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In-ko-pah RR: Some new photos

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Posted by Heartland Division CB&Q on Monday, June 22, 2015 8:46 AM

Ray D. .... I've seen your photos in recent months and I am very much impressed with uour great work. 

GARRY

HEARTLAND DIVISION, CB&Q RR

EVERYWHERE LOST; WE HUSTLE OUR CABOOSE FOR YOU

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, June 22, 2015 11:31 AM

Thanks Garry!

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 11:15 PM

Here are a couple photos of a bridge I just finished. It's for a 15" gauge mine tram, that will run from the mines above Mineral Ridge, across to the mill. I gave it a planked deck because I figure they wouldn't want to risk spilling rocks onto the building, pedestrians or vehicles below. This is also the reason for the corrugated metal along the sides (plus it hides some less-than-prototypical construction elements):

 

 

 

I still need to extend the concrete base of the bent, and also fill in a couple small voids in the concrete. The bent, and most of the bridge, is made from strips of styrene textured and painted to look like wood. The deck is 6mm Sintra.

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, September 21, 2015 3:29 AM

Here are a couple small projects I worked on recently. First was making a big batch of new ocotillos to expand the foliage on the layout. I start with florist's wire, which has a green plastic coating on it. I use a couple different thicknesses, either individually, or mixed, depending on the size of the plant I want to model:

 

 

 

The next step is painting them with gesso. That's the stuff they use to prime artist's canvases. While the gesso is wet, I sprinkle on some fine grain sand available from the craft store. This goes on mainly at the lower end, to thicken the branches near the base. Then they're hung on a wire to dry:

 

 

 

 

Next I paint them with a coat of grayish-brown latex house paint. While the paint is wet I sprinkle on some green plastic grit from Plastruct, catalog #GC-104. It is then hung up to dry again:

 

 

 

I've found that the green grit fades, so the next step is to dry-brush on a bit of green latex paint:

 

 

 

To finish it off, I cut off the hook used to hang them. Then I paint some of the tips with red latex paint to represent the flowers. Finally the whole thing is given a couple coats of Krylon UV-resistant matte clear. Here are a couple photos of the plants installed on the layout:

 

 

 

 

The other little project was a test piece. I wanted to see if I could use Sintra to make a stone wall that matches the pinkish rocks on part of my layout. (I'm not sure but I think they may be rhyolite.) Here is a photo of the rocks on the layout, followed by a photo of the test piece:

 

 

 

 

I think it still needs a little work but it's getting there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, September 21, 2015 5:29 AM

Ray:

The ocotillos look very realistic!

The stone wall - well, like you said, it is coming along. Personally I think there is too much colour differentiation between the individual rocks. Perhaps a gray or beige wash might tone them down some, or maybe just a dark wash to bring out the texture.

Hope you don't mind my sharing my opinion. Actually, this is a little bit like coaching Rembrant.Smile, Wink & Grin

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by "JaBear" on Monday, September 21, 2015 6:15 AM

hon30critter
Personally I think there is too much colour differentiation between the individual rocks.

I actually disagree with Dave on the rock colours.  Living in an active geothermal region I get to see sights like this.......
Cheers, the Bear.Smile
 

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 10:18 PM

I'll get back to the pinkish rock wall later....

 

Back in May I did a foam core mockup for the Dos Manos depot:

 

 

 

Now I've finally started to work on the actual model of the depot. First I disassembled the mockup and worked out the size and position of doors and windows for each wall. As you can see by my scribblings this involved some trial and error:

 

 

 

Then I laid out the final design on a 16" x 20" sheet of 6mm thick Sintra PVC board, and cut it out:

 

 

 

Before going any further, I wanted to work out exactly what kind of stone and masonry the building would have. I decided on light tan sandstone in random courses for the bulk of the structure. Then I did a small test piece to see if I could successfully replicate that look using Sintra PVC board. Here's how the test piece turned out. I'm pleased with it:

 

