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Todays "Photo O' The Day"

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 1:01 PM

And today, now we're talkin'!  One of the Weary Erie's big freight hog 2-10-2's!  The Berkshires could certainly outrun them but they never really replaced them, not completely anyway, those Santa Fe types still had work to do.  

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 1:34 PM

Flintlock76
The Berkshires could certainly outrun them but they never really replaced them, not completely anyway...

Keep in mind this is the Wilkes-Barre area, not precisely what comes to mind when you say 'Erie' and 'Berkshire' in the same sentence.  Probably in heavy anthracite traffic, where small drivers and low speed would be just fine, time even then for competitive operation into that area might have been running out (the Suskie, for example, was already long gone all the long way there), and nobody -- let alone Underwood or his successor -- would be spending money for any new steam power to put in place of what they had.  

These and most of the S Berkshires would be replaced in roughly the same era, though ... and that not long.  Half a decade and most of them would be gone.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, December 8, 2020 3:25 PM

Overmod
 Half a decade and most of them would be gone.

Crying  

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:20 AM

Today's photo has an interesting follow-up.  If I remember the story correctly, one of the passengers was the Honorable Glenn Cunningham (R-Kansas).  Needless to say, he griped to the ICC and a rule was instituted that final runs had to be completed to their destination.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:27 AM

Yes, I suppose a corollary to today's photo story might be "Don't beat around the bush Burlington, tell us what you really  think about this train!"

Thing looks like a slum on wheels.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:51 AM

To me the train looks fine: a streamlined baggage for whatever M&E there is, and a modern coach.

The unintended humor is in the caption: by what stretch of the imagination would you call the post-Menk Burlington "pro-passenger"?

If I were responsible for substantial, irreversibly-increasing passenger losses (and been frustrated in getting rid of them 'fairly' despite inadequate demand or return) I might shut sufficiently-money-losing trains down as soon as "the law" said I could, too.  

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Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 7:44 PM

When I see trains that short I think "Lionel starter set".  Wink

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:36 PM

Penny, the cars and loco are a bit too long for O-27...

I remember reading an article by someone who worked onthe Denver to Billings train, but this is the first hearing about the Omaha to Billings train.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, December 9, 2020 11:12 PM

At least the Burlington bused the passengers to their destination.  In 1972 the PC discontinued the train from NY to Chatham about half way thru the trip, and left the passengers and crew stranded.

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Posted by Fr.Al on Friday, December 11, 2020 9:41 AM

Yes, my brother sent me a book in which that is mentioned. "We don't care how they get home," was how the company responded.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, December 11, 2020 10:21 AM

Today's photo isn't quite a photo but it's an interesting reminder of how long push-pull suburban trains in all their various iterations have been around.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, December 11, 2020 11:36 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
an interesting reminder of how long push-pull suburban trains in all their various iterations have been around.

Indeed.  And I imagine the "push-pulls" took some getting used to by the C&NW's veteran engineers.

Even today, engineers on NJ Transit's "push-pulls" say they take some getting used to.  One said operating in the push mode feels downright weird. 

Just for fun, here's one that can't make up its mind just what it wants to be!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14qzGcW_O2Q  

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Posted by M636C on Friday, December 11, 2020 4:47 PM

Flintlock76

 

 
CSSHEGEWISCH
an interesting reminder of how long push-pull suburban trains in all their various iterations have been around.

 

Indeed.  And I imagine the "push-pulls" took some getting used to by the C&NW's veteran engineers.

Even today, engineers on NJ Transit's "push-pulls" say they take some getting used to.  One said operating in the push mode feels downright weird. 

Just for fun, here's one that can't make up its mind just what it wants to be!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14qzGcW_O2Q  

 

Strangely enough, when push-pull trains originated in the UK, a single (steam) locomotive between two cab cars was the standard arrangement, Possibly they felt it was too risky to push a larger number of passenger cars.

Go to https://glostransporthistory.visit-gloucestershire.co.uk/Push%20Pull%20YTT.html

and scroll down to the second photo.

Incidentally, some British steam locomotives had vacuum actuated steam cut-off valves to remotely cut locomotive power when braking was required.

