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Baldwin DT-6-6-2000

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Baldwin DT-6-6-2000
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 1:24 PM
I found a site that says you can use 2 Stewart AS-6-1-6 (?) models to make a DT-6-6-2000. That is interesting, but how? Is that all there is to it?[B)] I have seen some photos and it loos like a extended E7[?][?][?][?] frame.
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Baldwin DT-6-6-2000
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 1:24 PM
I found a site that says you can use 2 Stewart AS-6-1-6 (?) models to make a DT-6-6-2000. That is interesting, but how? Is that all there is to it?[B)] I have seen some photos and it loos like a extended E7[?][?][?][?] frame.
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 10:11 PM
Please. Where is that site?????
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 10:11 PM
Please. Where is that site?????
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, July 31, 2003 9:25 AM
The site is http://www.starnet.com.au/soors27/mns/mnslocoroster.htm [:)]
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, July 31, 2003 9:25 AM
The site is http://www.starnet.com.au/soors27/mns/mnslocoroster.htm [:)]
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, July 31, 2003 10:19 PM
I checked out my Baldwin book today and it does appear that a very credible model of the DT-6-6-2000 can be built from two AS616's. I might just try it someday very soon.[8D][8D][8D][8D][:p]
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, July 31, 2003 10:19 PM
I checked out my Baldwin book today and it does appear that a very credible model of the DT-6-6-2000 can be built from two AS616's. I might just try it someday very soon.[8D][8D][8D][8D][:p]
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 8:56 AM
Do you know of anyone who has done such a kitbash? What else did they use other than the shells? [?][?][^]
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 8:56 AM
Do you know of anyone who has done such a kitbash? What else did they use other than the shells? [?][?][^]
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 1:14 PM
Don't know of anyone but I was looking at book again this AM, this is going to be a formidable project for anyone, whether it be thier first or one of many, however, I don't think the shell is going to be that hard to come up with. The real work is going to be in the frame. Thats going to have to be fabricated by cutting up some frame stock and bashing it from scratch, not hard, just time consuming and very precise. If you have skills along these lines, you shouldn't have any real problems. Let me know how it turns out. I would like to try this one myself.[:)][:)][:)]
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 1:14 PM
Don't know of anyone but I was looking at book again this AM, this is going to be a formidable project for anyone, whether it be thier first or one of many, however, I don't think the shell is going to be that hard to come up with. The real work is going to be in the frame. Thats going to have to be fabricated by cutting up some frame stock and bashing it from scratch, not hard, just time consuming and very precise. If you have skills along these lines, you shouldn't have any real problems. Let me know how it turns out. I would like to try this one myself.[:)][:)][:)]
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 2, 2003 1:11 PM
If it's practical for you to do so, you might want to come out to the Illinois Railroaad Museum in Union, IL [Mc Henry County] and look at a real one and maybe the diesel department people might let you make measurements.

It really helps to make models more realistic when you can look at the prototype in detail.

Rich Witt
Arlington Heights, IL
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 2, 2003 1:11 PM
If it's practical for you to do so, you might want to come out to the Illinois Railroaad Museum in Union, IL [Mc Henry County] and look at a real one and maybe the diesel department people might let you make measurements.

It really helps to make models more realistic when you can look at the prototype in detail.

Rich Witt
Arlington Heights, IL
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 10:42 AM
It's not all that easy to do, but I've done it. It involves a lot of cutting and splicing. The hood ends have to be cut in the middle and angled outward 9 inches, which means you have to add material to the ends to make them wider. The hood also needs to be raised about 9-10 inches with strips at the bottom. You'll see this part on MN&S #21 at Illinois Railway Museum. It's the black area on the hoods above the walkway.

I'm making two for Bill Bedle at Greenfield News & Hobby. One is nearly completed, only needing the steps around the cab, couplers, hand rails, and paint & decals. Once it's complete I'll be pouring a mold and making shells from Smooth-On, and once I can afford some again, Alumilite. I've used both and prefer Alumilite and Dow-Corning rubber.

I fabricated the frame out of K&S 1/4" by .062" (1/16") bar stock. The most difficult part is the fuel tank/motor mount, but the the new motor mounts it's a lot simpler. I made the prototype model from a 10-year-old AS-16 motor with the metal weight still attached. The new ones don't have that.

I don't remember the exact measurements, but I'm working with a frame length of either 69'3" or 69'9" between the steps. I'm planning to be ready to roll with this inside of 2 weeks. E-mail me if you're interested. jcunington@aol.com Otherwise, I'll provide all the help to you I can.

These things seems to come in two flavors. There are some air intake filters located near the ends of the hoods on both sides. Some versions have the screens mounted at the bottom of the hood and some have them mounted higher. The EJ&E had both. MN&S #21 is a low-mount. Refer to photos of your prototype if you're a rivet counter.

Good luck should you decide to build.

Jay
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 10:42 AM
It's not all that easy to do, but I've done it. It involves a lot of cutting and splicing. The hood ends have to be cut in the middle and angled outward 9 inches, which means you have to add material to the ends to make them wider. The hood also needs to be raised about 9-10 inches with strips at the bottom. You'll see this part on MN&S #21 at Illinois Railway Museum. It's the black area on the hoods above the walkway.

I'm making two for Bill Bedle at Greenfield News & Hobby. One is nearly completed, only needing the steps around the cab, couplers, hand rails, and paint & decals. Once it's complete I'll be pouring a mold and making shells from Smooth-On, and once I can afford some again, Alumilite. I've used both and prefer Alumilite and Dow-Corning rubber.

I fabricated the frame out of K&S 1/4" by .062" (1/16") bar stock. The most difficult part is the fuel tank/motor mount, but the the new motor mounts it's a lot simpler. I made the prototype model from a 10-year-old AS-16 motor with the metal weight still attached. The new ones don't have that.

I don't remember the exact measurements, but I'm working with a frame length of either 69'3" or 69'9" between the steps. I'm planning to be ready to roll with this inside of 2 weeks. E-mail me if you're interested. jcunington@aol.com Otherwise, I'll provide all the help to you I can.

These things seems to come in two flavors. There are some air intake filters located near the ends of the hoods on both sides. Some versions have the screens mounted at the bottom of the hood and some have them mounted higher. The EJ&E had both. MN&S #21 is a low-mount. Refer to photos of your prototype if you're a rivet counter.

Good luck should you decide to build.

Jay
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 10:51 AM
I found dimensioned drawings here:
http://members.cland.net/~ksclement/dt662kmd.jpg
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 10:51 AM
I found dimensioned drawings here:
http://members.cland.net/~ksclement/dt662kmd.jpg
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 11:06 AM
There is an EJ&E version available in brass at modeltrains.com...for $711 available in December 2003.
  • Member since
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  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 11:06 AM
There is an EJ&E version available in brass at modeltrains.com...for $711 available in December 2003.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 1, 2003 12:13 AM
I saw one of the 'Big Baldwins' in HO-scale at a train show in Altoona 6+ years ago. Didn't find out who owned it, but it looked very nice.....
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 1, 2003 12:13 AM
I saw one of the 'Big Baldwins' in HO-scale at a train show in Altoona 6+ years ago. Didn't find out who owned it, but it looked very nice.....

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