Railway Preservation in the UK

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Railway Preservation in the UK
Posted by NorthBrit on Friday, October 30, 2020 3:58 PM

If I  may I would like to post a few photographs of steam engines that run in the UK

Here is 60103 Flying Scotsman at 'Locomotion' Museum,  Shildon, County Durham

 

60163 'Tornado'  on the Wensleydale Railway, North Yorkshire.

 

I have other photographs  and if accepted I would like to post them.

David

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, October 30, 2020 5:33 PM

Nice shots David, thanks for posting them!  And I wasn't aware "Flying Scotsman" was operational, good to know!

Certainly, if you have more photos to share I'm sure we'd all like to see them!

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Posted by kgbw49 on Friday, October 30, 2020 5:45 PM

Very nice. First class all around!

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Posted by Lithonia Operator on Saturday, October 31, 2020 12:14 AM

I recently saw a video of a special train pulled by Tornado that went, briefly, over 100 mph. The shots from in the cab made it look pretty scary! The engine crew seemed pretty tense, not that I blame them.

I'm sure most folks here would enjoy seeing your pix. Welcome aboard.

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, October 31, 2020 6:38 AM

Thanks for your comments everyone.   'Tornado'  was built in 2008 by The A1 Steam Locomotive Trust.  The number 60163  is the follow on number after the last Class A1 was built.    The following gives a little history of the locomotives 

https://www.a1steam.com/history/

 

Here is Tornado last year (2019)  taking on water at Leyburn Station, North Yorkshire.

 

David

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, October 31, 2020 6:56 AM

In 2018 after a long overhall, Flying Scotsman was back 'in service'.  Her first run was London Kings Cross to York.  That day, near Peterborough,  some 'idiots' stood on the track to take pictures as the train was approaching?  The train had to stop and Police had to come and order the people away.

Immediately afterwards new railing had to be built along the side of the track to stop people trespassing on the railway.  one such place where new rail was built was at Newton Hall, Durham City.   Before the new fece it was a great place to take pictures.  Now, as can be seen, not so.

Here is Flying Scotsman at Newton Hall on its way to Edinburgh,  the week after the Peterborough incident.

David

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, October 31, 2020 8:08 AM

Grosmont Station on The North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

Here is London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) Thompson Class B1 No. 1264 

 

Here are two views of NER locomotive 2238   also at Grosmont and information of the locomotive.

https://www.nymr.co.uk/lner-q6-0-8-0-no-63395

2238 running round the coaches.

and about to depart for Pickering.

David

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Saturday, October 31, 2020 9:30 AM

Thanks David.  I love the Whitby - Grosmont - Goathland area and the NYMR. Visited several time, starting in 1968 before they started. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, October 31, 2020 9:35 AM

Beautiful engines, no doubt about it!  Form and function blended perfectly, kind of like a Spitfire or a Mosquito.

Man, they sure mean business with that fence!  Looks like something out of a horror movie!

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, October 31, 2020 9:41 AM

charlie hebdo

Thanks David.  I love the Whitby - Grosmont - Goathland area and the NYMR. Visited several time, starting in 1968 before they started. 

 

Hi Charlie.  My pleasure.    When I worked in Leeds (many years ago)  a colleague would visit the Whitby Pickering line and take several photographs.  When the North Yorkshire Moors Railway opened he left work and joined NYMR.

Years later my work took me to the area.  Loved the scenery, but could never get to see the railway.   

Now retired I can visit preserved railways in my area.  (I could before lockdownSoapBox)

David

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Posted by 54light15 on Saturday, October 31, 2020 10:55 AM

I've been to the NYMR three years ago- that is a serious railway. Those Yorkshiremen don't screw around! 

I was at Penn Station in New York with some friends in 1969 when the Flying Scotsman was there. A guy involved with it said how it was almost lost at sea during a storm as it was deck cargo on the ship. In 2004 I was at the museum in York and talked to a guy and mentioned that. He said that it might have been him that told me as he was on the North American trip too. 

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, October 31, 2020 11:40 AM

Flintlock.  The fence does deter anyone.   The old wooden fence almost disintegrated and it was great to see engines much closer (than now).

54light15.   Interesting story indeed. Thanks for telling.

 

Not all steam engines are standard gauge.  Here are two pictures of  the 15 inch gauge  Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway in Cumbria.  

https://ravenglass-railway.co.uk/about-us/

 

'River Mite'  built in 1966  passing at Irton Road. 

 

'Northern Rock'  built in 1976 on the turntable at Dalegarth Station.  The finance to build the locomotive came from the Northern Rock Bank.  Hence the name.

David

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Posted by ORNHOO on Sunday, November 1, 2020 7:57 PM
Thank you for posting pictures of the Ravenglass and Eskdale. I rode the "Ratty" in the seventies when I was staying with friends in Beckermet. We also rode the Lakeside and Haverthwaite, I hope it is still running.
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Posted by NorthBrit on Monday, November 2, 2020 6:37 AM

ORNHOO
Thank you for posting pictures of the Ravenglass and Eskdale. I rode the "Ratty" in the seventies when I was staying with friends in Beckermet. We also rode the Lakeside and Haverthwaite, I hope it is still running.
 

 

My pleasure ORNHOO.   I try to capture any steam running whenever I can.  Mostly it is diesels these days;  even on 'Laal Ratty'.  The Lakeside & Haverthwaite Railway is  still in operation. Big Smile

 

Three views of steam engines at Beamish Museum, County Durham, UK.

 

 

 

David

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, November 2, 2020 8:02 AM

What a neat little tank engine!  Like something from "The Isle of Sodor."

Yeah, a silly thing to say, but I couldn't resist!

