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Peter Witt streetcars that are not PCCs

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 24, 2021 11:00 AM

Eric Oszustowicz indicates the 1st photo is at Franklin (with the tracks, and one block south of Crown Street.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 24, 2021 10:37 PM

And the second is actually on Nostrand Avenue, just north of a the single-switch connection to the single-track Holy Cross Cemetary Shuttle line, the car will rubn through a crossover and head to the carhouse.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 25, 2021 9:47 AM

further corrections by fellow ERA members:

 
Attachments3:05 PM (2 hours ago)
 
 
The Holy Cross Cemetary car returning to thr Carhouse is at Rockaway & Hegeman,
near the Carhouse.
The car on the Lorimer Lineis at Franklin and Montgomery, one block north of Franklin
and Crown, and the northeast corner of Prospect Park.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, November 29, 2021 7:34 AM

Russ Jackson sent this pre-WWII photo that was in Bill Madden's collection at 39th styreet near 2nd Avenue.  The South Brooklyn thread at Trains has a an SB fereifgt at this location, also pre-WWII and  from Russ.  This streetcar is probably on the Church Avenue Line.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, December 7, 2021 1:41 AM
From WikipediaL

Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the northwestern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood is bounded by Flushing Avenue and the Brooklyn Navy Yard to the north, Flatbush Avenue Extension and Downtown Brooklyn to the west, Atlantic Avenue and Prospect Heights to the south, and Vanderbilt Avenue and Clinton Hill to the east. The Fort Greene Historic District is listed on the New York State Registry and on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a New York City designated historic district.

The neighborhood is named after an American Revolutionary War era fort that was built in 1776 under the supervision of General Nathanael Greene of Rhode Island.[4] General Greene aided General George Washington during the Battle of Long Island in 1776. Fort Greene Park, originally called "Washington Park" is Brooklyn's first. In 1864, Fort Greene Park was redesigned by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux; the park notably includes the Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument and crypt, which honors some 11,500 patriots who died aboard British prison ships during the American Revolution.

Fort Greene contains many examples of mid-19th century Italianate and Eastlake architecture, most of which is well preserved. It is known for its many tree-lined streets and elegant low-rise housing. Fort Greene is also home to the Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower, which, for over 80 years, was the tallest building in Brooklyn.[5] The neighborhood is close to the Atlantic Terminal station of the Long Island Rail Road and has access to many New York City Subway services.

On DeKalb Avenue, looking SE toward Fort Greene Park:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
   
 
   
   
 
   
   
   
   
   
 
   
   
   
   
   

 

 

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