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Fateful Trip , passengers of Destiny.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 8:06 PM
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 1:28 PM

"It Was Sad When That Great Ship Went Down."

I detect the fine hand of Mike again!

Strange, but no-one has any idea of who wrote that Titanic  song, it just seemed to appear out of nowhere within weeks of the disaster.  Children were heard singing it on the streets, and the reaction was "How did kids come up with something like that?"  

Kind of like " The Worms Crawl In, The Worms Crawl Out" song, but we should save that one for Halloween!  

Oh, and the liner Teutonic  mentioned in Lawrence Beesley's account of the near collision?  That's the ship John Phillip Sousa was returning from Europe on when he composed "The Stars And Stripes Forever!"   Sousa said the march just popped into his head, he set it to paper, and never changed a note afterward.

But we'll save that one for Independence Day!

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 11:46 AM
Okay, I got Bab-O, they deliver.
 
Happy Titanic Day 
 
 
( when I was a kid we ended that song like this. " Kerplunk, it sunk, too bad, so sad" 
I'm sure there are other versions) 

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, April 14, 2020 1:59 AM


SS New York and the Titanic 

 
 
 
 
 
 
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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 13, 2020 10:02 PM

Thanks!   And a recent posting  on the Brooklyn Elevated thread refers to the Titanic -  Ciry of New York (the ship) "confrontation" at Souhhampton.

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Posted by M636C on Monday, April 13, 2020 9:32 PM

daveklepper

Here is a most unusual picture, and I will leave it to Peter to tell us all about it:

 

 

The Boyne Viaduct:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boyne_Viaduct

Years ago I was travelling on a Eurailpass which didn't apply in Northern Ireland so I got off The Enterprise in Drogheda and caught the next train back. It was a cold wet winter day but I could see the bridge from the station.

Peter

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, April 13, 2020 6:40 PM

A covered bridge!  I'll bet it's still there!

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, April 13, 2020 6:10 PM

daveklepper
... a most unusual picture, and I will leave it to Peter to tell us all about it:

Reminded me rather promptly of this:

One of the more spectacular ideas in early railroad engineering ... until you have to run locomotives that don't "consume their own smoke".  Then the tubes get progressively latticed out...

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 13, 2020 1:34 PM

A covered bridge

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, April 13, 2020 11:02 AM

That is  unusual.  I magnified the picture until I started losing resolution and I'm not sure what that structure is.  It's either a bridge built like nobodys business or a run-through engine servicing facility.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 13, 2020 10:45 AM

Here is a mosr unusual picture, and I will leave it to Peter to tell us all about it:

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Posted by MidlandMike on Sunday, April 12, 2020 11:00 PM

Flintlock76
It's also pretty apparant that Father Browne wasn't bothered by trackside poles or overhead wires...

Those poles with so many cross arms is the second most interesting subject in the photo.

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Posted by Penny Trains on Sunday, April 12, 2020 6:42 PM

That photo conjures up a lot of impressions.  A warm summer day.  The countryside.  Lazy clouds.  Just bowling along as fast or as slow as steam wants to carry you.

Trains, trains, wonderful trains.  The more you get, the more you toot!  Big Smile

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, April 12, 2020 11:48 AM

Nice cropping job David!

It's also pretty apparant that Father Browne wasn't bothered by trackside poles or overhead wires, the things that used to drive American railfan photographers nuts.

In the American rail scene today those poles and wires are as much a part of the past as steam engines themselves.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, April 12, 2020 9:18 AM

When I first posted the Enterprise photo, I noticed a small tear in the upper right corner that was disfiguring.  With lack of time, I '''corrrected" by cropping the top a tiny  bit.  I've gone back and repaired the tear on the original and corrected the first posting and repeating that here.  Peter may wish to use the corrected correction also.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, April 12, 2020 8:54 AM

Thanks, and please post some pistures important to you, your own or those of Father Frank Browne SJ.  Thanks.

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, April 12, 2020 7:47 AM

daveklepper

 

Here are two of my favorites,  the bottom the "Enterprise" Dublin - Belfast, Irish steam expresses.

 

While the present day Enterprise runs between Belfast and Dublin, in the 1950s it ran right through from Belfast to Cork via Dublin, as indicated by the curved nameplate on the locomotive smokebox.

The locomotive, CIE 402 was generally recognised as the best of its class, hence it was used on the premier train of the day. It had 28" stroke cylinders, while most of the conversions from four cylinders retained the original 26" stroke.

