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Locomotive auto start features.

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  • Member since
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  • From: Georgia USA SW of Atlanta
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Locomotive auto start features.
Posted by blue streak 1 on Wednesday, June 8, 2022 7:00 PM

CSX has parked on our siding a triple separated ballast train for 3 days here.  There are 4 CW-44ACs connected to only three ballast cars.  The first unit CSX 61 and third unit CSX 67 have random times that they idle or are shut off.  61 idles at a faster RPM than 67.  Cannot figure why they idle so much which appears about 30 minutes on and 30 off but not in sync.  Not sure about units 2 and 4.

Does not seem to be for air pumping as spitters only go off every 10 - 15 minutes when ideling.  Thought that auto start was only when OAT temps below 40F and cooling water gets to near freezing.?  Temp here is about 80F.

EDIT: Just went by consist again.  Unit 4  CSX 324 started up .  Could hear air compressor run about for 20 seconds and off about 3 minutes. 324 sounded like cylinder was not firing.  Second unit CSX 212 still seems always off.  Note all 4 units have all MU cables, brake hose, and 3 loco control hoses hooked up. 67 started up just before left consist.

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, June 8, 2022 10:41 PM

How the mighty have fallen.  When new, in the late 1990's, those engines were the creme de la creme of CSX locomotives - now they are in MofW service, the bottom ranking service of the railroad hierarchy,  The next level of 'service' after MofW is the Dead Line and then movement to the scrappers.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by zugmann on Thursday, June 9, 2022 12:30 PM

blue streak 1
Does not seem to be for air pumping as spitters only go off every 10 - 15 minutes when ideling.  Thought that auto start was only when OAT temps below 40F and cooling water gets to near freezing.?  Temp here is about 80F.

Could be pumping up the air when the main reservoir dips too low, or charging the batteries if the voltage is below where it should be, or another one of the multitudes of things autostart monitors. 

  

The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of

my employer, any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Friday, June 10, 2022 2:50 AM

BaltACD
How the mighty have fallen.  When new, in the late 1990's, those engines were the creme de la creme of CSX locomotives - now they are in MofW service, the bottom ranking service of the railroad hierarchy,  The next level of 'service' after MofW is the Dead Line and then movement to the scrappers.

Well, they are about a quarter century old and the common wisdom is a locomotive's life is 15 years before it needs to be replaced or rebuilt (which not so coincidently is the length of an equipment trust)

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

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Posted by zugmann on Friday, June 10, 2022 2:09 PM

MOW here jsut gets whatever is ready to go. Don't see the older engines assigned to work service as years past (most of those engines are now razor blades).

  

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my employer, any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by Leo_Ames on Friday, June 10, 2022 2:18 PM

CSX is rebuilding their AC4400CW's, so these may have a long life yet. All of them are well past the 15 year retirement age associated with EMD F units, GE U-Boats, etc. Some are rapidly closing in on their 30th birthday and after renewal could see another 15-20 years of service.

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, June 10, 2022 5:03 PM

zugmann
MOW here jsut gets whatever is ready to go. Don't see the older engines assigned to work service as years past (most of those engines are now razor blades).

In the 1990's CSX took to assigning, mostly GE 4 axles, to MofW service.  The were all painted orange and locally they were referred to as 'Pumpkins'.  I believe the Trains 'All American' diesel, EMD GP38 number 3802 ended up at the B&O Museum in orange. 

 

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Saturday, June 11, 2022 9:52 AM

The pumpkins were primarily U18B's, U23B's, GP38's and GP40's and numbered in the 9500, 9600 and 9700 series.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul

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