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New From The Wilds Of Upstate New York!

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New From The Wilds Of Upstate New York!
Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, February 18, 2021 5:19 PM

REALLY upstate, you could throw a rock and hit the Province of Quebec!

Mr. Harrison's got a new video premiering at 8:00 PM EST.  Here's the link:

https://youtu.be/INoLeegLGxY   

Shot recently, and I'll tell you, that young man's got a lot more guts than I do going out in the cold like that!  I don't thaw as fast as I used to!

See you later!

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, February 18, 2021 7:26 PM

Nice job!

Yep - it's cold here in northern NY.  I'm about 150 miles west of Harrison.  If it weren't for the 1000 Islands, I could see Ontario.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Murphy Siding on Thursday, February 18, 2021 11:25 PM

Very good video. Interesting to me, is that we never see a train with only one locomotive up front.

Thanks to Chris / CopCarSS for my avatar.

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Posted by rdamon on Friday, February 19, 2021 6:36 AM

Thanks for letting us know.  Kind of fun being at a premiere!!

Needed to go put on a coat to watch!!

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, February 19, 2021 8:45 AM

Murphy Siding

Very good video. Interesting to me, is that we never see a train with only one locomotive up front.

 

That is  a bit unusual, so much so that modelers who agonize over such things are wondering if they're being prototypical with only one locomotive pulling the train.  

Looks like Harrison provided an answer!  

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, February 19, 2021 12:49 PM

Murphy Siding

Interesting to me, is that we never see a train with only one locomotive up front.

Watching trains on the Deshler cam will reveal numerous trains with only one unit leading.  It usually means one should be looking for a mid-train, or possibly a rear, DPU.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
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Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, February 19, 2021 1:54 PM

Quite true.  I've noticed on some CSX trains heading into Clearing that one unit on the point generally means a DPU midtrain.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by MidlandMike on Friday, February 19, 2021 9:26 PM

In the last scene of the video, what is the structure over the track that vaguely looks like a catenary support?

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, February 19, 2021 10:12 PM

MidlandMike

In the last scene of the video, what is the structure over the track that vaguely looks like a catenary support?

I'm guessing high/wide sensor...

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
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Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, February 19, 2021 10:14 PM

MidlandMike
In the last scene of the video, what is the structure over the track that vaguely looks like a catenary support?

High Car Detector

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Posted by jeffhergert on Saturday, February 20, 2021 7:06 PM

tree68

 

 
Murphy Siding

Interesting to me, is that we never see a train with only one locomotive up front.

 

Watching trains on the Deshler cam will reveal numerous trains with only one unit leading.  It usually means one should be looking for a mid-train, or possibly a rear, DPU.

 

A few of our empty autorack trains sometimes only have one engine on the train.  Usually one does mean there will be more in a DP consist(s).

It's happened a few times when a heavy train has broken in two in a less than ideal location.  The head end doesn't have enough power to shove back and recouple the train. 

Jeff

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Posted by Harrison on Saturday, February 20, 2021 7:54 PM

I'm sorry guys, I haven't been on the forum and I didn't even see this thread! THanks for starting it Wayne. The structure is indeed a high/wide detector, along with detecting hotboxes, stuck axles, etc. They actually picked up a "hot wheel" the other day on the 252. 

Lately 252/253 have been running with a solo engine, and I haven't figured out why yet. They seem to have enough tonnage to warrant two, especially since they have to switch two yards along the way. 

Thanks for watching and the kind comments everyone!

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

My YouTube

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, February 20, 2021 10:01 PM

Harrison
Lately 252/253 have been running with a solo engine, and I haven't figured out why yet. They seem to have enough tonnage to warrant two, especially since they have to switch two yards along the way. 

Thanks for watching and the kind comments everyone!

They only warrant the use of two engines if they have more tonnage than one engine is able to to get over the ruling grade.  If you have the opportunity to look at a railroads 'Tonnage Charts' you will be amazed at how much tonnage some engines are able to haul by themselves.

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Posted by zugmann on Saturday, February 20, 2021 10:48 PM

BaltACD
If you have the opportunity to look at a railroads 'Tonnage Charts' you will be amazed at how much tonnage some engines are able to haul by themselves.

Never mind the fact those charts were made based on what an engine could do when it was brand new, and all bearings on all cars are perfect, and no wind resistance...

 

..assuming a frictionless plane with no gravity. 

 The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Saturday, February 20, 2021 11:04 PM

We aren't allowed to see the locomotive tonnage ratings anymore.  I guess they're afraid of guys complaining about overtonnage trains.

From train tonnages it seems that CN rates a 6 axle AC traction unit at 10,000 tons across most of our western Canada mainline.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, February 21, 2021 7:54 AM

zugmann
 
BaltACD
If you have the opportunity to look at a railroads 'Tonnage Charts' you will be amazed at how much tonnage some engines are able to haul by themselves. 

Never mind the fact those charts were made based on what an engine could do when it was brand new, and all bearings on all cars are perfect, and no wind resistance... 

..assuming a frictionless plane with no gravity. 

You are overlooking the exercise factor that gets applied to locomotives just like people.  The more tonnage they handle, them more they can handle - bulking up their muscles. Cool  They aren't getting older, they are getting stronger .... just like you.

As flawed as tonnage ratings may be, they are the only things one has use when figuring how much tonnage an engine can haul over a given section of railroad - a all sections are not the same.  Depending upon the specific territory, on ratings I have, A GE AC can be rated as high as 14250 tons per unit or as low as 3100 tons per unit.  Other territories have ratings between these extremes.

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, March 5, 2021 11:55 AM

Bumping this back to the head of the line because...

Mr. Harrison's got a new video premiere tonight at 7:30 EST!

