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New layout

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Posted by Motley on Friday, August 7, 2020 6:47 PM

I built this (removable) mountain section for the left corner, using foam peices and plaster. I did this a couple months ago, just waiting to finally place it.

I will make it look better with some more surrounding hills and trees later on.

Michael


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Posted by Motley on Friday, August 7, 2020 6:37 PM

SeeYou190

I have known the pain of needing to wait to build scenery.

The pain of not having a spot for my layout is worse!

Congratulations on the successful train runs.

-Kevin

 

 
Thanks Kevin, I really appreciate all of your help and feedback with my new layout. I can't believe its taking this long before I could run trains. But I've been taking my time to make sure I do things correctly.
 
Benchwork and wiring is not my favorite thing, but scenery and structures and running trains is really fun.
 
All the hard work is finally paying off and I am having a great time now.

Michael


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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, August 6, 2020 10:52 PM

I have known the pain of needing to wait to build scenery.

The pain of not having a spot for my layout is worse!

Congratulations on the successful train runs.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Motley on Thursday, August 6, 2020 9:22 PM

I started installing some of the power feeders on the outside mainline. I hooked up my NCE Powerhouse Pro wireless. And I ran some trains!!! for a couple hours at least. I can run about 3/4 around the outside main. Back and forth and it was really fun.

And I got some more panting done. I hate the pink foam color.

I want to start on scenery already, and I don't have all the trackwork completed.

Michael


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Posted by Motley on Monday, August 3, 2020 11:05 AM

Getin closer to finishing the two mainlines. Yes they are not dead straight, because I have 2.5" centers on the tracks, but the crossover switches are 2.25" centers. So they have to bend slightly at the switch.

Michael


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Posted by Motley on Thursday, July 30, 2020 5:21 PM

I started painting the track. I used floguil by hand with a brush.

I mixed brown, black, and dark green to get the color I wanted.

Do you guys like it?

Michael


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Posted by Lastspikemike on Saturday, July 25, 2020 8:52 AM

Motley

You don't service selenoid switch machines. They just work for ever and ever. I have never heard of a peco switch machine failing. On my last layout I had 35 Peco switch machines and never had a problem in 7 years I had that layout.

The switch will fail before the machine fails.

 

 

Always always always carefully check the wiring to a Peco turnout motor before assuming there's anything wrong with the motor. It's as simple and anvil reliable as a doorbell. They need full amperage to operate. Use a CDU if you can. 

They also make a W series that draws less current. 

Latest are the new orange coloured twistlock motors designed to clip on under the roadbed instead of directly under the turnout throw bar. 

Anyway, since the standard Peco point motor clips directly to the turnout I just treat the turnout and its motor complete with wiring harness as a single piece of track. If it goes wrong you just lift it out, fix it and return it in place. It's more likely the turnout will need repair than  the motor. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

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Posted by Motley on Saturday, July 25, 2020 5:17 AM

Still in track laying mode. Getting the mainlines for the yard almost complete.

Michael


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Posted by Motley on Friday, July 17, 2020 9:54 PM

Still laying track and making good progress. I have started the yard area as well.

I got sick of seeing that damn pink foam so I started to paint it with a dirt color for scenery base.

Michael


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Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 12:17 AM

Hi Michael,

Any progress is good progress! Your backdrop looks good!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by Motley on Tuesday, July 7, 2020 12:04 AM

I haven't updated this thread in a while. Track laying has been slow. I did get some switches, and the outside mainline. This is on the right side (Coors area).

I decided to go with Peco #8s here, for the curve entry to the yard. And using #7 curved switches here to.

And I had to remove a section of track here. There was a small bulge from the foam joints. Just shaved the roadbed some.

Michael


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Posted by Motley on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 5:46 PM

I'm taking a break from track laying. I just finished this Coors building. Its Walthers Wasington Salvage Yard. Gonna use it as a Coors maintence building.

Michael


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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, January 15, 2020 2:56 PM

Michael,

I like the backdrop!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by Motley on Wednesday, January 15, 2020 1:31 PM

Just getting more trackwork done. Left side (where the power plant)  is almost finished. And the two mainlines on the top side are almost complete as well.

Michael


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Posted by Motley on Sunday, December 29, 2019 7:01 PM

You don't service selenoid switch machines. They just work for ever and ever. I have never heard of a peco switch machine failing. On my last layout I had 35 Peco switch machines and never had a problem in 7 years I had that layout.

The switch will fail before the machine fails.

