A crappy topic

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A crappy topic
Posted by zardoz on Sunday, April 08, 2018 1:27 PM

Right now, dozens of train cars carrying 10 million pounds of poop are stranded in a rural Alabama rail yard.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/03/us/parrish-waste-poop-train-alabama-trnd/index.html

Gee, I wonder why the residents are unhappy.

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Sunday, April 08, 2018 2:49 PM

10 million lbs. is 5,000 tons - even at only 50 tons per car (it might load 'light'), about 100 cars or about 1 train's worth; the cited 252 tractor-trailer loads @ 20 tons each = 5,040 tons, so that checks.  

- PDN.

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by samfp1943 on Sunday, April 08, 2018 6:31 PM

Noted in the accompanying article: "...Hall said the stench permeates everything. The rail yard is across from a baseball field and next to a softball field. Parrish only measures about 2 square miles, and pretty much everything is within smelling distance.

"It greatly reduces the quality of life," Hall said. "You can't sit out on your porch. Kids can't go outside and play, and God help us if it gets hot and this material is still out here." On Tuesday, when Hall spoke to CNN, the temperature in Parrish reached 81 degrees.
"You can't open your door because that stuff gets in your house. It's really rough," Parrish resident Robert Hall told CNN affiliate WVTM. Other residents said the waste smelled like dead bodies..."
 
I think the working phrase in this story will be "When,Not IF"... Note, as well, the article does not mention the involved railroad(?)...Whistling  

Sam

 

 


 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, April 08, 2018 6:40 PM

Well I'll be, there really is a "Poo-Poo Choo-Choo!"

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Hope for all concerned it's out of there by July!  99 degrees Farhenheit is considered a "cold snap" down in Alabama!

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, April 08, 2018 9:03 PM

samfp1943
I think the working phrase in this story will be "When,Not IF"... Note, as well, the article does not mention the involved railroad(?)...Whistling  

Looking up the location on Google Earth, I am guessing it is on the NS or some shortline.  It is WNW of Birmingham by about 30 miles.  None of the other locations in the area ring any bells from by CSX exprience in the Birmingham area.

All things considered, can it be much worse than being downwind of a paper plant in the pre EPA days?  Refineries in those days were also rather oderific!

Back in the day, the smells that eminated from a town were considered the smell of money.

         

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Posted by blhanel on Sunday, April 08, 2018 9:21 PM

BaltACD

Back in the day, the smells that eminated from a town were considered the smell of money.

 
They still do around here... (ADM Corn Sweeteners/Cargill/Penford/Quaker).  Include the sewage treatment plant, and you know why they call Cedar Rapids "the city of five smells".
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Posted by tree68 on Sunday, April 08, 2018 10:03 PM

Topo map on Acme Mapper shows it to be former Southern.  With prevailing westerlies, I can see why the ball fields would suffer.

I would presume it's here: N 33 43' 59" W 87 16' 16"

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Deggesty on Monday, April 09, 2018 8:53 PM

Parrish is the junction of the former Northern Alabmaa (Sheffield to Parrish) (which was swalloewd up by the Southern) and the former Georgia Pacific (Atlanta to Greenville, Mississippi)--or, briefly, the former Southern, now Norfolk Southern.

Johnny

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Posted by Deggesty on Monday, April 09, 2018 8:57 PM

No, Wayne, +90 is HOT in Alabama, even in the Tuscaloosa area (I lived in Reform for almost nine years). You should try scoring four ball games in an evening, beginning at 5:00 CST. We had to delay the start by an hour in the summer of 1967.

Johnny

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Posted by ChuckCobleigh on Monday, April 09, 2018 11:06 PM

BaltACD
All things considered, can it be much worse than being downwind of a paper plant in the pre EPA days?  Refineries in those days were also rather odorific!

Hmmm, sounds like Savannah, GA, and Long Beach, CA, respectively, two very pungent venues in the early-mid 70s.

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Posted by ccltrains on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 6:54 AM

I grew up in the northern panhandle of West Virginia.  At that time ('50s) steel manufacturing was big business.  Our house had a dusting of iron ore dust.  Near the blast furnaces the ground was covered with steel related dust with nothing growing.  My father who worked in the mill said that dirt and industry go together.  Now the mills are gone and the population is 50% of what it was when I lived there.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 7:18 AM

Why do so many people consider clean air and water to be bad for business?

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 7:45 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
Why do so many people consider clean air and water to be bad for business?

Because businesses cry about the money they have to spend to attain clean water and air.  Business would rather kill their markets than spend money making their market area livable for those who buy their products.  Businesses use threats against their employees and their jobs as their defense against spending for enviornmental survival.

We can look to China and India as object points of what happens when the enviornment is not respected by business.

         

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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 8:32 AM

BaltACD
We can look to China and India as object points of what happens when the enviornment is not respected by business.

Why go so far?  Been fishing in the Adirondacks lately?

LarryWhistling
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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 9:56 AM

tree68
 
BaltACD
We can look to China and India as object points of what happens when the enviornment is not respected by business. 

Why go so far?  Been fishing in the Adirondacks lately?

Lived near Cleveland when the Cuyahoga River caught on fire!

         

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Posted by zardoz on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 11:44 AM

BaltACD

 

 
tree68
 
BaltACD
We can look to China and India as object points of what happens when the enviornment is not respected by business. 

Why go so far?  Been fishing in the Adirondacks lately?

 

Lived near Cleveland when the Cuyahoga River caught on fire!

 

Lucky for us the current administration is rolling back those pesky environmental laws put in place by the previous administration.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-12/trump-citing-redundancies-again-proposes-steep-cuts-to-epa

 

Ah, progress.