Peter

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, December 11, 2020 6:22 PM

The only experience I've had with a push-pull operation had this beauty on one end:

And this spectacular beast on the other!  Smile, Wink & Grin

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, December 11, 2020 9:49 PM

Strictly speaking that's a "pull-pull," but holy smoke WHAT a "pull-pull!"

If all commuter trains looked like that Cuyahoga Valley excursion people would fight to get on 'em!

You lucky lady you, having that in your "backyard!"

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, December 11, 2020 9:51 PM

M636C
when push-pull trains originated in the UK

Fascinating post Peter!  Nothing new under the sun, eh?

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Posted by MidlandMike on Friday, December 11, 2020 11:17 PM

It seems hard pressed to call it the "Photo" of the Day.  it's a illustration for advertising purposes, and it has a model railroad like curve in it that would probably derail the cars if operated on a model pike in push mode.

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, December 12, 2020 6:16 AM

Very early "push-pull" happened on Chicago's "L" lines where control trailers were common. The North Shore Line's diners were even configured as control trailers.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Saturday, December 12, 2020 10:15 AM

rcdrye

Very early "push-pull" happened on Chicago's "L" lines where control trailers were common. The North Shore Line's diners were even configured as control trailers.

 
Also consider suburban operation on the Illinois Central.  The original MU cars were operated in motor-trailer pairs (not married pairs) which were not turned so trailers always led in one direction.  South Shore's trailers were also equipped with controls although I never saw them lead.
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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, December 12, 2020 7:52 PM

Why have none of you mavens observed the consist is being pushed by the C&O Train X locomotive?  Complete with the portholes.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, December 12, 2020 9:29 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
Also consider suburban operation on the Illinois Central.  The original MU cars were operated in motor-trailer pairs...

Lackawanna's EMUs were also motor-trailer pairs.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, December 13, 2020 10:15 AM

Just to add to the confusion, consider LIRR's postwar MU cars.  They were variously control motors, blind motors (no control cab) and control trailers.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, December 14, 2020 5:26 PM

And today's shot, some street running in Milwaukee.  What a sight those two trains pulling out must have been!

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Posted by M636C on Monday, December 14, 2020 7:07 PM

Flintlock76

And today's shot, some street running in Milwaukee.  What a sight those two trains pulling out must have been!

 

I think that is just a big grade crossing, with a major road crossing multiple tracks. There is a raised boom barrier next to the distant station clock tower.

Peter

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, December 14, 2020 7:41 PM

That's 2nd St. at Clybourn, just a few blocks down Clybourn from the south side of the North Shore Line's station and only a block or so from the back side of Milwaukee Electric's station in the Public Service Building. The gates were pneumatically controlled from a tower on the east side of 2nd. This from another version of the same photo in Jim Scribbin's Hiawatha Story (Pg 73), with map checking from a couple of sources.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 4:37 PM

Today, the N&W's "Pocahontas," or what purports to be the "Pocahontas."

It's just not the same without a Class J on the head end.

Oh well, it's 1971 and Amtrak's about to take over, so it doesn't matter anymore anyway.

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Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 6:49 PM

At least it proves N&W wasn't averse to operating dome cars.  Wink

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 9:34 PM

pennytrains

At least it proves N&W wasn't averse to operating dome cars.  Wink

 

Right you are, so the photo was a bit of an education.  Now I don't have to worry about running my MTH "Powhatan Arrow" with a dome car, it's prototypical!

I don't know why I worry about that stuff anyway.  Too much of a historian I guess. You don't want to watch a historic themed movie with me...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, December 17, 2020 10:50 AM

Today's shot is a good reminder that railroaders aren't all on the limiteds and fast freights roaming the high iron.  We forget there was, and still are, a lot of unsung and forgotten guys out there doing the "grunt work" that keeps it all going.  

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, December 22, 2020 9:47 AM

Wow.  Today we've got one of those rather bizarre Union Pacific U-50's.

I don't know what to think.  Looks like it can't decide whether it wants to be a road diesel or a Sperry rail car.  At least the head-end crew had a great view of the passing scenery!

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