 

 

With that settled, it was time to start texturing the first wall of the building. The first step in this process is to lightly sand the surface using a sanding block and horizontal strokes. This removes the sheen, and the fine scratches add a very subtle texture. Next, I used sandpaper wrapped around a dowel. This was applied with a scrapping motion, horizontally across the face of the wall. This added some more prominent scratches:

 

 

 

This close up view shows the scratches. Most of them will be obscured by the rest of the process, so they don't have to be perfect:

 

 

 

The next step involves tapping on the surface with a rock to give it a rough, uneven texture. For this you need a rock that isn't too rough or too smooth. Here's the rock I used:

 

 

 

After going over the entire surface with the rock, I used a t-square and pencil to lightly draw a series of horizontal lines on the wall. These will be used as guides when scribing the stone courses. Because I'm simulating random courses, the lines don't have to be evenly spaced:

 

 

 

 

That's it for now, more later. Enjoy!

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 10:40 PM

Ray:

This is a really interesting tutorial! I'm learning a lot and I can't wait for the next installment.

I like the rock test wall too.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by mlehman on Thursday, September 24, 2015 9:54 AM

Neat stuff, Ray!Thumbs UpYes

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, September 25, 2015 7:32 PM

Time for a quick update!

 

I began scribing the stones on the first wall of the depot. The stones are scribed using an ordinary, carbide-tipped metal scribe from the hardware store. The tool is pressed firmly into the surface -- with Sintra, you're not really scratching it, you're indenting it. Here are a few photos of my progress:

 

 

 

 

 

 

I still have to scribe the upper area of the wall (the second story portion). When this wall is done I have several more walls to do. By the time I'm finished with this building I'm going to be pretty tired of scribing stones!

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by hon30critter on Friday, September 25, 2015 9:58 PM

The stonework looks amazing, even before paint!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, September 28, 2015 7:28 PM

Well, I finally finished scribing the first wall:

 

 

 

 

But there are still a few things to do that will give the wall more depth and realism. First off, some of the scribed stones are a bit flat and could benefit from additional texturing. For this, I'll use a small scrap of old patio flagstone:

 

 

 

Here's a "before" shot of a small section of the wall, showing some of the stones that need additional work:

 

 

 

I tapped those areas with the piece of flagstone, and here's how it looks now:

 

 

 

Another little trick to add depth is to carve out a few random stones, using a sharp #11-blade hobby knife, as I've done here:

 

 

 

There is still one more thing I want to do, which will extend some of the stones out a little from the surface of the wall. However, I have to wait until after the walls have been assembled. Also I need to scribe some mortar lines in the edges of the door and window openings, and touch up a few cut marks, etc.

 

 

 

That's it for now. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, September 30, 2015 12:38 AM

I spent quite a bit of time on the second wall today. I got the door and window openings cut out, sanded the surface, applied scratches, tapped the whole surface with a rock, and made a good start on scribing the stones:

 

 

 

Then I realized something… I'd done all this on the WRONG SIDE!  

 

Doh!!!

 

I had to scrap it and cut out a whole new wall. But I'll save the bad one, and maybe I can cut off sections of it for use elsewhere.

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, September 30, 2015 1:12 AM

Hi Ray:

Happens to the best of us!

Recently I assembled a rather fancy headboard for the master bedroom. It took about 2 hours, that is, so far it has taken 2 hours. When I stood the thing up and turned it to face the front I realized that I had installed one of the key components facing the wrong way. Now I have to take most of it apart again to fix my blunder!Bang Head

How 'bout we start a club?!? We could call it the "One Step Forward - Two Steps Back Model Railroaders Association". Nah, we better not. Then we would have to start making rules and recommended practises.Smile, Wink & GrinLaugh

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, October 4, 2015 9:23 PM

Hooray! I finally finished scribing the (new) second wall, and got it right this time:

 

 

 

 

Still need to use the X-acto to carve out a few random stones, then I'll go to work on the third wall.

