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H0n3

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  • From: Germany
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H0n3
Posted by wedudler on Thursday, May 21, 2009 12:36 PM

Anyone in narrow gauge?

I've just build a module with transition track. And I've laid a third rail at my already finished 3'-bridge module. With this module I had spiked the rails. It was easy to lay a third rail.      Smile

Here're the two modules:

If you look carefully you can recognize the module border.

My next project will be a small wye station, made of three segments.

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by dinwitty on Thursday, May 21, 2009 6:30 PM

 I will have an HOn3 connecting line to the N&W multi railroad shelf modules. I have an existing module reworked from the club layout rescued from the scrapper torch.

It runs, about an 18"x5 foot module with sorta a timesaver layout one sided, its going to be modded to make a coal transfer to standard gauge and will have some dual gauge modded in.

The concept is a 3 foot gauge line never went out of business, it will have EBT overtones and since the original line abandoned long before, a lot of freelancing will be going on for its new locomotives.

 

 

 

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Posted by G Paine on Thursday, May 21, 2009 10:07 PM

At the Boothbay Railway Village HO scale layout we are laying subroadbed for an HOn2-1/2 loop of track to complement our existing HO scale standard gage main line. We have some narrow gage rolling stock and locomotives, but nothing will be running until later this year. Our standard gage main mine has been in since early 2008.

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

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Posted by wedudler on Tuesday, June 2, 2009 11:26 AM

 Now I've ready my first scratch build dual gauge turnout.

This will be the start for my new module Silver Creek.

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by markpierce on Tuesday, June 2, 2009 12:13 PM

Good place to start, Wolfgang, as that's the simplest form of dual-guage turnout.  Though simple, however, they aren't very interesting looking.  I like the look of a turnout where the narrow gauge continues straight and the dual guage turns off toward the side of the narrow gauge (using 3 frogs) and where the dual gauge splits with the narrow gauge in one direction and the standard gauge the other direction (using 2 frogs).

Mark

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Posted by wedudler on Tuesday, June 2, 2009 1:24 PM

 This is my plan for the module, made of three segments.

There're no compicated turnouts, no dual gauge turnouts with many frogs.

Perhaps I have to build another module ???      Smile

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by ironrails on Tuesday, June 2, 2009 2:10 PM

Wolfgang:

That first module of yours looks very good. Nicely done transition track.

Your overlapping wye is a good space saving idea, very much what a narrow gauge line would do.

If I could offer one observation, don't have too much dual gauge track. If both standard and narrow gauge are going to the same places then there's no need (economically speaking) for the narrow gauge.

I was bitten by the narrow gauge bug last summer, and I'm starting my own efforts to design and (ultimately) build a Colorado Standard Gauge (i.e.3 foot gauge) railroad.

Best regards,

Mike

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Posted by markpierce on Tuesday, June 2, 2009 2:22 PM

Wolfgang, that's a nice plan for a module.  The plan is efficient, elegant, and in character for narrow gauge especially when you provide a geographical context justifying the cramp arrangement requiring special track work.

Mark

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Posted by ccturnouts on Friday, June 5, 2009 1:17 AM

 Snip: "Anyone in narrow gauge?'

Wolfgang.......... I know you enjoy building your own turnouts as much as I do, but I'd like to offer my services on your next dual gauge module, you just pay the shipping.

I'll incorporate much of your techniques in them.  Let me know and make the module a challenging one.  I love a challenge..

Glen

Cream City Turnouts Waukesha, WI "Turning Out Turnouts since the Turn of the Century" www.ccturnouts.com
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Posted by wedudler on Saturday, June 6, 2009 3:51 AM

ccturnouts

Wolfgang.......... I know you enjoy building your own turnouts as much as I do, but I'd like to offer my services on your next dual gauge module, you just pay the shipping.

I'll incorporate much of your techniques in them.  Let me know and make the module a challenging one.  I love a challenge..

Glen

 

Glen,  I like this idea. The narrow gauge part will be code 55. You have a PM.

