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Todays "Photo O' The Day"

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 23, 2020 12:58 PM

Flintlock76
And today, a doomed "Doodlebug."

But one that had more lives than a cat.  Started out as this:

https://condrenrails.com/FSVB/Midland%20Valley/images/0139-1.jpg

and was rebuilt with a RPO section keeping the GE gas engine just before WWII.  Many more sophisticated things built much later didn't soldier through to 1954.

Compare the original and the photo du jour with

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 23, 2020 1:02 PM

Flintlock76
And today, a doomed "Doodlebug."

But one that had more lives than a cat.  Started out as this:

https://condrenrails.com/FSVB/Midland%20Valley/images/0139-1.jpg

and was rebuilt with a RPO section keeping the GE gas engine just before WWII.  Many more sophisticated things built much later didn't soldier through to 1954.

Compare the original and the photo du jour with this, from 1944:

https://condrenrails.com/FSVB/Midland%20Valley/images/KO&G-M23-Calvin-OK-10-18-44-John-B-Fink.jpg

Frankly though, I think I'd prefer this... if the interior even remotely lived up to the exterior:

https://condrenrails.com/FSVB/Midland%20Valley/rr0955.jpg

Note the use of the term 'automotrice', to be made famous much later in France, used here before WWI.

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, November 23, 2020 5:40 PM

And before Doodlebugs, there was the McKeen Railcar.  A bit ahead of it's time, but for sheer coolness you can't beat it!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HYECpTcLyU  

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 23, 2020 6:06 PM

Problem with the McKeen was that it was streamlined backward, like Loewy's '50 Studebaker Commander, and it had a drivetrain with little concept of effective suspension ... let alone high-speed suspension.

Woulda been interesting to see what the Stanley's and Fred Marriott might have done with one of them, though... and while it wouldn't have worked right, with the original suspension in the Pendulum Car...

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 23, 2020 6:09 PM

Problem with the McKeen was that it was streamlined backward, like Loewy's '50 Studebaker Commander, and it had a drivetrain with little concept of effective suspension ... let alone high-speed suspension.

Woulda been interesting to see what the Stanleys and Fred Marriott might have done with one of them, though... and while it wouldn't have worked right, with the original suspension in the Pendulum Car...

... but still, it's not half as cool as the original design here:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gASe_MneZZc

(which, incidentally, marks the close of the first era of development of high-speed railcars... but I won't digress.)

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Posted by pennytrains on Monday, November 23, 2020 7:24 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

It should be remembered that motorcars were among the first steps leading to the demise of steam locomotives.

 

Yep.

Taking a tangent track: Alco or Electro-Motive?

I like Alco's diesels best.  Big Smile  Even though I live very close to where EMC was.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by MidlandMike on Monday, November 23, 2020 8:54 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

It should be remembered that motorcars were among the first steps leading to the demise of steam locomotives.

 

I look at it as the motorcars helped prolong some passenger service.  That passenger service would have gone away along with the steamers in short order.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, November 23, 2020 9:02 PM

Though this type was never used in a railroad application, here's a pair of Becky's hometown diesels still hard at work today:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=I5idpqsQYvA

Sounds kind of like a cross between a EMD 567 and a Detroit 71.  

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, November 23, 2020 9:46 PM

'Dude, the engine room on that vessel impresses the hell out of me!  Talk about spit n' polish!  And the deck's so clean you could eat off it!  And the look of the wheelhouse, polished paneling and brass as well.

There's a lot of pride in that ship, and it shows!  

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 10:13 AM

pennytrains
 
CSSHEGEWISCH

It should be remembered that motorcars were among the first steps leading to the demise of steam locomotives.

 

 

 

Yep.

Taking a tangent track: Alco or Electro-Motive?

I like Alco's diesels best.  Big Smile  Even though I live very close to where EMC was.

 
I've been an Alco fan, not surprising when you consider where I was raised, seeing EL, Monon and BRC on a daily basis.  I still have a preference for minority builders, adding NRE, Railpower and MPI to my preferences.
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, November 27, 2020 6:24 PM

Me like!  Big Smile

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, November 27, 2020 8:47 PM

Oh yeah!  "Railroading for all eternity" as the late Don Ball would have put it.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, December 1, 2020 8:28 AM

And today, a "Ghost Train!"

Ghost train all right, like a wraith in the night and under a full moon too.  Great, moody, atmospheric shot!  Like something out of a classic "Film Noir."  

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 3:22 PM

Today's shot?  Wow!  Exactly what Lucius Beebe was talking about when he mentioned "Burning of Rome" smoke effects.

Railroad management seeing that would, as Lucius would put it, have "An attack of the vapors."  But we railfans sure love it!

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 4:07 PM

Flintlock76
Today's shot?  Wow!  Exactly what Lucius Beebe was talking about when he mentioned "Burning of Rome" smoke effects.

Railroad management seeing that would, as Lucius would put it, have "An attack of the vapors."  But we railfans sure love it!

Smoke plume is much more steam than coal.  I don't think company would be that upset - if the smoke plume was solid black they would be jumping up and down as they should be in the picture pennytrains posted.

