Melbourne Tram

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Melbourne Tram
Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 4:23 PM

 After my last post, it occurred to me some people may not be familiar with a "Melbourne Tram"

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 4:32 PM

So, I dug out my pictures from my trip in '80, 1 month of which was in Melbourne. They had an extensive street railway system, and the cars are called "trams". These wooden 1920's vintage trams went everywhere. A man would come down the aisle and would make change for your fare, depending on the distance. He had a belt with several cylinders of coins to make change.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 4:38 PM

 When I went back in '82, most of these trams had been replaced with newer equipment. Fortunately, one tram runs in San Francisco. This picture shows the Flinders Street Station in Melbourne.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 4:42 PM

 From Flinders, you can get a train out to Belgrade, to see the " Puffing Billy ".

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 4:51 PM

This 30 inch gauge line operates in the Dandenong range outside Melbourne. These 2-6-2 outside frame tanks look very Baldwin, but be careful! The first 2 were Baldwins, with 15 more built in the Victorian Railway's Newport shops . Also, Australian practice is for cream, or beige cab interiors, instead of green, which is North American standards.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 4:56 PM

 Queensland, on the north east side of Australia, is very tropical. Cane fields a plenty ! In steam days, they used British makes, such as Hunslet.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 4:59 PM

 Now using internal combustion, side rod engines.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 5:02 PM

 Notice they also refer to these as " tram". Most of the time the tracks sit dormant, unless you are lucky enough to be there in harvest season.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 5:06 PM

 On a side trip to New Zealand, our coach driver was kind enough to stop.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 5:10 PM

 It was November '82, and the lorries were bringing in the "Kingston Flyer" for the summer season. ( remember summer peaks in January)

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 5:15 PM

New Zealand Government Railways are 3'6", which is a British Colonial g auge. Used in South Africa, Queensland, even Japan( all systems except the Shinkansen).

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 5:18 PM

Every body now !

" All together now"

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Posted by Penny Trains on Friday, October 20, 2017 6:30 PM

Great pics!  Ever since I saw/taped "Australia By Rail" on PBS a few years back I've been more respectful of the railways down under.  I'm not saying I'd want to camel train it down the old Gahn line the way Scott MacGreggor did on the show, but I'd certainly love to ride the Pitchey Ritchey, Barossa Valley Wine Train and of course the Indian Pacific.

Funny you should mention trams!  I saw one this morning on NHK Newsline that caught my eye:

It's called the Botchan Ressha and it's a diesel replica of this train:

It runs in Matsuyama Japan in regular tram service: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botchan_Ressha  We need operations like this!  Big Smile

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 6:58 PM

Wow ! 

Maybe next time I get to Japan. My wife's family always works something train related into our itinerary. ( how did they know ?)

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Friday, October 20, 2017 7:05 PM

Also, that " Pichi Richi"

looks peachey !

( couldn't resist)

I think I forgot to mention: the fare person on the Melbourne Tram would not only give change, but had a box with shoulder straps, and would then crank out a ticket with the fare on it. This was like a receipt.

Also, Puffing Billy was the first time I smelled coal smoke. Before the Durango and Silverton, and Cumbres and Toltec, there was Puffing Billy.

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Posted by lionelsoni on Saturday, October 21, 2017 9:06 AM

The gauge of the San Francisco cable cars is also 3'6.  This gauge is often called "Cape gauge."

Bob Nelson

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 21, 2017 9:31 AM

lionelsoni

The gauge of the San Francisco cable cars is also 3'6.  This gauge is often called "Cape gauge."

 

The Newfoundland Railway was also built to the "Cape Gauge."  It was cheaper that way, but it hurt them in the long run.  Another story.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Saturday, October 21, 2017 12:02 PM

It's amazing how common this gauge was, and in so many different countries.In Australia alone, this was the gauge in Western Australia, and Queensland, with New South Wales being standard gauge, and Victoria being " Irish Gauge" (5'3").

Not to mention that this is a very common gauge for street Railways, like Los Angeles Railways " yellow cars".

Pacific Electric had " red cars", and standard gauge.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Saturday, October 21, 2017 1:21 PM

Here's a little tidbit, if you're interested:

as I mentioned, I took the trams everywhere in Melbourne. I even went to a train show in some distant, outlying suburb. In downtown Melbourne there were at least 2 hobby shops that were selling Astor live steam engines in gauge 1, for about $1,200 Australian. I had the cash in pocket, but I would have to cut my trip short. I chose the trip.

So, that's another example of the things that slip through our fingers. The Lionel 2035 has slipped through my fingers 3 times, and the GG1 twice !

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 21, 2017 3:07 PM

Oh yeah, things we should have bought, but didn't.  I haven't missed out on any trains yet, but thirty years ago I was at a gun show and a bookseller there had a copy of General John J. Pershing's "My Experiences In The World War" and autographed by the general.  He wanted $50 for the two-volume set, and I passed on it!  I've been kicking myself ever since!  WHAT was I thinking?

I wasn't thinking, that was the problem!

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Saturday, October 21, 2017 3:50 PM

You know the story :

if you hesitate and come back later, it's gone !

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 21, 2017 4:00 PM

I was certainly gone by the next show I went to!  Groan.....

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, October 21, 2017 5:50 PM

Postwar Paul
The Lionel 2035 has slipped through my fingers 3 times

Since I got mine last summer (2016) I've had a hard time letting anything else use the rails!

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 21, 2017 6:02 PM

Penny Trains
 
Postwar Paul
The Lionel 2035 has slipped through my fingers 3 times

 

Since I got mine last summer (2016) I've had a hard time letting anything else use the rails!

 

Jeez, if they're that good I'll have to get one too!  I've seen 'em, they're around...

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Saturday, October 21, 2017 6:29 PM

They're beautiful, beefy engines. I've got 2 2025's, both have aluminum stacks. Me thinks that be '47 production. Very smooth runners. I am just imagining a 2035, with all that weight, And Magnetraction! 

All things considered, I feel fortunate, and have everything I need. 

But if a 2035 were to pass my way again, I can't be responsible for what happens !

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Posted by lionelsoni on Saturday, October 21, 2017 6:56 PM

Why would the cars of the Diesel-powered "Botchan Ressha" train be equipped with bow collectors?

Bob Nelson

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Saturday, October 21, 2017 7:20 PM

That's a great question.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Saturday, October 21, 2017 7:24 PM

I need to read that link again, but I think they said those tram cars sometimes run without the engine. Correct me if I'm wrong..

It looks like there was a time before 2001, when the diesel arrived, they were running without it. Near as I can decipher...

 

I was wondering about that myself.

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Posted by Postwar Paul on Saturday, October 21, 2017 10:22 PM

Isn't funny how you can travel the world over, and people like the same things ? Japan, Australia, doesn't matter. Still see hobby shops, train museums,and train shows.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, October 22, 2017 9:40 AM

Postwar Paul

Isn't funny how you can travel the world over, and people like the same things ? Japan, Australia, doesn't matter. Still see hobby shops, train museums,and train shows.

 

Love of trains, and especially steam engines, seems to be universal.  I was shocked several months ago to read there's a steam locomotive restoration under way in VietNam!  Both for the tourist trade and for the love of steam.  Amazing.

Maybe the key to world peace is in steam locomotives and toy trains?

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