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Ogden & Cache Valley RR - Layout Construction

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  • Member since
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 10:29 PM

Onewolf
My goal is for this house to be my last/final house before the big dirt nap.  So to me, it makes sense to design it to be as accessible as possible.  36" doors is an easy way to help this.

Mine too, but I can't put 36 inch doors on the inside. This is a very good idea.

I will need to struggle my wheelchair through 30 inch doorways.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

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Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 9:16 PM

Onewolf
My goal is for this house to be my last/final house before the big dirt nap.

Yeah, when I bought my house in Wenonah NJ, I planned to be hauled out out of it feet first at some point in the future.

I've lived in six different houses (owned four of them) since then. Big Smile You never know what life will throw at you next.

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Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 4:22 PM

The 36" interior door requirement is based on my desire to provide access for someone in a walker or wheelchair.  It could be either of my parents (early 80s) or me as I age. My goal is for this house to be my last/final house before the big dirt nap.  So to me, it makes sense to design it to be as accessible as possible.  36" doors is an easy way to help this.

 

Now, back to our regularly scheduled subject.  Trains.  I got most of the classification yard track pulled up last week, but I'm up in Tennessee this week meeting with builders so no progress on layout deconstruction.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:26 PM

Here, as long as there is a 36" door into the house, as a secondary exterior door, your slider would not needed any special approval. In fact, unless it was part of a larger project, it would most likely be done without a permit and the inspection authority would be happy you did not bother them for that.

Our 1901 Queen Anne had five exterior doors when we bought it. Two were 36", the other three only 28".

Two of the smaller doors allow you to go from the dining room or the family room out onto the side sections of the wrap around porch.

The other small door was at the bottom of the rear staircase in the kitichen and took you onto a small service porch. We eliminated the door and that little porch.

Then we added a 6' slider in a different area of the kitchen/breakfast area out onto a deck which had a canvas awning system for summer.

So we still had five doors, and a basement bulkhead door.

Sheldon

 

    

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, May 10, 2021 8:40 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
A 6' wide patio slider does not open to 36", and 5' sliders are legal as well and they only open about 27" in most cases.

I had to get a code variance on the permit for my new sliding rear door.

The original door was a two panel pocket door that had a 60" open width. The new door only has one sliding panel and only opens to a only little more than 24 inch width.

There is a travel stop that prevents the door from being opened far enough to damage the blind controls for the rigid door panel

It was easy for the contractor to get the variance from the city. The new door is rated for category 5 storms, and that improvement will get almost anything approved.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:40 AM

Standard wheelchairs will go thru 30" doors, but it is not fun.

Bigger is better.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:39 AM

Doughless

Even without codes, the builder needs to be able to fit furnaces, prefab shower units, etc into the house, and homeowners washers and dryers, so the opening has to be big enough.  Usually at least the front door and the garage.

Here in GA, we looked at some houses built as late a 2004 that had 28 inch back doors out to the deck.  I thought that was odd.

 

Washers and dryers are only 27" wide, they go thru 30" doors fine. Refrigerators are mostly all made to fit thru 30" or 32" doors with the doors removed.

Prefab showers are pretty much a thing of the past, today cheap or expensive, tile or solid surface panels.

Furnaces, air handlers and boilers are smaller than ever, they too go thru 30" doors pretty much.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:34 AM

Doughless

I tend to get into trouble talking about building codes, but its my understanding the each exterior opening must be at least 36 inches.  Front door, back door, and door to the garage.  Every modern house should have three 36 inch doors.  "Major" remodels require updating to that standard also.

 

The IRC (international residential code used as the starting point for most jurisdictions) does not require ALL exterior doors to be 36", but it is good practice to make all exterior doors that hinge 36".

A 6' wide patio slider does not open to 36", and 5' sliders are legal as well and they only open about 27" in most cases.

Requirements for renovations are all over the map, all generalizations are false.

We restore/renovate houses all the time, with permits when needed, and keep original doors less than 36", porch railings only 27" high, stairs and stair winders that are not code today.

