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Steam Loco Anatomy

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Steam Loco Anatomy
Posted by jguess733 on Sunday, May 27, 2007 10:20 PM
I have a question about the name, and function of a particular piece of equipment on a steam locomotive. In the photo that the link takes you to it is right behind the headlight and it is shooting out steam. Thank you for the help. http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=176329

Jason

Modeling the Fort Worth & Denver of the early 1970's in N scale

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Posted by jimrice4449 on Monday, May 28, 2007 12:18 AM
It's a steam powered electrical generator
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Posted by KCSfan on Monday, May 28, 2007 5:48 AM

Jim is correct. It is a turbo generator which provides electrical power for the headlight, markers and cab lights.

Mark

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Posted by cprted on Monday, May 28, 2007 12:39 PM
Sometimes you see the steam exhaust from the air pumps in this location. In this picture you can see the tiny wisp of white steam coming in front of the stack is from the air pumps. The other steam rising from the locomotive near the cab is from the turbo generator.
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Posted by TomDiehl on Monday, June 4, 2007 9:44 AM

 cprted wrote:
Sometimes you see the steam exhaust from the air pumps in this location. In this picture you can see the tiny wisp of white steam coming in front of the stack is from the air pumps. The other steam rising from the locomotive near the cab is from the turbo generator.

The steam exhaust from the air pumps normally goes up through the stack, the same as the exhaust from the cylinders. The little steam trail you see on the photo wouldn't be enough to be coming out of the air pump, it's more likely the exhaust from the automatic lubricator.

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