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Thomas Was "Bloody Useless"

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Thomas Was "Bloody Useless"
Posted by BEAUSABRE on Thursday, June 23, 2022 6:21 PM

The truth comes out at last!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oexLRV2m_z0&t=6s

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, June 23, 2022 6:49 PM

Well THAT just made my day!  I'm CRUSHED!  Crying

Next you'll be telling us there's no Easter Bunny...

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, June 23, 2022 7:18 PM

There is also this...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2ul4EBfWMA

Note the video maker's view of on line fora....

Peter

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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, June 23, 2022 9:08 PM

I guess that's why they were confined to the asyl....I mean....island...of Sodor!  Smile, Wink & Grin

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, June 23, 2022 11:02 PM

M636C
There is also this...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2ul4EBfWMA

Note the video maker's view of on line fora....

Peter

Thomas trying to punch above his tonnage rating and beyond his range.

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Posted by jeffhergert on Thursday, June 23, 2022 11:06 PM

I liked one comment where the person said they were so useless that some lasted over 60 years.

Jeff

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Posted by Enzoamps on Friday, June 24, 2022 3:54 AM

Well, I am useless, and I have lasted 75 years so far.

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, June 24, 2022 10:06 AM

Solomon's reference discusses in some detail why the locomotives lasted nearly sixty years.  It sure wasn't fitness, even to intended purpose.

There is a similar range constraint in the PRR V1s, which promised to move wartime trains at considerable speed... about a hundred miles before draining the largest cistern PRR could field.

What I can't figure out is the oscillations.  Britain didn't want for long-wheelbase 0-6-0s happily capable of 60mph, and in push-pull service to boot.

Note also that in the era these were being built, PRR was getting high-30s-mile range from more capable locomotives WITHOUT FIRING in the interim... one wonders if a proper boiler design would have let that 3T bunker and 5000 gallons do Really Useful Work...

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, June 24, 2022 10:15 AM

Solmon's reference discusses in some detail why the locomotives lasted nearly sixty years.  It sure wasn't fitness, even to intended purpose.

There is a similar range constraint in the PRR V1s, which promised to move wartime trains at considerable speed... about a hundred miles before draining the largest cistern PRR could field.

What I can't figure out is the oscillations.  Britain didn't want for long-wheelbase 0-6-0s happily capable of 60mph, and in push-pull service to boot.

Note also that in the era these were being built, PRR was getting high-30s-mile range from more capable locomotives WITHOUT FIRING in the interim... one wonders if a proper boiler design would have let that 3T bunker and 5000 gallons do Really Useful Work...

I think someone needs to get to the root of the base canard inherent in Billinton's middle name, which I think has been a but... I mean bit imaginatively respelled.  It ought to be the Polish spelling of 'Boskovski' -- the 'butz' and 'kopf' don't fit the likely etymology, and for those who know even fractured German the result is, dare I say, unfortunate...

I am morally opposed to making fun of the person who did the Remembrance tanks.

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, June 24, 2022 5:47 PM

Enzoamps

Well, I am useless, and I have lasted 75 years so far.

 

52 years and 8 months here and I had a hoodie that proclaimed I was "useless" in full embroidery!  Laugh

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Saturday, June 25, 2022 9:29 PM

Becky, sounds like you were born around my 15th birthday, so I'v been able to practice being useless a decade and a half longer.

My youngest son was into Thomas when he was younger and I would occasionally read some of the railway stories as part of the night time ritual. He will be starting his senior year at Purdue in a couple of months.

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Posted by rrnut282 on Friday, July 1, 2022 12:52 PM

pennytrains

 

 
 

 

 

52 years and 8 months here and I had a hoodie that proclaimed I was "useless" in full embroidery!  Laugh

 

How about a red Star Trek uniform shirt emblazioned with "expendable?"

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, July 1, 2022 8:26 PM

Funny how that changed around Wrath of Kahn and then came back with the most recent trilogy.  Red shirt guy got a reprieve!

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Posted by zugmann on Saturday, July 2, 2022 12:44 PM

pennytrains
Funny how that changed around Wrath of Kahn and then came back with the most recent trilogy. 

