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Building Jordan Vehicles (Photo Intensive)

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  • Member since
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  • From: Fountain Valley, Ca.
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Building Jordan Vehicles (Photo Intensive)
Posted by Bob grech on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 7:03 PM
Here is a tutorial on assembling Ho-Scale Jordan vehicles. The assembly sequence, painting, and tips presented in this post are based from the experience I have gained over the years with this product. If you have never build one of these models, I invite you to come along with me to see how I build these cars from start to finish. Those of you who have build Jordan Vehicles in the past, perhaps I may be able to pass on some tips you may find useful:

#1 shows the Model that was used for this presentation. It is a 1928 Model “A” Ford Pick-up. However, these methods and tips can be applied to any of the Jordan vehicle line. Also shown are the minimum tools needed to assemble these models. You will also note I included Amber colored lenses (#202) and a piece of strip wood. These two items will be used to simulate headlights and wooden truck bed.



#2 shows the contents included in the kit.



#3 before assembly, it is necessary to remove any flash from all parts. A sharp razor and needle files does this job nicely. Remove the remaining details from their sprue and clean up with you razor and files.



#4 the first step of assembly is the hood. (Tip) liquid cement is used for this step. Align the left and right hood sides to the core-block. (Tip) use a flat surface, such as a sheet of glass to align the bottom of the sides with the core. Once set, glue and install the hood top (evenly centered) on core-block. Set the completed assembly aside for now.



#5 the next step is the under carriage. This should be done prior to any painting (I’ll cover that later) to insure a good glue joint. Liquid cement is also used here. Cement the rear spring onto chassis. Make sure it is centered or you will end up with a lop-side rear axle. Next, glue the rear axle onto rear spring. Assemble the front axle and spring in the same manner. (Tip) the front axle and spring can be rotated left or right to simulate a car entering a turn. At this point, the chassis and axles are ready to paint. I chose a flat black spray for both the bottom and topside including fenders. (Tip) any flat color paint will work. However, I recommend you avoid the use of gloss colors. Shinny cars tend to look toy-like to me. While you have the black out, paint the floor, seats, and cabin top. Then let dry.



#6 tires, cowling, visor, hood cabin, and truck bed are laid out prior to painting. (Tip) Cement the rear cabin wall to both left and right hand doors in order to hide/cover any glue haze with paint. (Tip) Scotch tape (sticky side up) is a great way to hold these small details in place.



#7 Floquil’s Caboose Red was chosen for the body. (Tip) paint over the tires with your main body color. I found it much easier to go back and paint the tires (black) than to neatly paint the wheel spokes (red)



#8 for the windshield, I place the cowl over the acetate and liquid glue in place. Then simply trim away the acetate for a perfect fit.



#9 install the floorboard onto the cabin subassembly. Again, use a flat surface to even the sides to bottom of floor. Next, add the seat bottom. You will find that the seat is perfectly centered within the cabin. Hence the reason the cabin was pre-assembled earlier. Add the rear seat to rest against seat bottom and rear wall. Now is also a good time to add the glass (acetate) to rear wall and doors. (Tip) I like to leave the drivers side window partly open to add life to the model. Next (CA-Glue) the gearshift and brake handle. You will find that CA is more effective and speedy when adding these small parts.



#10 Cement cowl onto cabin assy.



#11 (Tip) to ensure a good fit of rooftop, turn cabin assembly over and sand flat.



#12 Add top and visor. Again, use CA glue to install the visor in place.



#13 next comes the truck bed. I like to add small pieces of strip wood to the bed liner for that real wood look. Stain your wood prior to installing with a mix of alcohol and India ink. (Tip) 2 full tablespoons of ink to one pint of alcohol. Tacky glue is used to cement the wood onto bed liner.



#14 Cement the completed cabin, bed, and hood assemblies onto top of chassis. Make sure all parts are centered and aligned. The radiator is added next. But before installing, brush paint silver (chrome) to obtain a nice clean color separation between the two details as shown. To add those really (tiny) details such as this radiator cap. A scribe, wet with a dot of white glue, was used to hold and align the cap in place.



#15 turn the car over and CA glue the wheel in place. Note the spare wheel will be added to car using liquid cement to avoid marring of painted finish.



#16 adds the headlights, bumpers, and license plates as shown. (Tip) paint the rear of the head light assembly to match the car body. Paint the headlight wells and chrome parts using Floquils aged silver. For that super-detailed look, I like to install amber colored lenses for headlights.



#17 the completed car is weathered using my alcohol and India ink stain.