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by ccturnouts on Saturday, June 6, 2009 2:14 PM

wedudler

Glen,  I like this idea. The narrow gauge part will be code 55. You have a PM.

Wolfgang

 

Wolfgang,

 "PM"?  It's probably something I have or should know, but I'm baffled.

Glen

 

Cream City Turnouts Waukesha, WI "Turning Out Turnouts since the Turn of the Century" www.ccturnouts.com
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Posted by wedudler on Saturday, June 6, 2009 3:22 PM

 PM - private e-mail     Smile

 Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by Margaritaman on Sunday, June 7, 2009 12:13 AM

Speaking of HOn3 I thought you might appreciate these. A few pics of a buddy's HOn3 layout:

 

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Posted by hon3fan on Monday, June 8, 2009 10:24 AM

 Hello together,

a few FREMO-friends, including Wolfgang, working on a standard for H0n3 in FREMO.

 I have before christmas bought some turnouts of a manufacturer I  will not name, terrible quality. Fortunately I am in the spring to become aware ccturnouts.

after I have build a few special turnouts for my own station , a friend and I bought there turnouts.  I know Wolfgangs quality, if he builds turnouts! top class, really!

 ccturnouts but must not hide!

 Unfortunately, I have my selfmade turnouts already installed. but check my own homepage.

http://www.hon3fan.de/hon3fan/Bilder/Seiten/Powder_Gulsh.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glück Auf Lars My Website My YouTube Channel
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Posted by wedudler on Wednesday, July 1, 2009 3:14 PM

 Here's my first narrow gauge car, a Micro Engineering kit with Kadee trucks. Assembling those trucks without tool is .... fun.

Model railroading is fun! It's a hobby.

I'm still waiting for couplers.

 

 The code 55 track is on my short transition module. This module has two different profiles.

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by ccturnouts on Wednesday, July 1, 2009 3:52 PM

 Wolfgang,

 Nice work on the stake pockets.  I love the concept. 

BTW.... working on your turnouts, I have a question since I have your attention.  What thickness is your road bed material on the Dual Gauge main line and the thickness of the road bed material for the narrow gauge area?  Got the curved dual gauge switches done and managed to get the transition from code 83 to the code 55 within the turnout.  When I finish these turnouts, I'll send you some photos....  I took some time off this week and will be home tomorrow late.  And I have some new turnout photos that you might be interested in seeing.

 Glen  Thomas

Cream City Turnouts

Cream City Turnouts Waukesha, WI "Turning Out Turnouts since the Turn of the Century" www.ccturnouts.com
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Posted by analog kid on Wednesday, July 1, 2009 6:47 PM

Whats up with everybody doing the Colorado narrow guage? What about EBT, or the 2 ft. guage SRRL in Maine? Personally, my fav is the WWF (Wiscasset, Waterville, and Farmington), a 2 foot guage railroad that became part of the SRRL. Even have scratchbuilt 2 8ft. workcars, with 3 33ft. flatcars waiting on parts. Got plans for a module using the cars.

 Not bad for a 14 yr. old, eh?

As surely as the day is long, I am the Analog Kid. (Don't believe me? Ask me how many vinyls I listen to in a day...)
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Posted by wedudler on Thursday, July 2, 2009 1:21 AM

 

ccturnouts

 Wolfgang,

BTW.... working on your turnouts, I have a question since I have your attention.  What thickness is your road bed material on the Dual Gauge main line and the thickness of the road bed material for the narrow gauge area?  Got the curved dual gauge switches done and managed to get the transition from code 83 to the code 55 within the turnout.  When I finish these turnouts, I'll send you some photos....  I took some time off this week and will be home tomorrow late.  And I have some new turnout photos that you might be interested in seeing.

 Glen  Thomas

Cream City Turnouts

Glen,

I keep it simple. I work everywhere with 5 mm (0.2'') cork over 9 mm ( 0.35'') plywood. In the pics you see the plywood survace from the segments. I get this cork in big sheets.     Smile  But in the town I will use this cork everywhere. The track will be buried in the ground. To get this better I have an additlional sheet of 2 mm (0.08''). This way I come out just short under rail head.