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Posted by ACY Tom on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 12:18 PM

[quote use

zardoz

 

 
BaltACD

 

 
tree68
 
BaltACD
We can look to China and India as object points of what happens when the enviornment is not respected by business. 

Why go so far?  Been fishing in the Adirondacks lately?

 

Lived near Cleveland when the Cuyahoga River caught on fire!

 

 

 

Lucky for us the current administration is rolling back those pesky environmental laws put in place by the previous administration.

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-12/trump-citing-redundancies-again-proposes-steep-cuts-to-epa

 

Ah, progress.

 

 

 
BaltACD

 

 
tree68
 
BaltACD
We can look to China and India as object points of what happens when the enviornment is not respected by business. 

Why go so far?  Been fishing in the Adirondacks lately?

 

Lived near Cleveland when the Cuyahoga River caught on fire!

 

 

 

Lucky for us the current administration is rolling back those pesky environmental laws put in place by the previous administration.

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-12/trump-citing-redundancies-again-proposes-steep-cuts-to-epa

 

Ah, progress.

 

[/quote]

I grew up in Akron, Ohio, and went to high school near the Goodyear plant. If the conditions were just right, you could take a deep breath and vulcanize your lungs.  Often, the aroma of ammonia was almost overpowering. In other towns, pulpwood mills provided (and in some places they still provide) a special ambiance. 

Now that the EPA is being weakened, I wish I had the money to build a big old-fashioned tannery and locate it in a nice place like, say, Palm Beach, upwind of Mar A Lago. 

Tom

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 12:39 PM

ACY Tom
I grew up in Akron, Ohio, and went to high school near the Goodyear plant. If the conditions were just right, you could take a deep breath and vulcanize your lungs.  Often, the aroma of ammonia was almost overpowering. In other towns, pulpwood mills provided (and in some places they still provide) a special ambiance. 

Now that the EPA is being weakened, I wish I had the money to build a big old-fashioned tannery and locate it in a nice place like, say, Palm Beach, upwind of Mar A Lago. 

Tom

Worked the Train Order Operators job at FY Tower in Pittsburgh, tower was bolted to the side of the 33rd Street Bridge across the Allegheny River - before gettting to the North shore of the river some piers were constructed on Herr's Island.  On the island was a major tannery and animal protiens business.  The tannery's outbound hide cars were switched by crews from Willow Grove Yard.  In the pre-EPA days at 6 PM sharp they dumped their 'waste water' directly into the river.  If you had not eaten your lunch prior to 6 PM, and the breeze was from the North - you took it home as it was impossible to eat anything with the stench.

Having live in Akron for 2 1/2 years - I know the aroma of East Akron very well!

         

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 5:09 PM

Deggesty

No, Wayne, +90 is HOT in Alabama, even in the Tuscaloosa area (I lived in Reform for almost nine years). You should try scoring four ball games in an evening, beginning at 5:00 CST. We had to delay the start by an hour in the summer of 1967.

 

As Senator Claghorn used to say, "That's a joke, son!"

Hence my 99 degree cold snap quip!

Wayne

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Posted by SALfan on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 10:37 PM

ChuckCobleigh

 

 
BaltACD
All things considered, can it be much worse than being downwind of a paper plant in the pre EPA days?  Refineries in those days were also rather odorific!

 

Hmmm, sounds like Savannah, GA, and Long Beach, CA, respectively, two very pungent venues in the early-mid 70s.

 

Ever spent any time in Brunswick GA?  When I lived there in 1978-79, there was a paper mill on one side of town and a gunpowder plant on the other.  Because of the sea breeze residents were able to "enjoy" the stench of one in the morning and the other in the afternoon.  You never had to wonder which way the wind was blowing, just breathe  while outside and you would know.  Side benefit: the chemicals condensing out of the emissions of one of them  (I think the paper mill) would eat the paint off cars parked there, so all the employees had old beaters to drive to work. 

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Posted by ccltrains on Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:06 AM

So we have a train full of New York's waste.  Guess NIMBY works well there.  Send all of our unwanted you know what some where else.  Now we have a very smelly line of rail cars sitting on a siding.  Are they covered hoppers or what?  Being the vice president of our water company i know a little about sewerage.  As it degrades by anaerobic action methane gas is produced.  Methane will burn but from my brief earlier life working as a mining engineer we had the 5-15% rule.  Methane is explosive between 5.13 and 14.97% concentration in air, hence the 5-15 rule.  Above and below these points it will burn.  If things turn bad we could have an explosion bigger than the West Texas explosion a few years ago.  If I lived there I would have a couple locomotives coupled to the poo poo cars and send it back to New York City.

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Posted by zugmann on Thursday, April 19, 2018 9:37 AM

ccltrains
If I lived there I would have a couple locomotives coupled to the poo poo cars and send it back to New York City.

Dont' blame NYC for an alabama company for taking the stuff.

 The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by Eddie Sand on Thursday, April 19, 2018 10:49 AM

The same stuff that rolls downhill also tends to stick together; out-of-town politicians and railroad companies (which are increasingly detached from a  feminized, over-sensitized and technophobic electorate) are an easy target for the short-sighted "swing voters" and the short-sighted political hacks who pander to them. The great deceptive game will continue until it breaks down completely, and those of us who see a wider picture, who still hold to some belief in the American Experiment, and still try to play by the rules will be the biggest losers.

19 and copy from 'NP' at Nescopeck, Penna.
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Posted by LithoniaOperator on Thursday, April 19, 2018 12:55 PM

$#it happens.

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