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Posted by NorthBrit on Monday, November 2, 2020 9:38 AM

Yes.  A lovely engine.   There are a number of engines that visit and are run on the railway.

Beamish Museum has another railway section with very early locomotives.

 

 

The museum is well worth a visit (when this Covid stuff ends).

David

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 2, 2020 10:20 AM

Is there a museum specializing in early road steam, specifically including Trevithick's from 1802 and Goldsworthy Gurney's work?

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Posted by NorthBrit on Monday, November 2, 2020 10:40 AM

 

 

(quote user="Overmod"]

Is there a museum specializing in early road steam, specifically including Trevithick's from 1802 and Goldsworthy Gurney's work?

 

[/quote)

 

These may help Overmod

https://collection.sciencemuseumgroup.org.uk/people/cp31639/goldsworthy-gurney

 

https://museum.wales/articles/2008-12-15/Richard-Trevithicks-steam-locomotive/

 

David

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, November 2, 2020 11:05 AM

Thanks for those links NorthBrit!  It's neat to see those folks at the museum take that Trevithick replica out and play with it once in a while!

Even more interesting to think about the world the original came into in 1804,  216 years ago, and how incredibly the world would change in the rest of the 19th Century.   

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Posted by 54light15 on Monday, November 2, 2020 11:36 AM

In the animated film "Triplets of Belleville" from 2003, a Trevithick locomotive is accurately depicted. Part of a dog's nightmare as I recall. 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 2, 2020 12:03 PM

More specifically, what came in between 1801 and 1804, when instead of a least-expense low-speed colliery tug, you actually take advantage of a high-pressure engine:

http://www.steamcar.net/brogden-1.html

Note the reasons given for its 'failure to thrive' -- a little reminiscent of Emett's machine that did the work of three men and a boy.  But still... imagine if there had been a 'good roads' movement associated with MacAdam, or if vulcanizing had been developed a couple of decades prior...

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, November 2, 2020 1:11 PM

And then there was Capitaine  Cugnot, a French army engineer, who in 1769 came up with a self-propelled steam carriage.  Didn't work out for various reasons but hey, sometime's you've just got to push the technology just a bit to engineer some progress.

Here it is in replica.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KP_oQHYmdRs  

Can you imagine a fleet of those things hauling 24-pounder siege guns around the Yorktown battlefield?  

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Posted by 54light15 on Monday, November 2, 2020 4:20 PM

No wonder the British required a man with a red flag to precede road vehicles, until 1904 anyway. Regarding the Cugnot, I've heard that it had a habit of crashing into walls which might have been one reason why they weren't adopted by the French army. 

The Tampa Bay museum is amazing, I've met Alain Cerf several times. He's quite a character. Anyone who would build a Cugnot would have to be. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, November 2, 2020 5:51 PM

54light15
Regarding the Cugnot, I've heard that it had a habit of crashing into walls which might have been one reason why they weren't adopted by the French army. 

I guess parallel parking the thing would have been out of the question too.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:03 AM

Give Cugnot a break, he did design a traction engine that worked reasonably well.  Steering gear would have to come later.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:18 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH

Give Cugnot a break, he did design a traction engine that worked reasonably well.  Steering gear would have to come later.

 

Hey, I have nothing but respect for the good Capitaine, the French army's engineers and artillerymen were the best in the world at the time, bar none.

And as I said, sometimes someone's  got to push the technology a bit to see where it can go.  Everyone knew about stationary steam engines at the time, Cugnot tried to see if he could make one do just a little more.  Even though the design was a failure you've got to hand it to him for trying.  

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:41 AM

Flintlock76
I guess parallel parking the thing would have been out of the question too.

Only because it does not have a formal reverse gear.  On les aura!

There was another replica of the vehicle made in the mid-Thirties, which can be seen (briefly being crashed) in a German movie about steam history.  

Note that the steering-bar arrangement is not just a double tiller -- think of it as like an early version of a bus steering wheel.  Even with the appallingly high polar moment of inertia on that front wheel, I think an adequate ratio for turning (and very low road kickback) would be present.  As with automobiles, a little familiarity is good.

The problem more likely revolves around the lack of proper suspension, braking, or a somewhat Reliant-Robinish predilection to tip if turned too quick.  ISTR there was a problem with the lack of steam generation combined with fixed cutoff -- it used the same mass flow whether or not 'towing' something.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:47 AM

54light15
No wonder the British required a man with a red flag to precede road vehicles, until 1904 anyway.

If I remember correctly, that law and the ridiculously low road speed limits were 'arranged for' precisely because of capable steam carriages, of which there were getting to be many toward the end of the 1820s.  While Trevithick's was too small to pay, and Gurney's still a bit clunky to steer, there were some interesting developments (like the use of elliptic springs as wheel spokes) that would rapidly have made use of many of the principal roads "problematic" at best for many forms of equitation.  I think of it as a "must consume its own smoke" that kept its teeth...

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Posted by 7j43k on Monday, November 9, 2020 11:12 AM

Loved the video!  The original of Cugnot's vehicle is in a museum in Paris.

Interesting reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicolas-Joseph_Cugnot

Also interesting, as illustrated in a very nice photo, was how linear motion was transformed to rotary motion.

I wonder why there never was a New and Improved Modele Deux.  Or would that be a Dash Deux?

 

Ed

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, November 9, 2020 4:03 PM

7j43k
I wonder why there never was a New and Improved Modele Deux.  Or would that be a Dash Deux?

I don't know myself and can't find out why, but I'd say the simplest explanation is the best.  There was probably no money available.  It was around this time the French army was overhauling it's artillery arm to the new Griveaubal System, and that was going to be expensive!

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