It hurts when you use those in the same sentence. 

  

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Posted by Shrike Arghast on Sunday, July 3, 2022 7:55 PM

I'd heard about this before. I think it's kind of an open secret in British railfanning.

On the whole, I want to say that British rail engineering took a different approach from that in the United States. Outside a few standouts like Pennsy, U.S. railroads defaulted to major manufacturing firms to design and produce locomotive classes (with the roads obviously providing heavy input on what they wanted). One of the results of this is that America generally (although there were definitely some notable exceptions - especially in the late 19th and earlier 20th century) did not produce entire classes of engines that were grossly flawed. This is in marked contrast to Britain, where much of the locomotive design and development was done in-house on railway lines (at least before consolidation under BR), typically under the auspices of a single authority figure. And if this figure was wrong about something, a whole class might end up being built that was junk. 

I'm not trying to dish on Britain, because a) some of the greatest all-time steam designs originated from this practice, and b) the U.S. still skunked things all the time, and in a lot of different ways. But it seems like I'm always reading about whole batches of British locomotives that were essentially unusuable, and then seeing the same chief designer(s) names coming up. Where as here in the states, you couldn't typically shake a finger at one single person and say "yeah, he designed that crap class of engines that nobody wanted."

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Posted by 54light15 on Monday, July 4, 2022 8:40 PM

That is true what you say. In the U.S. it didn't seem like there were any famous locomotive designers like William Stanier or Nigel Gresley. 

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Tuesday, July 5, 2022 1:46 AM

Off the top of my head, Mathias Forney, Axel Vogt, Samuel Vauclain, William Woodward, William Mason, Ephraim Shay, Paul Kiefer - Americans all.

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Posted by BigJim on Tuesday, July 5, 2022 3:03 PM

BEAUSABRE

Off the top of my head, Mathias Forney, Axel Vogt, Samuel Vauclain, William Woodward, William Mason, Ephraim Shay, Paul Kiefer - Americans all.


...and John Pilcher!

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 5, 2022 7:07 PM

BigJim
 
BEAUSABRE

Off the top of my head, Mathias Forney, Axel Vogt, Samuel Vauclain, William Woodward, William Mason, Ephraim Shay, Paul Kiefer - Americans all.

And Voyce Glaze!!
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Wednesday, July 6, 2022 10:08 AM

Otto Jableman would be on that list.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, July 6, 2022 10:18 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
Otto Jableman would be on that list.

Jabelmann, and his predecessor A.H.Fetters, too.  While you're out in that part of the country, Ripley of ATSF certainly qualifies...

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Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, July 6, 2022 4:57 PM

How about Thomas Rogers?

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, July 6, 2022 10:01 PM

From the B&O I'll throw out Ross Wians and George Emerson.

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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, July 7, 2022 7:15 PM

Honest question: does Baldwin belong on our list?  I don't know that much about him.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, July 7, 2022 7:22 PM

pennytrains

Honest question: does Baldwin belong on our list?  I don't know that much about him.

 

If we go back to the Pioneer Period then certainly Matthias Baldwin belongs on the list. 

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, July 8, 2022 8:25 AM

Most of the pioneers mentioned in Angus Sinclair's History of the Locomotive Engine.  See also that poem about different locomotive bells, which gives a list of contemporarily-known engine builders.

Including Eddy, who is also famous for enabling a major religion.  And McQueen of 999 fame.

Inexplicably no one has mentioned Cole at Alco, who was one of the major figures at a defining time in American locomotive engineering.

Ralph Johnson was good enough to write one of the major American textbooks on steam-locomotive engineering -- my copy was the 1983 reprint, and I think there are later ones.  Strangely, there is not a word about the duplex principle in any of the editions I've seen.

Besler had a railroad presence, including the B&O W-1 constant-torque, and Doble at least thought about rail applications.  Stanley of course made the Unit Railcar.  I don't know if there was a 'chief designer' for the International steam railcar in the late Twenties, but both the steam generator and the engine were interesting... it was just that Dilworth et al. were better at it, and GM kicked the game into whole new levels...

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