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In-ko-pah RR: Some new photos

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  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 16,515 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, October 24, 2021 11:52 PM

Ray Dunakin
I used some Lego pieces to form the basic shape, then added various bits of styrene to make it look like an old-fashioned cash register with a wooden case:

If this update would have just shown that cash register, I would have said "WOW, Ray, that is amazing!"

I am at a complete loss of words for the entire structure.

What a piece of beauty. Spectacular.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,270 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, May 4, 2022 11:47 PM

The last time I posted any progress on the Princess Shilo Mine was in March 2020, when I built the bridge from the headframe to the ore bin, and a small ore cart to go with it:

 

 

 

In September 2021 I did a bit more work, which has continued off and on ever since. To begin with, I poured a foundation for the mine's hoist house. A copper tube was embedded in foundation for use as a conduit for the wires that will eventually power the mine's lights:

 

 

 

I also started to build up a waste rock dump near the mine using multiple layers of pigmented mortar mixed with red, tan, or white stone grit:

 

 

 

When the waste pile was finished, I built a wooden chute to carry the rock from the headframe to the dump pile. It was a bit tricky because the chute is sloped downward but also turns to one side. My first attempt came out pretty wonky:

 

 

 

On the second try I built the chute in two separate sections. The first section is where they would dump the rock into the chute:

 

 

 

Brass pins hold it in place while allowing it to be removed:

 

 

 

Then I made a test fit with the second section in place. After making sure everything fit right, I glued the two sections together and painted them:

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,270 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Thursday, May 5, 2022 12:07 AM

In October 2021 I went to work on the hoist house, starting with a crude foam-core mockup to get a feel for how it would fit and what size it could be:

 

 

 

Next I made a new mockup with a different configuration. From this I was able to determine that there was enough space to extend the front room of the building:

 

 

 

At this point I didn't need to build another mockup, but went straight to constructing the building. I cut the major components from 6mm Sintra PVC board, and began gluing them together:

 

 

 

 

 

I carved a notch in the wall between the two roofs, to make room for the wires that will be needed to light the interior:

 

 

 

Once the main structure was assembled, I sprayed parts of the interior with flat black paint so they won't show through the opening for the hoist cable:

 

 

 

The interior was built as a separate unit which slides into the rear of the building. I used 3mm Sintra for this, with styrene strips to represent the wood framing:

 

 

 

The interior is fitted with two ceilings, once for each room. These are held in place with small stainless steel screws:

 

 

 

 

I painted the interior to represent both galvanized and rusted metal on a wooden frame, to roughly match what will be on the exterior of the building:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,270 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Thursday, May 5, 2022 12:36 AM

I made a door and two windows for the hoist house, using various pieces of styrene strip, then painted and weathered them:

 

 

 

I also made sheets of corrugated metal using .001" brass shim stock. These were glued to the building with Dynaflex 230, a paintable sealant:

 

 

 

 

I made a simple rain gutter above the door from a thicker piece of brass sheet:

 

 

 

Around the base of the front room I added some 2mm thick Sintra and textured it to simulate a concrete foundation:

 

 

 

I painted the building to look like the front room was added at a later date. The "original" structure has rusty, ungalvanized metal with a few newer patches, and the front room is covered with galvanized metal. The galvanized look was achieved by spraying those areas with Rustoleum's "Cold Galvanizing Compound".  The rusty sections were painted with iron paint and then treated with a rusting solution. These are sold under the"Sophisticated Finishes" brand. At this stage the rust is a bit too orange but it will darken with exposure to the elements.

 

 

 

 

I don't know how much of the interior will be visible but I wanted to try making a blacksmith's forge. I built it out of styrene. The "coals" were made by gluing a clear acrylic dome over a hole, and then gluing coarse, white stone grit to the dome. I got this grit from the craft store, and it looks like it's dolomite or something similar. I lightly dry-brushed some grays onto the grit. The lighting effect is achieved with LEDs with flicker at different rates. I got them from Evan Designs. I also built a smoke hood and attached it to the ceiling:

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 14,454 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Thursday, May 5, 2022 2:44 AM

Hi Ray.

Great stuff as always. The fire in the forge looks very realistic but perhaps the rest of it could use a spot of soot or twoSmile, Wink & Grin. I'm sure you already have that covered.

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 13,001 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, May 5, 2022 9:49 AM

Always a pleasure to see your layout, Ray.

Wayne

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,270 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Thursday, May 5, 2022 12:27 PM

Continuing on...

 

I made a large, riveted compressed air tank from styrene tube, with elliptical acrylic domes for the ends. I simulated rivets by embossing them on sheet brass which was then wrapped around the tank. Miniature brass rivets were used on the pipe flange:

 

 

 

 

I painted the tank with primer, then a coat of iron paint treated with a rusting solution:

 

 

 

The air tank was mounted on a wooden rack at the side of the hoist house. The outer ends of the rack will be supported by the rocks next to the mine:

 

 

 

I also added a goose neck lamp from Evan Designs to the exterior:

 

 

 

The completed hoist house in place on the layout:

 

 

 

 

 

Here are a couple shots of the whole mine. In the first photo I used Photoshop to remove the fence and a neighbor's tree from the background:

 

 

 

 

I haven't run wiring to the mine yet. I also want to add some lights to the headframe and ore bin, and I plan to add a few other details to the scene such as a water tank, fuel tank etc.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: Flyover Country
  • 4,495 posts
Posted by York1 on Thursday, May 5, 2022 9:05 PM

Bow

 

As usual, great work, Ray!  Amazing modeling!

