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Cardstock to use for steel coils?

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  • Member since
    August 2008
  • From: Born in Oakland, CA
  • 50 posts
Cardstock to use for steel coils?
Posted by The Mighty Oz on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 9:25 AM

October issue full of good stuff. One question about the article with instructions how to "roll your own" steel coils on pages 28 and 29...

I've used styrene and wood and metal for scratchbuilding and kitbashing since 1968, but never cardstock. Honest!

What thickness is available / used in the article? Is this something available at  large box general merchandise stores or from on line  ( nearest hobby shop is  two hours!)?

Yeah, after decades in the hobby, still learning things.

Thanks for any direction on this...

Pat Flynn

 

 

 

 

Tags: Cardstock
  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Bakersfield, CA 93308
  • 6,526 posts
Posted by RR_Mel on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 9:34 AM

You won’t have much luck searching for cardstock, it’s called chipboard.  I buy my chipboard off eBay.
 
 
Been scratch building with cardstock (chipboard) for over 50 years.
 
 
Mel
 
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
  • Member since
    March 2002
  • From: Milwaukee WI (Fox Point)
  • 11,145 posts
Posted by dknelson on Wednesday, September 5, 2018 10:31 AM

The sort of cardstock that Mel refers to is a high quality version somewhat similar to what is used by dry cleaners to keep dress shirts flat, or in crude and cheap versions is the backing for a pad of paper.  That can be a material for scratchbuilding - at one time the Japanese modelers in particular did some wonderful things with it, but is too thick for making the rolled steel coils in the article. 

I think of that more as a stiff paper than a cardstock per se - such as a 3x5 index card sort of card stock, or the cardstock of a manilla folder.  Thickness and flexibility like what we used to call construction paper in elementary school, but smoother.  Even very thick and stiff bond paper of the most expensive kind is more like it for this rolling purpose.

Dave Nelson 

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