#18 here is how the car turned out. I think you’ll agree that these Jordan Vehicles really look great. I hope you enjoyed my presentation and will consider building one of these vehicles for your layout….

Bob.



Have Fun.... Bob.

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Posted by simon1966 on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 7:21 PM
Bob, thank you very much for the effort to put this together. I am on a business trip to Florida and it looks like there is a good hobby shop here in Sarasota that I hope has a Jordan vehicle to get started on.

A question. What ratio of ink to alcohol do you use in your ink wash?

Simon Modelling CB&Q and Wabash See my slowly evolving layout on my picturetrail site http://www.picturetrail.com/simontrains and our videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/MrCrispybake?feature=mhum

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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 7:24 PM
Looks fantastic. Fred
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 7:46 PM
Thank you Bob,
I haven't used A/I in the past but always flat paints and chalks. Great idea on the lens. Wood in the bed is fantastic[:D]
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Posted by Bob grech on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 8:10 PM
Simon:
The ratio of ink wash is the same that I used to weather the stripwood for the bed liner. (2 teablespoons of ink to 1 pint of alcohol) BTW, this mix can be used throughout the layout including structures made of wood or plastic.

Bob...

Have Fun.... Bob.

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Posted by fiatfan on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 8:25 PM
Bob, very nice work but (you knew there was going to be a "but", now didn't you?) how did you achieve that effect of rotted concrete on the bridge in the last picture?

Tom

Life is simple - eat, drink, play with trains!

Go Big Red!

PA&ERR "If you think you are doing something stupid, you're probably right!"

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Posted by simon1966 on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 8:31 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Bob grech

Simon:
The ratio of ink wash is the same that I used to weather the stripwood for the bed liner. (2 teablespoons of ink to 1 pint of alcohol) BTW, this mix can be used throughout the layout including structures made of wood or plastic.

Bob...


Thanks Bob, of course the information was right in front of my eyes! I guess I should focus on the forum, rather trying to watch the AI results show and the Cardinals game on ESPN at the same time.[:I]

Simon Modelling CB&Q and Wabash See my slowly evolving layout on my picturetrail site http://www.picturetrail.com/simontrains and our videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/MrCrispybake?feature=mhum

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Posted by Bob grech on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 8:35 PM
Tom: That's a trade secret! .... only kidding.

To achieve the "aged" concrete effect (btm the bridge started as a Rix plastic model) I mix floquil concrete with Durham's water putty. This adds texture to the paint. The trick is to stipple the paint onto the bridge in lieu of brushing it on. If you let the putty harden somewhat you can achieve a more textured look. Just remember to work in small patches or scrap material until you achieve the results your after. And always follow up with the alcohol stain mix as described in this post.

Bob....

Have Fun.... Bob.

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Posted by ARTHILL on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 8:52 PM
Great clinic. I got one built this year in AZ. Not as good as yours, but the learning curve is started. Eventually I want more. I am putting sound in an old brass articuated at the moment, and talk about a learning curve. The power wires greatly affect the articulation movement.
If you think you have it right, your standards are too low. my photos http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ARTHILL/ Art
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Posted by billlong on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 10:44 PM
Bob, Great work on the P.U. truck. Thanks for the very helpful tutorial. I will now take up the challenge on several Jordan vehicles I recently purchased. They do make a scene really pop when done as you demonstrated.[:D]
ps. really enjoy your posts. especially the photos. Keep up the great work.[:)][:)]
Bill Long
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Posted by ereimer on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 11:30 PM
great tutorial , thanks very much . now i'm off to check if Jordan makes anything appropriate for my 1905 layout


edit.... yes they do , they make quite a few horse drawn carts , buggies , etc.
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Posted by fiatfan on Thursday, May 18, 2006 8:57 AM
Thanks, Bob. I really appreciate the tip.

Tom

Life is simple - eat, drink, play with trains!

Go Big Red!

PA&ERR "If you think you are doing something stupid, you're probably right!"

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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 18, 2006 9:40 AM
Thanks Bob. I had often seen Jordan vehicles at my LHS but never bought one. I think you've done a good thing for Jordan. Their sales may increase due to your excellent results. I am gonna give it a try.

Trevor
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Posted by jacon12 on Thursday, May 18, 2006 2:53 PM
Bob, thank you for taking the time to make this up for us. If you don't mind a question, what cements specifically do you favor for projects like this? I'm a bit new to the world of modeling so any advice is appreciated.
Jarrell
 HO Scale DCC Modeler of 1950, give or take 30 years.
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Posted by simon1966 on Thursday, May 18, 2006 5:01 PM
I picked up 3 models today in between meetings. I wonder if Jordan will see a spike in sales of any significance?