The train was worked from Belfast to Dublin by the large 4-4-0s of the Great Northern Railway of Ireland, so this photo is between Dublin and Cork in the 1950s.

So the train ran the full length of Ireland from Belfast in Northern Ireland to Cork in the south of the Republic. Cork was where the Titanic called in to drop Father Browne off.

I don't think I've ever seen the nameplate for the Northbound train which presumably read "Cork-Dublin-Belfast". The plates were carried on both the CIE and GNRI locomotives.

This train was converted to diesel operation in the late 1950s using the AEC railcars of the GNRI, generally similar to the CIE cars illustrated earlier in this thread, with a trailer buffet car for refreshments.

Peter

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, April 11, 2020 10:14 PM

Here are two of my favorites, the top the Dublin - Cork train, the bottom the "EnterpriseP Dublin - Belfast - Cork, Irish steam expresses.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, April 11, 2020 12:35 PM

Another idea:  You who have copied some of the pictures into your hard-drive and/or USB device, tell us which one or two pictures mean most to you and why and post them on this thread.  Eventually, there will me material for book that will go beyond just the pictures.  Some  current views of the locations might also be of great interest.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 6, 2020 10:28 PM

All the above makes sense.  Possibly the best course is simply to suggest to the Davison Brothers that the book would be a winner and that others on this Forum and I would be happy to help in any way, including some possible corrections.

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Posted by M636C on Monday, April 6, 2020 7:37 PM

Overmod

 

daveklepper
I would like to see Father Frank Browne SJ'a trains photos presented in an orderly manner in a printable PDF ...

 

I'm ASSuming (as you were the one forwarding the e-mail) that you have secured the necessary full written permissions from Davison for rights and use of the material.  It seems to me that they would be the appropriate source both to put together and to host the resulting files.

The work then becomes ordering the pictures to go in the 'collections' in order referenced by their existing site URLs -- and providing any 'corrected' versions of the images to the Davison site webmasters or whoever for inclusion.  Then sending appropriately indexed files with the updated information to be appended via metadata... with their understanding on how to format it, use it, and allocate any rights to the associated novel intellectual-property content.

 

Would all of those permissions be required for what is essentially private non commercial use?

More significantly, there appear to be numerous errors in the captions as reproduced on the website. The photo of the 4-4-0 I identified as an NCC U2 class (an inside cylinder 4-4-0) was identified as a GSR 400 series, (an outside cylinder 4-6-0). This leads me to believe that at least some of the captions were written after the photos were recovered, and not by the photographer.

Peter

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, April 6, 2020 11:14 AM

daveklepper
I would like to see Father Frank Browne SJ'a trains photos presented in an orderly manner in a printable PDF ...

I'm ASSuming (as you were the one forwarding the e-mail) that you have secured the necessary full written permissions from Davison for rights and use of the material.  It seems to me that they would be the appropriate source both to put together and to host the resulting files.

The work then becomes ordering the pictures to go in the 'collections' in order referenced by their existing site URLs -- and providing any 'corrected' versions of the images to the Davison site webmasters or whoever for inclusion.  Then sending appropriately indexed files with the updated information to be appended via metadata... with their understanding on how to format it, use it, and allocate any rights to the associated novel intellectual-property content.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 6, 2020 6:45 AM

I would like to see Father Frank Browne SJ'a trains photos presented in an orderly manner in a printable pdf, much as what we download for free on this website and what I have done for distribution to friends and those requesting from Jack May's many trip reports.  Brian Solomon has the knowledge and skill to do this by himself.

If I were to do it, I'd need a collaborator (or collaborators) to put the pix in logical order, show the location each photo on a map of the oveall Irish railway system(s) and add any necessary comment to the good father's comment  for each photograph.

Anyone wanting one or more of the Jack May trip pdfs can request at 

daveklepper@yahoo.com

If you want all, it may take several days.  Otherwise, Eastern Eureope?  UK?  USA Streetcar?

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 6, 2020 12:53 AM

Flintlock, thanks for responding and your comments.  Pretty certain Father Browne, SJ, used Plus-X Panchromatic or its equivalent with a red filter.

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:52 PM

M636C

 

AEG is a German electrical company that translates as "General Electric Company" although it was not associated with GE.
 

Similar to how ASEA (now the "A" in ABB) translates into General Swedish Electric Company, though the Swedish word for Company is usually abreviated as "AB".