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by HO-Velo on Monday, October 5, 2015 9:31 AM

Ray,  Amazing work and great tutorial!   Your clever method of giving the board extra texture is right out of the stone age.  The creative use of PVC foam board appears limitless.

Thanks and regards,  Peter     

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, October 9, 2015 2:40 PM

Progress continues a piece at a time...

 

On the end wall for the west wing, I drew guidelines on the wall's edges, roughly matching the positions of the mortar lines on the north and south walls:

 

 

 

The finished west wing end wall:

 

 

 

After the walls are glued together, I'll need to use a bit of filler on the joints. At that time, I can do any necessary adjustments and touchups on the mortar lines across the joint:

 

 

 

Next I did the west wall of the central, two-story portion of the building. Most of this wall will be hidden by the west wing, so only a small area at the top of the wall had to be scribed:

 

 

 

 

That's it for now. Enjoy!

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by last mountain & eastern hogger on Friday, October 9, 2015 9:34 PM

Whistling

Hi Ray,  That is some super fine modelling on your depot.  Well done.  My question to you is about the material you are using.  I don't believe I have ever come across PVC board that you say it is.  What is it used for in one to one, and where did you get it.?

Johnboy out...............

from Saskatchewan, in the Great White North.. 

We have met the enemy,  and he is us............ (Pogo)

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, October 9, 2015 9:52 PM

Sintra PVC foam board is used for a lot of things, but mainly outdoor signs and displays. You can get it from this online supplier:

 

http://www.foamboardsource.com/sintra-pvc-foam--sintra-pvc-board.html

 

They have it in a wide range of sizes, from 8" x 10" all the way up to 4' x 8' sheets. They also have thicknesses from 1mm to 13mm. 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Medina1128 on Saturday, October 10, 2015 8:26 AM

LOVE the Sandwich Shack!

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, October 12, 2015 7:24 PM

I finished scribing the east wall of the two-story, central portion of the depot:

 

 

 

 

I also created a special piece which will be laminated to the back of the west wing's end wall, to increase the wall's apparent thickness:

 

 

 

 

Here are all of the pieces that I've completed so far. These are enough to begin assembly:

 

 

 

 

Woohoo! I've assembled the walls and it finally is starting to look like a building! The east wing, which will be an open, shaded waiting area, will be assembled separately. I'm still trying to figure out the best way to build it:

 

 

 

 

Here's a view of the south side. I still need to build the bay window:

 

 

 

 

Here's the top of the west wing's end wall, showing the special piece that was added to make it look thicker:

 

 

 

 

A view of the northwest corner:

 

 

 

 

One of the next things to do, is blend together the mortar lines at the joints. 

 

That's all for now!

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, October 16, 2015 1:09 PM

Remember that wall I goofed up and had to reject? Well, I used the top of it to make this piece, and laminated it to the rear of the south wall:

 

 

 

BTW, I've moved my website to a new web host, and this update is only on the new host. So if you can't see the above photo please let me know.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, October 16, 2015 9:34 PM

I've been working on blending together the joints at the corners of the building. In the past, I used an epoxy putty made by JB Weld, sold under the name Kwik Plastik. Apparently this is no longer available, at least under that name. So I've had to do some experimenting...

 

First I tried a product called Magic Sculpt. This is a two-part epoxy putty available from art and craft suppliers, and commonly used for sculpting. It's light gray. I applied some to a couple of corners, and after it cured I scribed mortar lines into it. It's a bit harder than the Kwik Plastik, and was a little tricky to scribe. In thin areas in sometimes flaked off during scribing:

 

 

 

 

Next I tried a JB Weld product called "Water Weld". This turns out to be very similar to Kwik Plastik, and may even be the same product under a new name. It too is a two-part putty. It is almost white when cured. It's a bit softer than Magic Sculpt, making it slightly easier to sand and scribe. It also flaked off in some spots, but not quite as badly:

 

 

 

The results of both products in this particular application were very similar, but I'd say Water Weld has a slight edge. Neither one is ideal for use on a semi-soft material like Sintra. But considering that these are supposed to be rough, random stones, the defects are not significant and will be pretty well hidden when painted.

