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"Late" 4-4-0s?

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:00 AM

Paul Milenkovic

What is that lump on top of the firebox for both locomotives?

Is that for the in-transit Internet and passenger entertainment screens?Movie

 

George Drury in caption to a photo of DLW 938 (fortunately free of wing themed shrouding) states "a shroud over the turret and pop valves".

Peter

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, April 15, 2021 8:53 AM

The turret casing is handled differently on the bigger N class Pacifics than on the two smaller engines.

http://www.ebpm.com/rr/bigpix/rrsteam070b.jpg

 I just assumed the hump was, as stated, a sheet-metal cover over the top rear of the boiler.  (It is not a steam drum or indication of unusual firebox modifications during the conversion in the '20s).

The reports I've read seem to indicate that Lackawanna superheated many of their engines very early, within a decade and a half of Schmidt's introduction.  I think that someone more experienced in 'things DL&W' would know this definitively.  Perhaps Jeremiah Segrue's book on the 'streamlined' N class (ELHS Locomotive Study #2) has some coverage of the smaller locomotives too -- I have not read it.

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Sunday, April 25, 2021 6:20 PM

C&IM #502 1928

George Drury wrote that these were the last three Americans built for any railroad in North America. Yet, as Drury notes, this purchase wasn't a fluke. The railroad still ran a Springfield-Peoria passenger service daily and even upgraded its passenger car fleet by buying six steel passenger cars. The three "light, modern, efficient" locomotives "were all that was necessary for C&IM's two- and three- car trains" on the schedule, according to Drury, and could even be double-headed in a pinch.

 

By the late 1940s, passenger traffic had withered and 501 was sold for scrap. The last passenger train ran in 1953 and the surviving pair of 4-4-0s went to the scrapyard as well

The Baldwin specs addressed a service that ran on 90 lb/yard (45 kg/metre) rail, met 16 deg curves, and scaled 2% grades. Originally delivered with 63" (1,600 mm) drivers and tenders weighing 95,500 lb (43,318 kg) when carrying 8 tons of coal (7.3 metric tons), the engines acquired thicker tires and larger tenders

c&im 4-4-0 - Bing images

 

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Sunday, April 25, 2021 6:31 PM

Overmod, Everything has a prototyo, evan Thomas !

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, April 26, 2021 10:07 AM

The aforementioned C&IM coaches looked like de-motored escapees from the South Shore Line.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by nhrand on Monday, April 26, 2021 12:00 PM

LONGEVITY OF THE 4-4-0

     It should be remembered that the 4-4-0 was one of the earliest types to be built (1837) and one of the last types to be used.  Remember that the Canadian Pacific operated three 4-4-0's on the Chipman-Norton branch until late 1959 because of weak bridges.  I was one of the many railfans of that time that made the pilgramage to New Brunswick to see the three 4-4-0's.  In May 1959 I had the pleasure of photographng all three, riding the cab of A2Q 144, and making the round trip in the mixed train.  What was remarkable about the 4-4-0's was that they were producing revenue for a transcontinental railroad stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific, not some backwoods shortline.  Surprisingly, coal mining was a reason for the existence of the branch.  During the ride to Chipman the mixed train stopped at a coal mine to pick-up a loaded hopper.  Actually, the 144 was not very powerful and her boiler was not good at the time.  The engineer said that four loaded hoppers or eight empties plus the wood combine was about all the 4-4-0 could handle.  Nevertheless, steam was dead in most of the United States and Canada at the time but A1E 29, A2M 136 and A2Q 144 kept on working just as they had when built in 1887, 1883 and 1886, respectively.  All three were preserved. 

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:07 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
re Line.

Maybe Insull (owner of the South Shore and the power behind Commonwealth Edison who owned C&IM) had them adopt a modified design. Why pay money money for two designs when one will do. After all, they both carry passengers.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, May 3, 2021 10:04 AM

The first time I saw the picture of the local in TRAINS, I came to the same conclusion.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul

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