, 2021 8:31 PM

19 February 2021

I redid the area where I messed up with the alcohol, this time using straight water, and within a couple of days I had the entire area "redirted":

When I scraped off the alcohol dirt, I got a little too rambunctious and gouged out a couple good-sized chunks of the cork sheet (translation: I was PO'd and took out my anger with the putty knife). Before I applied the new dirt I applied some runny plaster to the depressions with a putty knife to ease the exposed edges of the cork (the next day, after I cooled down). By the time I finished the dirt, the biggest depression looked like this:

Can't hardly see the depression, can you? It a bit more apparent in person. This is in the Rocky Mountain Drilling Company's pipe yard, so I plan to make it look like this depressed area is a muddy morass every time it rains (I have no idea how I'll do that yet. Any "idears" out there?).

So with the dirt re-laid and dried to almost rock-hardness (I checked thoroughly), I decided it was time to ballast the spur.  I mixed up a batch of my real sifted dirt about half-and-half with Woodland Scenics coarse and fine cinder ballast, and added about 20% wallpaper paste powder (for the fixative). I applied and groomed it with the traditional spoon and foam brush, and in short order had this:

(Clearly I need to touch up the spots next to the ballast where there's no dirt). I doused the ballasted track with water to activate the wallpaper paste.

The next morning, before I cleaned off the excess ballast from the rails and ties, I had this:

Hmmm. I think I should have darkened the dirt with a bit of black tempera powder. Maybe the next section of track I will.

Just for laughs, and because I'm playing with my new cellphone with the 68 megapixel camera, I plopped a flatcar onto the track near the end of the spur and took this shot (I still hadn't removed the excess ballast granules):

That looks kinda promising!

So I cleaned up the ballast and painted about a 12" length of the rails:

Boy! Painting rails is even more tedious than repacing ties at rail joiners! In 20 minutes, I only got this much done:

And that's where I'm at tonight.

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 14, 2021 8:27 PM

Pruitt

Rich,

Those roof panels are pretty thin. Will gluing them together along the edges be strong enough to keep the joints from separating when you lift them off the supports? There will be a pretty strong bending force through there. If that does work, please let me know.

Mark, I spoke before I looked. I have a Walthers Cornerstone roundhouse. I was imagining that the roof sections rested on top of the wall dividers between stalls. But, when I took a couple of roof sections off the roundhouse, I realized that the wall dividers actually fit up into the roof sections. Each roof section has a raised ridge on either side of the section set in by about 1/16". The wall divider, about 1/8" thick, fits up inside those ridges. So, gluing the panels together will not probably not support handling.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, February 14, 2021 6:50 PM

14 February 2021

Boy, this scenery stuff is kicking my tail! I just can't seem to get the hang of the simplest parts.

All that "tempera/plaster "dirt" I put down a few days ago didn't set. I went to vacuum up the loose bits, and big chunks came up into the vacuum cleaner! I wound up taking it all back off. 

I had sprayed the area with alcohol before sifting on the dirt, then used alcohol to wet it thoroughly afterwards. Maybe that's the problem - the alcohol won't make the plaster cure. I did some subsequernt coats of more dirt and used water on them. Maybe the alcohol inactivated the plaster somehow, because it sure didn't bond. So now I'm starting over in just a small area to see if I can get it right.

Super Angry

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, February 14, 2021 1:01 PM

Rich,

Those roof panels are pretty thin. Will gluing them together along the edges be strong enough to keep the joints from separating when you lift them off the supports? There will be a pretty strong bending force through there. If that does work, please let me know.

I glued scale 6X12 styrene strips at the front and back of the roof sections, then painted them flat black. That was enough to block the light at most of the gaps. Maybe I just don't have enough thickness on the roof sections that are a bit warped. I think I'll try gluing a second one on top of the first and see if that does it.

The really amazing part is that there are no obvious leaks between roof sections on the top. 

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 21,843 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 14, 2021 5:36 AM

Pruitt

I also finished round one of light-proofing the rebuilt roundhouse.

You can't see any leaks in this picture, but on a front view there's a couple small places that show some light at the roof panels, where the panels are slightly warped. All I can think to fix that is to glue those couple of panels permanently onto the roundhouse, and I'm not sure I want to do that. The leaks are small, so I might just live with them, or try some black electrical tape.

Here's the current state of the loading rack:

Mark, I have similar problems with the roof of my roundhouse and, like you, I prefer not to glue down the individual panels. While I have yet to do this myself, I intend to glue three roof panels together but not glue them to the wall structures so that they are still removable. That would go a long way toward resolving the uneveness of the individual panels. Mine is a 9-stall roundhouse, so I would have three sets of roof panels instead of nine once I glue three together as one.

As far as light leaks are concerned, Evergreen Scale Models makes styrene sheet as thin as 0.005" which could be glued on the underside of the roof panels to fill the gaps and block light leaks without materially affecting the thickness of the roof panels that rest on the wall structures.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,922 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Saturday, February 13, 2021 10:05 PM

Thanks Dave and David.

Bear, if you're real good, I may let the shop foreman cut some ventilation holes in the box for next time.

13 February 2021

Things are progressing slowly. After a few days work applying plaster then painting it, I added dirt to the far end of Casper yard. 

Now I'm not sure how to proceed in this area. Lots of details to be created, including the pipe yard for the drilling company, the building(s) for the company itself, and the ice house needs to be built. I might go ahead and build the grade crossings and dirt roads in this area, and leave all the other stuff for later. But what little bit of greenery and grass and what-not that will be in this area has to wait for all the other stuff to be built.

I also finished round one of light-proofing the rebuilt roundhouse.

You can't see any leaks in this picture, but on a front view there's a couple small places that show some light at the roof panels, where the panels are slightly warped. All I can think to fix that is to glue those couple of panels permanently onto the roundhouse, and I'm not sure I want to do that. The leaks are small, so I might just live with them, or try some black electrical tape.

Here's the current state of the loading rack:

One more section and it's done for now. Later on one final section will be added when the tracks are extended. The benchwork will have to be in place towards Powder River for that, though.

  • Member since
    October 2020
  • 1,703 posts
Posted by NorthBrit on Friday, February 12, 2021 5:14 AM

A good job done making the dirt road,  Mark.

Here in the UK,  to make 'earth'   we often use dried tea leaves.   After having a cup of tea, dry the leaves.  They are now earth brown in color.   Sprinkle over the required area.   Instant earth.     

Railroad modelers in the U. S. A.  should drink tea.   Laugh Laugh Laugh

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!