Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Peeling Paint Technique - Incident in Toadsuck

4103 views
8 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Peeling Paint Technique - Incident in Toadsuck
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 25, 2003 5:19 PM
I recently built my father-in-law's old Toadsuck Cannery. I made it out of basswood all nice and weather beaten. Unfortunately, I couldn't quite get the Toadsuck graphic to look weathered enough to my satisfaction so I just sanded it thinner in a few places. Ok, but it still irked me a little so I left it alone for a bit.

What do you know I come back and one of the corners has come loose. So I foolishly mash it back in place with my thumb. I'm so impatient at the end of a project. You see I happened to be eating those gumdrop sugary orange slice candies on my break, so my thumb was nice and sticky having been in my mouth a couple of times after handling orange slices. Feeling really stupid and frustrated I just left the whole thing for the next day.

I didn't quite make it to the next day so I crept up on the cannery late at night. I Flipped on the light real quick. GOOD LORD AND BUTTER, there was a huge roach moving into the cannery. One of those truly horrible deep south flying kind that chases you around the room when you prod it with a dowel. Anyway, after doing battle and vanquishing the mutant with a few forcefull flushes I checked on my poor violated cannery.

Apparently the roach had been muching on the orange scented, sugary paper of the thumb mashed Toadsuck decal. The roach had expertly simulated peeling paint by meticulously chewing away random spots on the decal and leaving very convincing ragged "peeling away" edges. I have not been able or willing to replicate this process but I am interested in less creepy techniques.



  • Member since
    March 2002
  • From: Milwaukee WI (Fox Point)
  • 11,439 posts
Posted by dknelson on Friday, September 26, 2003 7:53 AM
This idea opens new horizons in model railroading -- the creative use of vermin to aid our weathering techniques. Keep us informed ....
Dave Nelson
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 26, 2003 9:07 AM
You have discovered a whole new field in modeling. Biological assisted building. Think, we could spread cheese on our layout and let mold grow on it to simulate grass. Dress up praying mantis as gantry cranes. June bugs could be VW beetles if painted. Slug slime for water. WOW FRED
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 26, 2003 10:29 AM
Less creepy?? Try crickets!
ShayON30[:D]
  • Member since
    September 2002
  • 7,482 posts
Posted by ndbprr on Friday, September 26, 2003 10:40 AM
If you use the cricket theory you could always use them for fishbait when they are done. Of course my personal opinion is do I really want to eat anything that eats crickets?
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, September 26, 2003 2:39 PM
Cricket are good covered with chocolate. They not only taste good but have a pleasant crunch when chewed. They are high in protein too. I would never waste them on a layout. FRED
  • Member since
    November 2001
  • From: US
  • 732 posts
Posted by Javern on Saturday, September 27, 2003 6:47 AM
I'm reporting you all to PETA
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 27, 2003 8:51 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Javern

I'm reporting you all to PETA


You do know that P E T A
stands for People Eating Tasty Animals
Don't you?

Sorry just couldn't resist. [}:)]

Also it brings new meaning to the term roach motel. [:0]
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 28, 2003 3:11 PM
I never tried crickets on pita bread but it sounds good. FRED

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Users Online

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!