Prototype pictures are always good.

 

analog kid,

that's easy, the group I belong to has decided to model this. We have a big frame, era 1930 to 1960 and DRGW, RGS, C&S in Colorado and New Mexico.

 

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by wedudler on Wednesday, July 8, 2009 3:25 PM

 Work goes on. Here's the last segment.

 

Now it's time for some track. You see the cork roadbed.

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by wedudler on Monday, July 13, 2009 3:12 PM

Harry W. Brunk’s "Up Clear Creek on the narrow gauge" is a good source of ideas and information. In part 32 describes Harry Brunk the building of his Truss Rod Bridge. This bridge will be my Silver Creek bridge.

 

 

 

The bridge is not yet finished. I run out of 8'' x 8'' strip wood. This is what I want for the bridge ties. 

 Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by markpierce on Monday, July 13, 2009 3:49 PM

Nice job, Wolfgang!

One of my favorite chapters in Bunk's book is the one on "little bridges."  Culverts and such are too often overlooked on layouts.  (Gee, how I dislike layouts where the bottom of the ties/roadbed is altitude zero.)

Mark

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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, July 13, 2009 10:13 PM

wedudler

 

Glen,

I keep it simple. I work everywhere with 5 mm (0.2'') cork over 9 mm ( 0.35'') plywood. In the pics you see the plywood survace from the segments. I get this cork in big sheets.     Smile  But in the town I will use this cork everywhere. The track will be buried in the ground. To get this better I have an additlional sheet of 2 mm (0.08''). This way I come out just short under rail head.

Prototype pictures are always good.

 

Wolfgang

 

Wolfgang,

where do you get your cork sheets from? I am looking for a source other than Conrad, which is way overpriced.

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Posted by wedudler on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 1:34 AM

Sir Madog
Wolfgang,where do you get your cork sheets from? I am looking for a source other than Conrad, which is way overpriced.

 

Ulrich, you have an email with the address from this shop here in Iserlohn.

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 2:55 AM

 ... thanks, Wolfgang!

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Posted by reklein on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 9:47 AM

Wolfgang,excellent bridge,and I agree 100%, Brunks book is one of the best. I've always liked his work ,but when he built "Little Colorado" in that mobile home,it blew me away. I've been looking at mobile homes ever since with an eye to removing the interior and building a layout in there. Imagine a 14x65 foot spaace or even a double wide. One could have a Fremo convention in there.

   Brunks research is also very thorough, way more than the average modeler needs but nonetheless interesting to know. The bit on the different styles of stock cars for instance , and roof details of boxcars another. I guess the point of this is to show how far accuracy and detail can be taken.  BILL

In Lewiston Idaho,where they filmed Breakheart pass.
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Posted by rkcartwright on Friday, July 17, 2009 1:25 AM

Say thats nice. I downloaded ur pics to study. looks like you have about as much space as me.

very nice work. 

Rory

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Posted by wedudler on Friday, July 17, 2009 12:12 PM

 Now I'm busy with scenery. I've changed the position of the two bridges. The second bridge, a trestle is still to be built. I'm waiting for bridge ties.

Here I'm placing rocks, this area needs quite a few rocks.

 

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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Posted by wedudler on Monday, July 20, 2009 2:13 PM

 Testing color - or - the fight to find the "right" color

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

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SPV
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Posted by SPV on Monday, July 20, 2009 2:16 PM
That color looks right on, Wolfgang.  Very reminiscent of southern Utah to my eye.
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Posted by wedudler on Monday, July 20, 2009 2:35 PM

SPV
That color looks right on, Wolfgang.  Very reminiscent of southern Utah to my eye.

 

And I think of CO or NM .      Smile    Smile    Smile

Wolfgang

Pueblo & Salt Lake RR

Come to us http://www.westportterminal.de          my videos        my blog

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