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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, November 1, 2018 12:53 PM

MidlandMike
They could expand electric at the north end to close the gap near Auckland. However, at the south end, the Wellngton commuter rail is DC (3kV ?), and the mainline electrification is 25kV AC.

Do I need to say anything more suggestive than "Thalys"?

Admittedly there's a bit more concerned with providing multipower compatibility for freight service than for subsidized passenger, but in this age where both 25kV and 3kV DC would both go through a common lower-voltage DC link as part of AC synthesized drive, I don't see much difficulty for new construction or even reasonable rebuilding.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, October 31, 2018 9:17 PM

blue streak 1

KIWI rail ( New Zeland ) has decided to retain their electric freight locos.  Although not passenger it may indicate future passenger electric service /  As well KIWI studying expansion of electrification.  Main problem we see with them is it is a narrow guage operation limiting size of freight and passenger cars.

 

They could expand electric at the north end to close the gap near Auckland.  However, at the south end, the Wellngton commuter rail is DC (3kV ?), and the mainline electrification is 25kV AC.

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, October 30, 2018 9:27 PM
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Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, October 30, 2018 9:21 PM

KIWI rail ( New Zeland ) has decided to retain their electric freight locos.  Although not passenger it may indicate future passenger electric service /  As well KIWI studying expansion of electrification.  Main problem we see with them is it is a narrow guage operation limiting size of freight and passenger cars.

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, October 21, 2018 8:56 AM

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, October 19, 2018 1:44 PM

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Thursday, October 18, 2018 10:08 PM
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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 14, 2018 9:46 AM

The Haifa Carmelite is back in business, the underground funicular with six symmetrically-spaced subway stations, two trains, and one passing track between the third and fourth stations.   Brand new equipmenet.  Reopened a week ago.

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, October 12, 2018 5:56 PM

PRASA rail of south Africa is on brink of being shut down by government regulators.  This is a commuter operation in low income areas.

https://www.railwaygazette.com/analysis/single-news/view/prasa-on-the-brink-as-court-defers-safety-shutdown.html 

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, September 28, 2018 9:07 PM

Norway continues its slow but sure reductions of several lines with another reduction out of Oslo of 27 minutes by December.  See related news at end of link !

https://www.railwaygazette.com/news/infrastructure/single-view/view/vestfoldbanen-double-tracking-inaugurated.html

 

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Posted by PJS1 on Friday, September 28, 2018 1:29 PM

blue streak 1
  China set to open another 343 kM  ( ~ 215 miles ) HSR line 200kM / hr (125 MPH )  This is getting to be a recurring annoying occurrence compared to the USA!  

According to the Financial Times, the development of China’s HSR was prompted by the 2008-09 financial crisis.  It was a dramatic example of the Chinese Communist party’s debt-fueled response to the global financial crisis.  But the HSR lines have also saddled China Railway Corp with huge amounts of debt, which seems to be overlooked by HSR enthusiasts in the U.S.
 
China Railway’s total debts are approximately $750 billion.  As much as 80 per cent of the debt burden is related to HSR construction.  This is within the context of China’s total government debt, which rose from 100 percent of GDP in 2006 to 190 percent in 2016.  China’s national debt problem is worse than that of the U.S.  
 
According to government officials, the Chinese HSR network may be a debt crisis waiting to happen.  It is dependent on unsustainable government subsidies, with many lines incapable of repaying the interest on their debt, let alone principal. The company’s interest payments on its debt have exceeded its operating profit since 2015. 
 
Proponents of Chinese HSR believe it will be able in time to cover its operating expenses and service the debt.  The goal is not to have every line breakeven, but to have those that can do so carry the ones that probably never will have an operating profit.  But it could be well beyond 2040 before this outcome is realized.

Rio Grande Valley, CFI,CFII

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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 28, 2018 9:26 AM

I know/understand the reasons. CSSHEGEWISCH's sounded to me like an excuse not to have high-speed rail like China.
Regards, Volker

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Posted by PJS1 on Friday, September 28, 2018 9:01 AM

VOLKER LANDWEHR
  So please don't use not being an authoritarian state as an excuse why the USA doesn't have high-speed rail.  

The United States does not have high speed rail, at least as it is defined in Japan, China, etc., because the public has not clamored for it.  Most people are happy with personal vehicles for relatively short and intermediate trips and airplanes for the long haul. 

Money is the other reason.  At the end of June 2018 U.S. government debt - national, state, and local - was $24.5 trillion, and it is expected to grow by another trillion this year. 

Personal and corporate debt add to the burden.  Personal debt was $16.7 trillion at the end of June, and corporate debt, while not falling directly on individuals, was more than $8 trillion. 

The U.S. is awash in debt as shown by the gross amounts and as a percentage of GDP.  Federal public debt was 81 percent of GDP at the end of June, the highest it has been since WWII.  

State and federal governments are not likely to come forth with the monies to build high speed railways in the U.S.  So, that leaves the private sector or other governments to fund any high speed rail in the U.S., e.g. Texas Central Railway. 

Rio Grande Valley, CFI,CFII

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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 28, 2018 8:19 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH

 

 
blue streak 1

China set to open another 343 kM  ( ~ 215 miles ) HSR line 200kM / hr (125 MPH )  This is getting to be a recurring annoying occurrence compared to the USA !

https://www.railjournal.com/passenger/main-line/china-completes-new-harbin-jiamusi-line

 

 

I suppose that it's one of the advantages of living in an authoritarian state.

 

You don't need to live in an authoritarian state to have high-speed rail as 13 EU member countries as well as Norway and Switzerland in Europe show. In Asia you have Turkey (since a few years on the way to an authoritarian state), Japan, South Korea, Taiwan. Even India and Thailand are currently building a high-speed line.

