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Building a new club layout (and other club related activities)

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  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 25,367 posts
Posted by rrinker on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 1:17 PM

 I applied ballast to adjacent sections on my old layout (built on cork roadbed on pink foam board), one side using white glue, the other using matte medium. I diluted the white glue with 70% alcohol, because I've NEVER had the drop of soap in water thing work, we have very hard water around here.

 Once it all dried, there was no difference in appearance and no difference in sound as locos and cars moved from one part ot the other. The only difference is that the matte medium cost a lot more. PVA white glue (Elmer's) seems to dry somewhat rubbery when mixed with alcohol instead of just diluted with water.

                                   --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 4,451 posts
Posted by rrebell on Tuesday, January 08, 2019 1:31 PM

railandsail

So you are saying to use matt medium to attach ballast,...in all cases?

 

I do, but others like other things, however if something is going to be moved, then the others for the most part are unacceptable like PVA as they get brittle with age, ask any woodworker.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 9,169 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 1:37 AM

Hi guys,

Thanks for all the input. Lots to think about.

I think that we have discovered why the foamcore was warping. When we lifted a couple of sections up we realized that there had been very little glue used to hold the pieces down. Whoever installed it only put a couple of lines of glue down the middle of the foamcore pieces with nothing applied to the outer edges. Then they painted the foamcore on the top only. We believe that the combination of lack of adhesion and the shrinkage of the paint caused the foamcore to warp. In any case, regardless of the cause of the warpage, we are going to replace the foamcore with 1/4" baltic birch plywood, and we are going to glue every square inch of it down so that hopefully it won't warp.

We actually made a lot of progress on the portable layout on Tuesday night. We ripped out several areas where things were coming loose, and we removed almost all of the dust that had accumulated over the years. I personally took great pleasure in removing some sphagnum moss from the tunnel mountain that looked deader than you could imagine. Fortunately it wasn't glued down. It still had the original dirt attached to the roots.

We also decided to do away with a live waterfall that used real water. When it worked it looked sort of okay, but if you didn't keep a constant eye on it the water would leak or evaporate, and if the pump went dry there was a risk of the pump going up in smoke. It also made putting that part of the layout together a real PITA. We can do a much more convincing waterfall with silicone and modge podge.

Sorry, I forgot to take my camera so we won't have a record of the 'before' layout.

Dave

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 25,367 posts
Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 7:15 AM

 Live water almost never works on a model anyway. Physics doesn;t scale, so the ripples and motion of the water just look 'wrong' in relation to the size of the trains and other identifiable items on the layout. And having something wet just encourages mold and mildew formation.

                            --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 4,451 posts
Posted by rrebell on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 8:57 AM

Remember only one layout where real water worked, they accually had a boat running on rails beneath the water to a dock. Even the owner said it was a pain to maintain as I recall, but it did work.

  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 25,367 posts
Posted by rrinker on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 9:01 AM

 There's a more recent one where the boats are actualy radio controlled so you can have crew positions that drive boats instead of trains, but I know of the one that you are referring to. That had to be a HUGE pain to maintain, not only because of the water, but to incorporate the mechanism that moved the boats which had to either work submerged or work through the base while being leak proof. Today I could see a mechanism that used magnets to couple a moving arm located below the layout to the boat int he water on top, but I think this one was fully mechanical.

                                    --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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