Troy NY Union Station

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Troy NY Union Station

  • The map in the Feb 2013 Trains magazine shows the B&M's Troy Branch, and Troy Union Station, as abandoned in 1959.  I'm pretty sure Rutland trains (enroute to Chatham NY) went through here on trackage rights until at least 1963, and my B&M emloyee timetable from Jan 1964 shows the Troy branch.  And even though I can't find the magazine, I'm pretty sure I remember a photo of a Penn Central train parting the weeds at the site of the former Union Station.  Anyone have a real date for abandonment?

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  • The Rutland to went to Chatham on it's own line from Bennington and interchanged its with the NYC's Harlem DIvision  there.  I don't believe it ran its own trains to  Troy but may have had the B&M carry its  cars.  Troy Union Station was B&M, NYC and D&H.

    RIDEWITHMEHENRY will plan and escort railfan rides in and around the NY Metropolitan and Philadephia areas: no mode of transportation is untouched. Guaranteed railfan fun!

  • After the 1953 abandonment of Rutland's own line from Bennington to Chatham the Rutland operated a more-or-less daily through freight over B&M and NYC/B&A trackage rights from Rutland to Chatham via North Bennington, Hoosick Jct., Troy, and Renssalaer.  Jim Shoughnessy's book has photos of Rutland RS3's operating there.  Prior to 1953 Rutland passenger engines often operated to Troy, as B&M's did to Rutland.

  • Henry, all major Rutland passenger trains ran over the B&M to Troy and not to Chatham.   Only the daily middle of the night milk train ran to Chatham and it did carry passengers.   At Chatham the baggage0car milk cars went both to New York via the Harlem Div and to Boston via the B&A.   But the main line passenger trains went to Troy and then to New York on the NYC.    At the time some D&H passenger trains also ran via Troy and not via Albany.   This included the Laurentia, which was combined with the Green Mountain on the NYC to and from NYCity.

    Possibly the station building was abandoned in 1959 and replaced by a "shelter?"

  • Are you sure the through milk trains to Chatham carried passengers?From Shaughnessy's book,I get the impression that NO passengers were carried on the Chatham branch since the late 20's or early 30's(I'm in the library now and don't have the book handy).I believe a mixed train ran between Chatham and Bennington and then was replaced by a bus operated by the Rutland,but even this ended circa 1931.

          Also,I understand that North Bennington was the stop on the Troy-Montreal route,not Bennington to the south.If Mr.Shaughessy himself posts here,he can verify this,he actually witnessed these operations,wheras I arrived in the world and in Vermont a bit too late!

  • Chatham Branch did not go through Troy....but milk trains did carry passengers to GCT...but I don't know how late this was still occurring.  

    RIDEWITHMEHENRY will plan and escort railfan rides in and around the NY Metropolitan and Philadephia areas: no mode of transportation is untouched. Guaranteed railfan fun!

  • I know that Troy is not on the Bennington-Chatham route;I lived in Bennington,VT from age 10 in 1962 until I went off to seminary in 1972.Are you saying that the milk trains,which originated in Ogdensburg,NY,then traveled through to the Rutland main line through Vermont,and then the Chatham branch to Chatham,NY,were a type of mixed train?

         I think if that were the case,Mr.Shaughnessy would have had something to say about that in his book.My reference to Troy was regarding passenger service on the Rutland which ended in 1953.Up to then,Rutland operated passenger trains to Troy,NY.At North Bennington,the rains operated over B&M trackage until Troy.In later years,before passenger service ended,the trains would go no further north than Burlington,VT

  • You sent me to Grogan's The Coming of the New York and Harlem Railroad.  All references in pictures in the book show milk cars and caboose and no rider car or passenger coach for the Rutland mil,...on the Harlem line anyway.  Usually milk trains were considered First Class trains for timetable authority and on most roads it meant carrying passengers, too.  These trains were carded as First Class and not at Mixed Trains nor 3rd Class.  So, next I will have to check through some timetables and OG's; unfortunately there are non reproduced in the book.  It brings up a question about whether or not Harlem milk trains carried passengers or not.

    RIDEWITHMEHENRY will plan and escort railfan rides in and around the NY Metropolitan and Philadephia areas: no mode of transportation is untouched. Guaranteed railfan fun!

  • Possibly the few passengers on the train on the Rutland were carried in the caboose, and the NYC Harlem line connection may have had a combine or passenger coach.

    But the main passenger route was definitely over the B&M to a Troy connection with the Central.

  • If there were passengers on the Rut/Harlem train, being First Class, it would appear in the public timetable which it wasn't from what I can see.  And since milk trains didn't go to GCT, there was less likelyhood of them carrying passengers.

    RIDEWITHMEHENRY will plan and escort railfan rides in and around the NY Metropolitan and Philadephia areas: no mode of transportation is untouched. Guaranteed railfan fun!

  • The milk trains on the Harlem ran around the wye at Mott Haven, then the second wye at Spuyten Dyvil, and down the West Side line .  There was a Bordens Milk processing plant that had a siding off the West Side Line, and I remember visiting it with a my grade school class.   However, there were cases of passengers being carried on head-end trains including some not in the public timetable .  The Harlem Div. train probably had a rider coach or combine .  Also, remember that during part of the 1930's, there was still two morning Spuyten Dyvil - 60th St local trains with two return in the evening.  I believe they used the same coaches as the Putnam Div trains and operated out of High Bridge yard.   They may have been mu cars or mu trailers but did have lighting and heating from the output of the oil-electric locos that powered  them.   A time table chekc would show if they ran south of 60th to the Post Office yard at 32nd St.

  • Pics in the Harlem book show only cabooses and no rider cars on mile trains.  I suspected they went west on the wye at Mott Haven and down the West Side.

    RIDEWITHMEHENRY will plan and escort railfan rides in and around the NY Metropolitan and Philadephia areas: no mode of transportation is untouched. Guaranteed railfan fun!

  • So..  The successors to the milk trains, RC-3 and CR-4, definitely ran over B&M/NYC/B&A trackage rights from North Bennington to Chatham via Troy and Renssalaer after the Chatham branch ("corkscrew") was abandoned in 1953.  The Rutland was abandoned in 1963 and B&M still listed the Troy Branch in the Jan. 1 1964 employee timetable.  When was the B&M branch abandoned south of Johnsonville?

  • If they went to Troy, the didn't go to Chatham but on down the Hudson Line to NYC's West Side.  Not sure when Johnsonville to Troy was abandoned but you can still find the tower there and if you look carefully you can follow the abandoned ROW into Troy. When the snow melts and before the leaves or in Sept after the leaves fall and before the snow, are two great times to go hunting for abandoned rights of ways...or even those which are extant.

    RIDEWITHMEHENRY will plan and escort railfan rides in and around the NY Metropolitan and Philadephia areas: no mode of transportation is untouched. Guaranteed railfan fun!

  •  The milk train was an exception and ran to Chatham via trackage rights on the B&M to Troy and the B&A-NYC from Troy to Chatham.   This was discussed in a past CT article.   I suspect by that time there were zero passengers.   But when the "Corkscrew" line was still running, with the milk train bypassing Tory and running on Rutland tracks directly to Chatham, there almost certainly were passengers . Possibly at Chatham they changed to one of the regular Chatham - GCT passenger trains run by the Central.   It would have been logical if they want to go say from Rutland to White Plains, or Brwester, or Valhalla, or Chappauqua, etc.

    The Rutland apparently still had one or two customers in Chatham even after abandoning direct service.   Similar to what CP (D&H) does now in Albany via trackage rights on CSX!