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Saturday, October 17, 2015 2:03 PM

I wanted some of the stones to stand out from the wall, to give it more dimension. To do this, I start by gluing thin slices of Sintra to a few random stones. Then I use a hobby knife with a new, sharp #11 blade to carve them. Here are a couple before and after shots:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's the finished wall:

 

 

 

 

I won't do this to the rest of the walls until after I've added on the east wing.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by ouibejamn on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 5:50 PM

Nice. Looks like the old Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad depot in Rhyolite, Nevada. Was that your inspiration?  Having actually been in the In-Ko-Pah Mountains, all I can say about those rocks is "outstanding!".

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 9:28 PM

ouibejamn

Nice. Looks like the old Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad depot in Rhyolite, Nevada. Was that your inspiration?  Having actually been in the In-Ko-Pah Mountains, all I can say about those rocks is "outstanding!".

 

Thanks! Yes, my depot was inspired by the one at Rhyolite, as well as the Nevada Northern depot in Ely, and a couple others.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, October 21, 2015 12:49 AM

It's coming along beautifully Ray!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, October 21, 2015 9:24 PM

Because this depot will sit so close to the "edge" of the layout, a detailed interior is a necessity! However, this is the first building I've made with an interior that is also visible from all four sides. Previous structures had the rear wall against a cliff, allowing me to make that wall removable. (It also cut down on the amount of exterior detailing!) The interiors could be built into a box that slides out the back of the building.

 

On the depot, the interior box has to be accessible from below. Not a big deal but it does complicate things a bit. For one thing, the way I make and install the windows, they extend into the building slightly. So the box has to clear the windows and avoid damaging the shades/curtains. 

 

I built a recessed rim and spacers in the main structure. The rim creates an overlapping seal to help keep out moisture, as well as giving me something to put the screws into that will be used to secure the interior. Here's a view from the underside:

 

 

 

And here's a few from the top. I haven't installed the spacer on the wall at right yet, because I'm debating whether or not to add a window to that wall:

 

 

 

Here's the box which will contain the interior. The ceiling is removable and held in place with small screws:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's a shot of the underside of the building, with the box temporarily installed. For this shot I only used two screws, instead of the six that will eventually be used:

 

 

 

Note that the floor of the west wing (baggage/freight area) is also removable. This room will not have interior details.

 

 

Here's a shot looking down from the top. The second floor windows will have closed curtains, eliminating the need for detailing the second floor. Only a light will be installed there, to shine through the curtains:

 

 

 

As you can see, I've also installed the bracing for the roof of the west wing, and will soon add bracing for the main roof:

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Thursday, October 22, 2015 7:55 PM

The depot sits between two tracks, and one of the tracks curves inward a bit. To accommodate the reduced clearance, I had to taper the east wing on the south side:

 

 

 

Because the east wing is an odd shape, I decided to go with a flat roof and parapet, rather than a peaked roof. I feel this will also give the building more visual interest, and I've seen photos of a couple prototype, mission-style depots that had a flat roof on one end. I put together a mockup of the east wing and taped it to the model to see how it will look:

 

 

 

 

Before I start cutting up Sintra, I'd like to hear what others think of this design for the east wing.

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, October 22, 2015 10:23 PM

I think it will look great, not that I am any expert on southwestern architecture. The geometry of the walls of the wing means that a peaked roof would have an odd shape to it. Either the peak would not be level or the slopes would be weird. A flat roof is a logical solution.

I have always loved the look of the round roof beams protruding from the walls in structures from that area. I'm not sure if they would be appropriate for your station but they would add some interesting detail to the flat roof section IMHO.

Dave

P.S.

Don't forget the rainwater outlets.

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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