Here's the link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQEqC1HfJLk   

I'll be watching!

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, March 5, 2021 8:21 PM

Turns out Harrison is related to a friend of mine in the next town, and may be coming for a visit.  I'm sure we'll get together while he's here.

When the friend contacted me (because he knows I'm a railfan), he mentioned that this young man was from the Plattsburgh area.  I asked if his name was Harrison, and lo and behold, it is!  Small world department.

Nice video, by the way.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
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Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Harrison on Tuesday, March 9, 2021 11:29 AM

Thanks Larry and Wayne, glad you enjoyed. Here's the video embedded for those who haven't seen it yet.

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

My YouTube

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Posted by North Country Trains on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 6:22 PM

Last minute short video coming out tonight:

https://youtu.be/tQ-tb-Jxls8

 

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Posted by Harrison on Thursday, March 11, 2021 6:46 AM

Another (short) video that I filmed last Friday. I was surprised how many people watched the "premiere", 13 people to be exact. Anyways, enjoy!

https://youtu.be/tQ-tb-Jxls8

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

My YouTube

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, March 12, 2021 9:02 PM

Nice catches there Harrison!

Puzzling, TWO big ol' engines on one short train?  Seems like a waste, but what do I know?

Interesting old bridge!  Looks like it might be a good subject for some stills!  

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, March 12, 2021 10:24 PM

Flintlock76
Puzzling, TWO big ol' engines on one short train?  Seems like a waste, but what do I know?

Might need them in the other direction.  I suspect the second unit was dead-in-tow.  Boxcarred, as we usually say.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Harrison on Saturday, March 13, 2021 7:56 AM

Wayne, the NS/CN run throughs almost always have two units. This is so they have enough power to pull a potentially longer train south from Canada, and because they pick up/drop off a bunch of cars in Saratoga and Mohawk Yard. Some days they have no cars for Canada, so they just run two engines light! 

The bridge is still in use, I just haven't shot a train there yet. I wanted to multiple days this past week, but it just hasn't worked out. 

Tonight I'm premiering my most epic Plattsburgh area railfanning video. It's a long one, and it premieres at 7:30 Eastern.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ujoq829A_Dc

Enjoy!

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

My YouTube

  • Member since
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  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, March 13, 2021 9:37 AM

Harrison
Wayne, the NS/CN run throughs almost always have two units. This is so they have enough power to pull a potentially longer train south from Canada

Oh, so that's the reason!  Makes sense.

Lokking forward to your next premiere!  I'll be there!

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Saturday, March 13, 2021 10:02 PM

Harrison

Wayne, the NS/CN run throughs almost always have two units. This is so they have enough power to pull a potentially longer train south from Canada, and because they pick up/drop off a bunch of cars in Saratoga and Mohawk Yard. Some days they have no cars for Canada, so they just run two engines light! 

The bridge is still in use, I just haven't shot a train there yet. I wanted to multiple days this past week, but it just hasn't worked out. 

Tonight I'm premiering my most epic Plattsburgh area railfanning video. It's a long one, and it premieres at 7:30 Eastern.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ujoq829A_Dc

Enjoy!

:

Harrison, Nice video. I noted that at 18:26 (the second car following the power) is a tank car with a frame around it. Do you or anyone else know what this type of tank car is used for and why it is different from the common tank cars used for oil and other tank cars

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Saturday, March 13, 2021 11:22 PM

Electroliner 1935

Harrison, Nice video. I noted that at 18:26 (the second car following the power) is a tank car with a frame around it. Do you or anyone else know what this type of tank car is used for and why it is different from the common tank cars used for oil and other tank cars

Not a tank car, that's a short covered hopper.  This type has a body made of either stainless steel of aluminum (I can't remember which) and is normally used to carry bulk solid reactive chemicals, Sodium Chlorate being a common cargo.  They are regular sights around here, as their loads form much of the chemical concoction that turns trees into paper.  Not surprisingly they are placarded (Sodium Chlorate is an oxidizer) and cannot be marshalled next to a locomotive. 

The car in the video seems to be missing the large "PROCOR" lettering and I can't read the reporting mark, perhaps it has been sold to a different owner.  Here's how they originally looked:

http://s3.amazonaws.com/rrpa_photos/41039/UNPX%20127504.JPG

Note the second air line, these cars have truck-mounted air brakes, and the second pipe is needed to connect the car control valve to the piston(s) on the A-end truck.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Monday, March 15, 2021 12:09 AM

SD70Dude

Not a tank car, that's a short covered hopper.  This type has a body made of either stainless steel of aluminum (I can't remember which) and is normally used to carry bulk solid reactive chemicals, Sodium Chlorate being a common cargo.  They are regular sights around here, as their loads form much of the chemical concoction that turns trees into paper.  Not surprisingly they are placarded (Sodium Chlorate is an oxidizer) and cannot be marshalled next to a locomotive. 

I know sodium sulfite is one of the chemicals used to make white liquor for the kraft process, but don't recall sodium chlorate being used for papermaking. This doesn't mean that sodium chlorate isn't used as I am far from being omniscient with respect to paper making. My guess it would be a bleaching agent to make paper white.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, March 15, 2021 12:19 AM

I'm a railroader, not a chemist.  All I know is that those cars are regular sights at most pulp and paper mills out here. 

They are not the only ones.  Short little tank cars of sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide (among other things) are equally common sights at the same mills.

Even without the placards their loads are easy to identify, as they are stencilled on the exterior of the car. 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Monday, March 15, 2021 10:12 PM

Understood.

My comment about not being omniscient is that while I haven't heard of sodium chlorate used for paper making does not mean it isn't being used for paper making.

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