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Starting over

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  • Member since
    November, 2017
  • 13 posts
Starting over
Posted by conrail0721 on Thursday, June 28, 2018 7:58 PM

I have just become semi retired.  Due to two strokes in 3 months. Likely no disabling effects other then some fine detail vision loss on my left side.  So I have a two car garage with a single door, I get to use two walls for the layout so it will be basically  a l shaped  shelf the walls r drywall already, I don't trust the builder for making the studs 16 inches on center. So I planned to get some 2x2 ripped in half to be the new supporting studs held in place with lag screws and adhesive.  Then build an open grid layout with the remaining  ripped 2x2 for legs in key  spots putting dry wall up for the back drop. This might be overkill but I know where the studs r and can drill out holes for power and keep off the floor to prevent  water damage during the heavy rains we have here . Your thoughts?

  • Member since
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  • 807 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, June 29, 2018 8:15 AM

Don't know that I totally understand your posting.

Are you going to make 'additional studding' out of ripped 2x2 on 16" centers,...additional to what studs are already in the garage??

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 2,376 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, June 29, 2018 8:18 AM

Could you post a drawing? I don't quite understand what you mean.

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It sounds like you are adding a wall over the wall.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
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  • 807 posts
Posted by railandsail on Friday, June 29, 2018 8:28 AM

Alternative you might consider,...

With a stud finder tool you might just locate the 2x4 studs already there behind your existing drywall. Then instead of making shelf support brackets for each stud, stretch a piece of angle iron horizontally across the wall attached to the studs ( I'm using a combination of sign-post square metal tubing and good strong bed-frame L-shaped framing I find at old surplius stores).

Then cantilever your plywood shelves out from these strong horizontal metal frameworks, with perhaps only an occassional vertical support member.

  • Member since
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  • From: Northern Virginia
  • 5,583 posts
Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, June 29, 2018 8:33 AM

Brian, it does sound like the OP knows where the studs are according to his information provided (I bolded below).

conrail0721
I get to use two walls for the layout

so it will be basically  a l shaped  shelf

the walls r drywall already

I don't trust the builder for making the studs 16 inches on center. So I planned to get some 2x2 ripped in half to be the new supporting studs held in place with lag screws and adhesive.  Then build an open grid layout with the remaining  ripped 2x2 for legs in key  spots putting dry wall up for the back drop. This might be overkill but I know where the studs r and can drill out holes for power and keep off the floor to prevent  water damage during the heavy rains we have here . Your thoughts?

The layout is I shaped?  or did you mean L shaped along two of the walls, which have drywall installed already.

My question is why do you need to rip 2x4's down to 2x2 for support for the shelf layout?

It sounds like you know where the studs are (stud finder) as you mentioned so you can mount shelf supports to the studs behind the drywall, which should be totally sufficient for supporting the shelf layout?

Yes, it seems like overkill and unnecessary to me.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

PED
  • Member since
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  • 340 posts
Posted by PED on Friday, June 29, 2018 9:15 AM

Having water come onto the floor does not sound good even if you can keep all the electrical up high. You might consider a low dam across the doorways to at least keep the water out. You can build a concrete dam sorta like the speed bumps in the street so you can drive over it.

Paul

Washita and Santa Fe Railroad
Circa 1970's in south central Oklahoma

  • Member since
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  • From: Northern Virginia
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Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, June 29, 2018 9:30 AM

PED

Having water come onto the floor does not sound good even if you can keep all the electrical up high. You might consider a low dam across the doorways to at least keep the water out. You can build a concrete dam sorta like the speed bumps in the street so you can drive over it.

I agree.  Water on the floor means you will have humidity problems in the room which could tranlate into problems with the layout, like expansion/contraction problems that may play havoc with the track kinking etc.

Best thing if possible, is to control the envoronment as much as possible to limit the temp and humidity extremes.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

  • Member since
    November, 2017
  • 13 posts
Posted by conrail0721 on Friday, June 29, 2018 11:08 AM

Yes L shape I had do this before  because my foundation  at my last house was old and not true.. I retook at the walls today I missed the baseboard  they have at the bottom of the drywall.. so I may have additional  marking for studs their already.. the other reason for the double wall as they say was in the event I move again I can put up wooden shelves  which is plus for storage down here. I don't get water in other then by the garage  main overhead door. It been pretty dry considering  some of the storms we get in Arkansas.. 

  • Member since
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Posted by conrail0721 on Friday, June 29, 2018 12:33 PM

Yes 

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