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Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 7:05 PM

Would be oil smoke from the UP loco?

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 7:43 PM

pennytrains

Would be oil smoke from the UP loco?

 

I don't think so, I enlarged the picture and it looks like a coal tender.  

Balt's probably right, that smoke plume's more "salt and pepper" than "midnight black," but I think it might still raise a few eybrows with management.  But what do I know?  I wasn't there.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, December 2, 2020 9:56 PM

Could the engine have been sanding the flues?

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, December 3, 2020 12:04 AM

Or the crew saw the photographer and turned the oil valve to the 'smoke screen' position.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, December 3, 2020 2:30 AM

This locomotive class was designed to burn low-rank lignite and would have 'too much boiler' if fired on normal bituminous.  I suspect this is related to the snuff-dipping action.

This was 1943; oil conversions wouldn't come until 1946.

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Posted by Fr.Al on Thursday, December 3, 2020 1:55 PM

Where did they get the lignite coal from? That IS a CN locomotive, isn't it? I thought it was CV at first.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, December 3, 2020 3:13 PM

No Father, Friday's engine was CN, Wednesday's is Union Pacific.  Lotsa lignite out UP's way!

And today, an Erie "Doodlebug!"  That's something you don't see every day.  I'm guessing it's a mid-day run, the heavy Wanaque-Midvale to Jersey City commuter runs were typically steam powered when that photo was taken. 

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, December 4, 2020 1:23 AM

Flintlock76
And today, an Erie "Doodlebug!"

Close, but no cigar... I rode the 5012 at the Ohio Railroad Museum in Worthington, Ohio back in the '60s:

 Erie_5012_MC by Edmund, on Flickr

A pretty gutsy-looking machine.

Regards, Ed

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, December 4, 2020 8:54 AM

gmpullman
A pretty gutsy-looking machine.

To some people, any self-propelled railcar before the RDC era was a 'doodlebug', even PRR 4666 or ATSF M190, and arguably the Stout railcar and its contemporaries like the Michelines.  I suspect there were plenty who carried this over into the early streamlined motor-train era.

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Posted by M636C on Saturday, December 5, 2020 5:20 PM

Overmod

 

 
gmpullman
A pretty gutsy-looking machine.

 

To some people, any self-propelled railcar before the RDC era was a 'doodlebug', even PRR 4666 or ATSF M190, and arguably the Stout railcar and its contemporaries like the Michelines.  I suspect there were plenty who carried this over into the early streamlined motor-train era.

 

 

One assumes the name originated in the sound of the large relatively slow running gasoline engines which gave a distinctive sound resembling the insect.

One imagines that the diesel engines of later cars sounded different and the name would have died out.

In Australia, a common name for railcars was "Tin Hare", a name given to the mechanical lures used in Greyhound racing.

This was derived from the appearance of the cars rather than their sound.

The sight of a relatively small self propelled car running through open country at relatively high speed reminded people of the mechanical lures.

Peter

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, December 6, 2020 12:45 AM

M636C
One assumes the name originated in the sound of the large relatively slow running gasoline engines which gave a distinctive sound resembling the insect.

But in the United States, doodlebugs are ant lions, vicious larvae of a particular kind of lacewing, and they don't make noise.

They are also weirdly angular and ugly, only walk backward, and are known for following irregular paths seemingly at random.

Something I had not known is that there was a beloved variant 'hoodlebug' used in Pennsylvania to descrive one of the PRR cars.

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, December 6, 2020 1:13 AM

Overmod

 

 
M636C
One assumes the name originated in the sound of the large relatively slow running gasoline engines which gave a distinctive sound resembling the insect.

 

But in the United States, doodlebugs are ant lions, vicious larvae of a particular kind of lacewing, and they don't make noise.

 

They are also weirdly angular and ugly, only walk backward, and are known for following irregular paths seemingly at random.

Something I had not known is that there was a beloved variant 'hoodlebug' used in Pennsylvania to descrive one of the PRR cars.

 

Clearly my knowledge of USA entomology is deficient.

The name doodlebug is unknown in Australia.

In England, the name doodlebug was given to the German V-1 pilotless aircraft and I understood that this was due to the distinctive buzzing sound of the pulse-jet engine. I'm not sure what insect this may have been named after.

Even the term "bug" is much less common in the UK (and Australia), "beetle" being used more commonly for small insects other than ants.

Peter

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, December 6, 2020 10:10 AM

Positive proof that we don't speak the same language.  That being said, I manage to maintain some fluency in British English by surfing the BBC News website regularly.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, December 6, 2020 10:41 PM

OK, I figured it out.

There are two doodlebugs.  The European one is also called the 'maybug' and the German word for that insect is Maikafer... a term the Germans applied to the pulse jet V1 for, you guessed it, that June-bug buzz.

Not even remotely related to the American context ... it's a good story, though.

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Posted by pennytrains on Monday, December 7, 2020 7:12 PM

M636C
in Australia.

I have an interresting anecdote about "falling on my bum" in front of an Aussie.  Wink

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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