There are a million and one exceptions.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by Doughless on Monday, May 10, 2021 10:25 AM

Even without codes, the builder needs to be able to fit furnaces, prefab shower units, etc into the house, and homeowners washers and dryers, so the opening has to be big enough.  Usually at least the front door and the garage.

Here in GA, we looked at some houses built as late a 2004 that had 28 inch back doors out to the deck.  I thought that was odd.

- Douglas

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Posted by rrebell on Monday, May 10, 2021 10:13 AM

Codes can vary by town, 36" is min. to be wheel chair accesable in general because the clear width is 32". 32" door plus hinge sticking out 1 1/2"  plus door knob sticking out 2 1/2".

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Posted by Doughless on Monday, May 10, 2021 9:06 AM

I tend to get into trouble talking about building codes, but its my understanding the each exterior opening must be at least 36 inches.  Front door, back door, and door to the garage.  Every modern house should have three 36 inch doors.  "Major" remodels require updating to that standard also.

- Douglas

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, May 9, 2021 12:27 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
Kevin, I would hope the entry doors to your house are 36".

The front door is 36 inches.

Interior doors to rooms are 30 inches. Closet doors are 28 inches. The pocket door to the 1/2 bathroom is a skinny 24 inches.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
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  • From: Maryland
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, May 8, 2021 12:21 PM

SeeYou190

 

 
Onewolf
Here's a draft version of the floorplan and basement of the house I plan to build 'up north'.

 

That looks like a beautiful place to be.

I had a good friend at work that retired to Tennessee from Florida about 10 years ago, and he is completely happy. The only thing he complains about is the sales tax rates.

 

 
Onewolf
The floorplan was in no way meant to imply it's close to a final version. I would say it's a proof of concept that all my givens/druthers fit in the space. It's amazing how much space it takes when all interior doors/doorways are at least 36".

 

36" doorways sound HUGE!

I don't know much about house planning, but the pantry door swinging into the kitchen looks like a bad idea to me. Is a pocket door possible/practical?

-Kevin

 

Yes, I have already suggested a pocket door on the pantry in my PM.

Kevin, I would hope the entry doors to your house are 36".

For interior doors it is larger than usual, but much more wheel chair friendly if one is planning for that.

32" is the more typical interior door width for most rooms. Closets, bathrooms and other special situations can require other sizes.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, May 8, 2021 10:12 AM

Onewolf
Here's a draft version of the floorplan and basement of the house I plan to build 'up north'.

That looks like a beautiful place to be.

I had a good friend at work that retired to Tennessee from Florida about 10 years ago, and he is completely happy. The only thing he complains about is the sales tax rates.

Onewolf
The floorplan was in no way meant to imply it's close to a final version. I would say it's a proof of concept that all my givens/druthers fit in the space. It's amazing how much space it takes when all interior doors/doorways are at least 36".

36" doorways sound HUGE!

I don't know much about house planning, but the pantry door swinging into the kitchen looks like a bad idea to me. Is a pocket door possible/practical?

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, May 8, 2021 6:45 AM

Onewolf, I sent you a PM.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 6:01 PM

Onewolf

Here's a draft version of the floorplan and basement of the house I plan to build 'up north'.

The basement will have 9' clear overhead.

The preliminary space for the new layout and model workshop is about 30x30 + 12x15 alcove.  That space can be expanded/contracted as needed.

Lots of room there to do lots of good things with a nice sized layout. 

Yes

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by Pruitt on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 4:57 PM

It's a hard thing to dismantle a layout you've put years of your hobby time into constructing.

Good luck! Be sure to keep us up to date on your modeling adventures!

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Posted by rrebell on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 4:36 PM

Used to design kitchens for a living and did trouble shooting for a big box store, so when you are ready.