So please don't use not being an authoritarian state as an excuse why the USA doesn't have high-speed rail.
Regards, Volker

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, September 28, 2018 6:42 AM

blue streak 1

China set to open another 343 kM  ( ~ 215 miles ) HSR line 200kM / hr (125 MPH )  This is getting to be a recurring annoying occurrence compared to the USA !

https://www.railjournal.com/passenger/main-line/china-completes-new-harbin-jiamusi-line

I suppose that it's one of the advantages of living in an authoritarian state.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by blue streak 1 on Thursday, September 27, 2018 7:38 PM

China set to open another 343 kM  ( ~ 215 miles ) HSR line 200kM / hr (125 MPH )  This is getting to be a recurring annoying occurrence compared to the USA !

https://www.railjournal.com/passenger/main-line/china-completes-new-harbin-jiamusi-line

 

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, August 21, 2018 10:06 PM
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Posted by blue streak 1 on Monday, August 6, 2018 8:27 PM
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 3, 2018 11:52 AM

charlie hebdo

Some additional information. The on-time performance given in the linked article is for long distance trains only. The punctuality measure is as follows: if the train is less than 6 minutes late it is called on-time. For less than 16 minutes it is about 90%.

I have looked for Amtrak's measures without success. Perhaps someone can help.
Regards, Volker

Edit: After a recurring search I found Amtrak's on-time definitions.

- <250 miles:  max. 10 min. after scheduled arrival
- 251-350 mi:  max. 15 min.
- 351-450 mi:  max. 20 min.
- 451-550 mi:  max. 25 min.
- >550 miles:   max. 30 min

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Friday, August 3, 2018 11:10 AM
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Posted by blue streak 1 on Thursday, August 2, 2018 1:18 PM

China is still leading in HSR with over 50% of world's total.  China's definition is 200 Km/Hr or higher (125 MPH).  Presently 26859 Km in service end of May ( 16786 miles ).  Expects 38,000 Km by  2022  (23750 miles ) .  Here is some other stats.  Comments ?

https://www.railjournal.com/index.php/high-speed/ten-years-27000km-china-celebrates-a-decade-of-high-speed.html?channel=000  

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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, April 8, 2018 4:16 AM

krtraveler
Another year with two more operators achieving the impossible.

Looks good but the circumstances are very different compared to the USA.

Deutsche Bahn (DB) is a stock corporation completely owned by the German government. The stock is not traded yet though it was planned for a long time.

The German constitution (Grundgesetz §87e) rules that the government has to secure rail transport.

Public transit and regional rail traffic is paid for by the states. The government pays annual subsidies for rail infrastructure, $5.4 billion in 2015.

As the infrastructure is government owned we have open access used by more than 150 operators.
Regards, Volker

 

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Posted by krtraveler on Saturday, April 7, 2018 5:58 PM

Another year with two more operators achieving the impossible.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 10:45 AM

TOKYO — It may have been the most profusely regretted 20 seconds in history.

Living up to Japan’s reputation for being precise as well as contrite, a train company in Tokyo delivered a formal apology on Tuesday because one of its trains left a station just 20 seconds early.

In a country where conductors will beg forgiveness when a train is even a minute late, the Metropolitan Intercity Railway Company posted an apology on its website Tuesday for “the severe inconvenience imposed upon our customers” when the No. 5255 Tsukuba Express train left Minami-Nagareyama station in Chiba, a suburban prefecture east of Tokyo, at 9:44:20 a.m., instead of as scheduled at 9:44:40 a.m.

According to the statement, the train arrived at Minami-Nagareyama on time, at precisely 9:43:40 a.m. But when it came time to leave, the overeager crew closed the doors prematurely and pulled out of the station ahead of schedule. According to Metropolitan Intercity, no passengers missed the train or complained about the jump-start.

Photo
 
Passengers at a railway station in Tokyo. A train company apologized to customers after an express left a station early. Yes, you read that right. Credit Behrouz Mehri/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

 

The effusive apology was in keeping with a culture where an ice cream company ran a television advertisement to express regret for raising the price of an ice cream bar by 10 yen last spring.

 

As the foreign news media began to cover the news Thursday, observers abroad expressed envy on Twitter at the trainspotting exactitude.

 

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Posted by cogloadreturns on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 10:04 AM

schlimm
 
Buslist
Just to put things into perspective here is a list of enhancements that the train operator (JREast and others in this case) to win the Midlands Franchise.

 

That's a lot of investment cost.  No wonder operators drop out.

 

 

The majority of which is underwritten by the taxpayer. Especially the rolling stock.

"Windy Militant leads his Basque like corn grinders to war.........." HMHB - Trumpton Riots.
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Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, October 13, 2017 9:22 PM

International passengers operators that use Kobe steel products may have quality concerns because of Kobe specification false certifications.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/12/business/kobe-steel-japan-trains.html?emc=eta1&_r=0

 

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Monday, October 2, 2017 1:46 PM

daveklepper

Europe's second largest railroad station building, a ghost station, on the French - Spanish boarder, is going to re-open.

Pull up the website:  www.bbc.co.uk/news/maga

 

   I sure hope they succeed in the resurrection.   It's always sad to see a beautiful building die from neglect.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-41445860

_____________ 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 2, 2017 6:34 AM

Europe's second largest railroad station building, a ghost station, on the French - Spanish boarder, is going to re-open.

Pull up the website:  www.bbc.co.uk/news/maga

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Thursday, September 28, 2017 9:41 PM

Apppepars Network rail ( UK) is replacing some variable tension CAT with constant tension CAT ?

http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/single-view/view/uk-railway-news-round-up-30.html

 

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, September 15, 2017 8:52 PM

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