 

Michael


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Posted by mbinsewi on Saturday, December 28, 2019 2:02 PM

Maybe he could make a removable hatch in the plywood underneath, to gain access to the machine, without picking up track.

Mike.

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Saturday, December 28, 2019 2:00 PM

maxman
I really don't care for any system that requires something mechanical/electrical be buried under something else.

Sorry, but this is a rather silly statement. Any switch machine will somehow be buried under something, unless you go for those primitive attached thingies Atlas and others still sell.

Sometimes I find your humor not very humorous.

The Peco track system, including their switches and switch "motores" are highly reliable. The switch motors have one big drawback, though - they draw an awful lot of current!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, December 28, 2019 1:52 PM

maxman
I really don't care for any system that requires something mechanical/electrical be buried under something else.

.

Is there a perfect system where everything is always accessable?

.

It seems that on every layout I have built, something always winds up under something else.

.

The Peco system is very reliable. I know of two large layouts that use Peco components on all trackage with no problems.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by maxman on Saturday, December 28, 2019 1:16 PM

Motley
Another reason I like using foam, is the abilty to easily cut out the peices for the Peco switch machines to drop into.

I really don't care for any system that requires something mechanical/electrical be buried under something else.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Friday, December 27, 2019 9:02 PM

That is a good system if you use the PECO track and switch motors, no question.

While very high quality, in my case PECO is not a product that suits my needs.

Looks like you are continuing to make good progress.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by Motley on Friday, December 27, 2019 8:37 PM

Another reason I like using foam, is the abilty to easily cut out the peices for the Peco switch machines to drop into. Much easier than having to cut out these from plywood.

Michael


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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Sunday, December 22, 2019 12:42 PM

rrinker

 I throw away nothing - I still have a box full of small foam chunks. The bits you carve out for below track level scenery, you glue back on to form the bits that go above track level.

 As for spike holding - I last used spikes on a layout more than 20 years ago (ok, there was a long time in there I had NO layout...). The last two used adhesive caulk, and the next one will too. The ability of the base material to hold spikes is a non issue. In fact, the ability of the foam to take a push pin to hold track in place while the caulk set up was actually a benefit. They push in easily and they do hold with plenty of force to keep the track in place. If I used plywood, I would have to use the soup can express to hold the track in place. Push pins are quicker and I don't have to raid the pantry to weight things down.

 I may use less foam base this time, but not through any dissatisfaction with how it worked on the last two layouts. I will be using a lot for the scenery, cutting and stacking it  and then carving. 

                                  --Randy

 

 

Homasote and Homasote roadbed remain my "go to" base for track and flat scenery. 

And rolling scenery/hills/mountains will likely be plaster products over screen once again.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by Doughless on Sunday, December 22, 2019 12:07 PM

Motley

 

 
Doughless

 Motley

Douglas, you know exactly my vision for the layout.

What I plan on doing is using the foam hills to seperate the two mainline tracks.

I was thinking about adding a tunnel. But I don't have enough room there because I want to make a river scene. For the river the foam is only 1.5", and I want to make the river about 6-8" deep. I can cut out a small section for that.

 

That's how I'm approaching my under track scenery.  Except I'm building a small section that's below the prevailing sections ahead of time instead of cutting it out later.  The small section will be 48 inches high off the floor while the rest of the layout will be 52 inches high.

 

 

 

Douglas do you have a build thread? I'd sure like to see some photos of your new layout!

 

Thanks for the comment.  I don't have a photo hosting site yet, so that is a hurdle.  I'm slow, so that's another. And I've gotten distacted by doing some actual modeling like weathering trains.

I've thought about taking some photos at significant portions of the build.  Currently I've built the sky blue backdrop and the benchwork, just have to attach the plywood table top and trim out everything to give it a finished look. 

Nothing exciting about how I built a generic table top, so the finished benchwork with the plain sky blue backdrop might be the first photo. 

- Douglas

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Posted by rrinker on Sunday, December 22, 2019 11:25 AM

 I throw away nothing - I still have a box full of small foam chunks. The bits you carve out for below track level scenery, you glue back on to form the bits that go above track level.

 As for spike holding - I last used spikes on a layout more than 20 years ago (ok, there was a long time in there I had NO layout...). The last two used adhesive caulk, and the next one will too. The ability of the base material to hold spikes is a non issue. In fact, the ability of the foam to take a push pin to hold track in place while the caulk set up was actually a benefit. They push in easily and they do hold with plenty of force to keep the track in place. If I used plywood, I would have to use the soup can express to hold the track in place. Push pins are quicker and I don't have to raid the pantry to weight things down.