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Posted by Onewolf on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 2:22 PM

Thanks for the floorplan critique.  The floorplan was in no way meant to imply it's close to a final version. I would say it's a proof of concept that all my givens/druthers fit in the space. It's amazing how much space it takes when all interior doors/doorways are at least 36".

I can definitely soften/angle the closet corner in the master bath, I just need to ensure my very large and heavy residential storage container device can fit in that closet and the door can open. The kitchen cabinet layout is in no way close to a final layout. The software I use has horrible tools for designing kitchen cabinet layouts.

I may add a small prep sink to the island, but again, this is just getting started. 

It took me 10 years to design my current train layout. I've got time to refine the home design/floorplan as there are no builders available to build anything currently.  :)

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 1:11 PM

I agree with rrebell, there are a few things About that floor plan I would adjust. I will offer some thoughts later.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by rrebell on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 10:22 AM

First off soften the corner on master bath by cuting into lower closet, amount up to you. 2nd move door to master to be even with family room wall, after all this door leads to your kingdom so the privacy of currant location is not needed and as a bonus the bedroom will look larger. Last you need a prep sink in the island  but many will put the full sink there and if you are going to angle base cabinet in cornder you need to angle upper or the uppers in the corner are kind of wasted space.

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Posted by Onewolf on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 8:35 AM

Here's a draft version of the floorplan and basement of the house I plan to build 'up north'.

The basement will have 9' clear overhead.

The preliminary space for the new layout and model workshop is about 30x30 + 12x15 alcove.  That space can be expanded/contracted as needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    June 2007
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Posted by riogrande5761 on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 6:03 AM

It's a good idea to save lumber.  I saved all of mine, even smaller pieces as I usually find uses for it later.  In fact I saved everything except for the plaster scenery.  It's hard to say if wood will come back to prepandemic prices; plus it will save you money next time around.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by Onewolf on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 5:15 AM

I started removing flex track this morning.  The painted Atlas code 83 appears to still be remarkably flexible and it came up fairly clean off the rigid foam insulation 'roadbed'.  On the other hand the track installed on WS foam road pulled up quite a bit of foam.

Given the stupid high price of lumber these days I'm thinking I will probably save as much of the open grid benchwork sections as possible.

I will also save all the LED layout lighting modules (2x4s ripped into 4 triangles with LED strip lights affixed with contact cement):

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

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Posted by NorthBrit on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 4:56 AM

It is always sad to read of  a dismantling of a layout;   especially a 'good one'.

I firmly believe anyone going thru such an experience,   'the next rebuild'  will be a far better layout.

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 2:20 PM

MisterBeasley

I was in the same boat a few years ago.  I got divorced and had to sell my large house with a large trainroom.  I've got a smaller trainroom now, and a smaller house.  The layout is still in pieces.  I just haven't got the enthusiasm to put it back up with all the work that will take.

 

 
Ditto.  In 2008 I got divorced and moved to another state in 2009, and in the middle of a recession to boot.  I remarried in and moved into a townhouse in 2013 and built a small 10x18 layout and moved again in 2017 and am working on a new bigger layout but having a hard time finding hobby time with all the house work etc.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 11:38 AM

I was in the same boat a few years ago.  I got divorced and had to sell my large house with a large trainroom.  I've got a smaller trainroom now, and a smaller house.  The layout is still in pieces.  I just haven't got the enthusiasm to put it back up with all the work that will take.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by Doughless on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 11:15 AM

Doug, sorry to read about the personal setback and the layout coming down.  I was interested in seeing this large layout coming together but also disappointed that it wont.

Sweetwater sound like a nice place to be, and that you have a good sized space for your use.  Onward to more positive things.  I'm looking forward to reading a new thread if you decide to share your layout progress.  Good luck.

- Douglas

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Posted by rrebell on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 9:14 AM

The trouble with marriage is " life is always greener on the other side of the septic tank". People do not plan their relationships, always get a pre-nup.  Back to the thread, sorry to hear that and wondered what happened to you. Been a few large layouts that all of a sudden were never heard from again and these were young peoplew who started the threads.

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