Simon Modelling CB&Q and Wabash See my slowly evolving layout on my picturetrail site http://www.picturetrail.com/simontrains and our videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/MrCrispybake?feature=mhum

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Posted by Bob grech on Thursday, May 18, 2006 5:30 PM
Simon:

That would be cool. If I'm lucky, perhaps they'll reward me with a few complimentry models for the free advertisment.

Have Fun.... Bob.

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Posted by pcarrell on Friday, May 19, 2006 7:23 AM
Bob, not only is this great work, as usual, but it's fantastic to see how you do it.

Might I suggest a tree making clinic? You's look great!
Philip
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Posted by orsonroy on Friday, May 19, 2006 9:44 AM
Fantastic clinic; thanks!

One of the reasons that I keep feeling the tug to backdate to the 1920s is because of the really cool old cars that I could model. a '57 Chevy does nothing for me, but I'll run across a busy street to get a better look at a Model A coupe! My dream car is a '32 Packard.

Ray Breyer

Modeling the NKP's Peoria Division, circa 1943

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Posted by ezielinski on Saturday, May 20, 2006 12:59 AM
Great job building and detailing that truck. But one question - didn't Henry Ford, back in the day, say "We have any color you want as long as it's black"?
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Posted by ARTHILL on Saturday, May 20, 2006 1:08 PM
I just found a bunch at a train show for a buck. Am I gonna have fun.
If you think you have it right, your standards are too low. my photos http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ARTHILL/ Art
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 20, 2006 1:53 PM
Art, great price!!! If I could ask which ones did you find?
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Posted by claycts on Saturday, May 20, 2006 4:37 PM
Thank you for the time and effort. ever done any of the white metal cars? My wife bought me 10 of them and i can not just EBAY them away!!
Take Care
George P.
Take Care George Pavlisko Driving Race cars and working on HO trains More fun than I can stand!!!
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Posted by ARTHILL on Saturday, May 20, 2006 4:41 PM
I found a fire truck, a roadster and a pickup. Some looked pretty old. I wonder if the kits have improved much.
If you think you have it right, your standards are too low. my photos http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ARTHILL/ Art
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 20, 2006 6:42 PM
Art, I bought some kits in early 70's and a couple resently of the same, that were lost and there is no difference that I can see.
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Posted by wickman on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 1:42 PM

Just came across this excellent tutorial. Well done.

Moderator
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Posted by tstage on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 2:10 PM

Agreed.  This is the type of threads that I'd like to see more of on the forum.  I'll be bookmarking it - for sure.

Tom

https://tstage9.wixsite.com/nyc-modeling

Time...It marches on...without ever turning around to see if anyone is even keeping in step.

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Posted by hornblower on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 4:01 PM

If you think Bob did a nice job on this truck, you should see the rest of his layout!  Wow!

I have built a few of the Jordan kits with fair results.  I first built the two hot rod kits but had trouble with warped chassis on both. Unlike the large "pan" frame of the pickup kit, both of the hot rod kits came with a rather fragile frame rail chassis and both had a distinct twist.  After several less than successful attempts to straighten the chassis, I just went ahead and built both kits.  I just have to make sure I place the finished models at a bump or grade transition so that all four wheels touch the road surface.

The 40's coupe I later built came with a sturdier (and straighter) chassis.

I do like the effect Bob achieved with the amber headlight lenses. 

Hornblower

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Posted by wickman on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 7:55 PM

Hornblower do you happen to have a link to Bobs layout? Always have time for a layout lookie see.

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Posted by farrellaa on Tuesday, December 1, 2015 8:36 PM

Nice job Bob, and good tutorial. I just finished the 32 Ford coupe/hot rod and can attest to the fragility of their kits, but the results are great. I still have 6 more kits that I have bought over the past couple of years. The 32 hot rod inspired me to build a 'speed shop' just to accessorize the rod!

    -Bob

Life is what happens while you are making other plans!

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Posted by dknelson on Wednesday, December 2, 2015 7:08 PM

Some people gripe when older threads are revived but I am glad you revived this one.  Bob Grech used to post a lot of useful threads of his excellent modeling but he seems to have not posted anything here in a long time.  Many of his old threads could well stand to be revived and admired by newer members of the Forum. 

Dave Nelson

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