 I may use less foam base this time, but not through any dissatisfaction with how it worked on the last two layouts. I will be using a lot for the scenery, cutting and stacking it  and then carving. 

                                  --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by Motley on Sunday, December 22, 2019 9:51 AM

Doughless

 Motley

Douglas, you know exactly my vision for the layout.

What I plan on doing is using the foam hills to seperate the two mainline tracks.

I was thinking about adding a tunnel. But I don't have enough room there because I want to make a river scene. For the river the foam is only 1.5", and I want to make the river about 6-8" deep. I can cut out a small section for that.

 

That's how I'm approaching my under track scenery.  Except I'm building a small section that's below the prevailing sections ahead of time instead of cutting it out later.  The small section will be 48 inches high off the floor while the rest of the layout will be 52 inches high.

 

Douglas do you have a build thread? I'd sure like to see some photos of your new layout!

Michael


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Posted by Doughless on Friday, December 20, 2019 8:50 PM

Motley

Douglas, you know exactly my vision for the layout.

What I plan on doing is using the foam hills to seperate the two mainline tracks.

I was thinking about adding a tunnel. But I don't have enough room there because I want to make a river scene. For the river the foam is only 1.5", and I want to make the river about 6-8" deep. I can cut out a small section for that.

 

 

 

That's how I'm approaching my under track scenery.  Except I'm building a small section that's below the prevailing sections ahead of time instead of cutting it out later.  The small section will be 48 inches high off the floor while the rest of the layout will be 52 inches high.

- Douglas

  • Member since
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Posted by Motley on Friday, December 20, 2019 8:22 PM

Douglas, you know exactly my vision for the layout.

What I plan on doing is using the foam hills to seperate the two mainline tracks.

I was thinking about adding a tunnel. But I don't have enough room there because I want to make a river scene. For the river the foam is only 1.5", and I want to make the river about 6-8" deep. I can cut out a small section for that.

 

 

Michael


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Posted by Doughless on Friday, December 20, 2019 7:49 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

 

 
Doughless

Michael, you're not doing any grade changes or crossovers.  Foam is fine for scenery on a flat grade like you're doing.  Carve out a little gully here, build up some hills around it.  No need to do much else on a shelf layout where you're not planning a lot of verticality.  You've also planned for large buildings on each of the 4 sides, which require a big flat footprint.

 

 

 

I was not suggesting there is anything wrong with that approach. I use my share of flat areas for structures, urban areas, industries, etc.

And previously I built a multi deck layout and keeping benchwork thin was important, even on the lower level which had a staging level below that.

On that layout I simply padded the roadbed up some so that gently rolling terrain could be built on top the plywood base.

My primary dislike for foam comes from the fact that I am use to climbing/supporting myself on the benchwork........my weight will dent foam.......

Sheldon

 

I understand that neither you or anybody else was criticizing. 

I stepped in because I have a vision that Michael's layout is going to look a lot like his last one scenically.  It photographed very well, IMO.  I just wanted to illustrate the differences in scenick approaches between very open western terrain and others with narrower ROWs.  More vistas rather than trains snaking through mountains and valleys.  Rivers were the gulley type tributaries that are seen in drier parts, not so much gorges and stuff.  

The foam lends itself to those more shallow carvings.  I think RioGrande's layout was more vertical with fewer industries, so the traditional approach would work better than flat foam, IMO.

I think if somebody is looking at it from strictly building hills, stacking up foam pieces works as well as traditional hardshell and its matter of preference,  or why bother to learn something different for real no gain.

- Douglas

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Friday, December 20, 2019 6:55 PM

Doughless

Michael, you're not doing any grade changes or crossovers.  Foam is fine for scenery on a flat grade like you're doing.  Carve out a little gully here, build up some hills around it.  No need to do much else on a shelf layout where you're not planning a lot of verticality.  You've also planned for large buildings on each of the 4 sides, which require a big flat footprint.

 

I was not suggesting there is anything wrong with that approach. I use my share of flat areas for structures, urban areas, industries, etc.

And previously I built a multi deck layout and keeping benchwork thin was important, even on the lower level which had a staging level below that.

On that layout I simply padded the roadbed up some so that gently rolling terrain could be built on top the plywood base.

My primary dislike for foam comes from the fact that I am use to climbing/supporting myself on the benchwork........my weight will dent foam.......

Sheldon

    

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