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, April 5, 2020 8:12 PM

Overmod

 

 
M636C
No, I believe the diesel engines were upright. They were mounted under the floor but at the outer edge of the floor just inboard of the body side. I think they were standard AEC Bus engines of 9.6 litres and 125 HP.

 
I don't claim to be an expert on Irish Diesel Multiple Units.
 
However, I understood that Multi-Engine Diesel (MED) was a description of suburban railcars that ran on the NIR out of Belfast.
 
The engine builder was the Associated Equipment Company (AEC). It was "Associated" with the London General Omnibus Company and the logo was similar to that used by London Transport after it absorbed the LGOC.
 
AEG is a German electrical company that translates as "General Electric Company" although it was not associated with GE.
 
The cars we are discussing were initially built for the GNRI and were based on railcars built by AEC for the the English Great Western Railway. CIE bought some to the same design and took over a share of those of the GNRI when it was split up between CIE and NIR.
 
The design thus dates back to the late 1930s. By placing the engines upright on the side of the vehicle, the crankshaft (and gearbox) could be lined up with the driveshaft along the side to the truck, all of these easily accessible from the side (once the streamlined panels were removed).
 
The CIE railcars pictured in this thread had all this exposed with just a wire mesh cover to protect the engine.
 
Flat versions of the engine were developed for underfloor engined buses in the late 1940s and 1950s and these were used on British Railways cars, partly because the BR clearances were more restricted than those in Ireland (and those on the former broad gauge lines of the GWR).
 
The underfloor version allowed a central driveshaft which looked neater than the Irish version without the streamlined covering.
 
Peter
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, April 5, 2020 4:15 PM

daveklepper

In general. I wish to correct Father Frank Browne JG's images only to correct fading due to age or other specific imperfections like tears or holes or dirt.  But there is one exception:

The photo from the website:

The modification I would like:

Can you understand why?  I think if the good Father were still alive, I could convince him that a black daytine sky is a real forboding of doom, and I would not like to be resonsible for publishing such an image.  But the picture is a great one.  Does my modification loose any of its greatness?  Comments requested.

 

This is tough, I'm not sure what to think, I may do a bit of thinking out loud, so bear with me.

Photo One, the more "contrasty" of the two.  The first things my eyes are drawn to are the clouds, with the dark sky they really "pop" out at you.  Photo Two, my eyes are drawn to the locomotive, everything else is secondary.  

As a railfan I should choose #2, since I could care less about clouds.  But #1's a bit more "artsy," for lack of a better term. 

Honestly I like them both!  I'd have to flip a coin if I had to choose one!

I do wonder what Father Brown used when he took the shot.  Panchromatic or orthochromatic film?  They were both available at the time.  A yellow or red filter, or just a plain lens?  Film and lens options in black and white photography will affect the finished product. 

Anyway, thanks for that color shot M636C, that's a beautiful engine!

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:25 AM

M636C
No, I believe the diesel engines were upright. They were mounted under the floor but at the outer edge of the floor just inboard of the body side. I think they were standard AEC Bus engines of 9.6 litres and 125 HP.

These were MEDs, right?  If I remember correctly these were re-engined to have the two AEG engines and this might explain why they would be upright and not flat.  There is also a later class (from 1957) that had two AEG (and later slightly more powerful Rolls-Royce) engines.

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Posted by M636C on Sunday, April 5, 2020 9:08 AM

daveklepper

In general. I wish to correct Father Frank Browne JG's images only to correct fading due to age or other specific imperfections like tears or holes or dirt.  But there is one exception:

The photo from the website:

The modification I would like:

Can you understand why?  I think if the good Father were still alive, I could convince him that a black daytine sky is a real forboding of doom, and I would not like to be resonsible for publishing such an image.  But the picture is a great one.  Does my modification loose any of its greatness?  Comments requested.

 
I think the locomotive is from Northern Ireland, from the Northern Counties Committee, probably a class U2...
 
 
 
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Posted by M636C on Sunday, April 5, 2020 8:59 AM

daveklepper

I stand corrected.  Thank you.  Is your photo of the two cars also the one in Father Frank Browne SJ Collection?  Or did you obtain it elsewhere and where?  And I gather the diesel was a flat design under the floor?

 
Yes, the photo is from the Father Browne collection.
 
No, I believe the diesel engines were upright. They were mounted under the floor but at the outer edge of the floor just inboard of the body side. I think they were standard AEC Bus engines of 9.6 litres and 125 HP.
 
Peter

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