York1 John       

  • Member since
    November 2007
  • From: California
  • 2,041 posts
Posted by HO-Velo on Saturday, May 7, 2022 2:03 PM

Ray, Fun to see your terrific modeling continuing on in sunny Sandy Eggo. 

Thanks and regards, Peter

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,270 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, August 21, 2022 7:00 PM

I'm still working on the railroad a bit here and there, mostly maintenance and repairs. One of my earliest structures was an ore bin located on a spur track at the southeast corner of the layout. I'm calling it the Black Rock Mine.

 

I have long planned to build the rest of the mine structures there but never got around to it. It's been so long now that the ore bin is due for replacement.

 

 

The support structure has fallen off, the ore chutes, catwalk and handrails are damaged, and the whole thing is severely weathered:

 

 

 

I started work on the replacement by assembling the profile frames which are made of 3/8" square strip wood. (All wooden components are made from Western red cedar.) Where needed, I pre-drilled holes for tie rods:

 

 

 

 

Once the profiles were complete, I began attaching them to the top and bottom timbers:

 

 

 

 

The support structure from the original ore bin was in very good condition, so I decided to reuse it. I will add additional braces to make it sturdier:

 

 

 

 

At this point I set the bin out on the layout to see how it looked, and also to test whether it would be possible to add an extension to the top. Two pieces of strip wood were placed loosely on the upper rear of the bin to give me a rough idea of where the sloped portion of the extension would fit:

 

 

 

Next I moved on to adding the planks that will form the front and rear walls, and sloped bottom, of the ore bin. When this was done I added some small strips of wood to brace the planks that will form the sides of the bin:

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the top of the front and rear walls, it was necessary to add small pieces along the sides of the frame timbers to support the short planks between the timbers:

 

 

 

Here's the bin on the layout again. If you look closely you can see some of the additional bracing that I added to the support structure:

 

 

 

 

That's all for now. I post more on this later.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: Flyover Country
  • 4,495 posts
Posted by York1 on Sunday, August 21, 2022 7:20 PM

As usual, Ray, very nice work.  Your projects are wonderful.

York1 John       

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,270 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, August 22, 2022 2:19 PM

I decided to add an extension to the top of the ore bin. I started by building a frame, and made it removable:

 

 

 

 

Then I added the planks to the front and sides:

 

 

 

This shot shows how the extension fits onto the top of the bin. I drilled some holes where I will add small brass rods to keep the two sections in alignment:

 

 

 

Next I added a frame for the sloped section at the rear of the extension:

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    November 2007
  • From: California
  • 2,041 posts
Posted by HO-Velo on Saturday, August 27, 2022 12:12 PM

Ray,  I like your work, thanks for sharing.  Guessing that the abundance of SoCal sunshine helps add realistic weathering to your fine models.

Regards, Peter  

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,270 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Tuesday, October 11, 2022 1:34 AM

Continuing from where I left off back in August...

 

I finished the sloped extension at the top of the ore bin:

 

 

 

Next I began building the ore chutes. I started by gluing in place the sloped supports. Then I added planks to form the bottom of the chute:

 

 

 

Before adding sides to the ore chutes, I test-fit the gates. I had planned to reuse the gates from the old ore bin, but I couldn't get them off without damaging them. Luckily they are still available from wildwestmodels.com. I won't permanently install the gates until after the ore bin has been painted:

 

 

 

I completed the ore chutes, then added the deck and handrails:

 

 

 

 

I plan to add stairs at one end of the ore bin. To make them removable, I first made a special bracket and glued it to the underside of the deck:

 

 

 

 

I drilled two holes through the top step of the stair and through the support bracket:

 

 

 

The stairs are from Plastruct. I glued two brass pins into the holes on the top step. I also used a razor saw to scribe "wood grain" into the plastic:

 

 

 

 

Next I added handrails and support posts. I used thick CA adhesive to glue the wood pieces to the ABS plastic:

 

 

 

I wanted another set of stairs at the other end of the ore bin, going from the deck up to a concrete platform on the cliff. I cast the platform in place using high-strength mortar mix and a form made from foam-core board and hot glue:

 

 

 

I added handrails to complete the stairs. I used four brass pins to align the stairs and hold them in place, while keeping them removable for painting or future maintenance:

 

 

 

 

That's all for now. The next step will be to add another set of stairs going from the concrete platform up to the mine. After that I can begin work on the mine structures.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 14,454 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, October 11, 2022 1:41 AM

Nice work Ray!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    March 2017
  • 7,103 posts
Posted by Track fiddler on Tuesday, October 11, 2022 4:06 AM

Good morning

Very impressive modeling Ray!  You certainly have a keen eye for detail in your CraftYes

 

TF

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