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2-8-2's and 2-10-0's

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2-8-2's and 2-10-0's
Posted by greyhounds on Saturday, May 12, 2007 1:57 PM

What is the correct pronunciation of:

1) "Mikado"

2) "Decapod"

?

I may die someday and I'd like to know first. 

 

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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 12, 2007 3:36 PM

Mikado: "Mike-ah-doe"

Decapod: "Deck-ah-pod"

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Posted by cprted on Saturday, May 12, 2007 6:27 PM
 4884bigboy wrote:

Mikado: "Mike-ah-doe"

Decapod: "Deck-ah-pod"

Everyone I know pronounces it Mic-ah-doe.
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Posted by nanaimo73 on Saturday, May 12, 2007 8:31 PM
mi (i as in pit) KA (a as in father) do (o as in toe).   
Dale
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, May 12, 2007 10:40 PM

On the Southern, 2-8-2s were pronounced:

Fawty-five honnids

Fawty-six honnids

Fawty-seven honnids

Fawty-eight honnids

And so on . . .

 

Ol' Ed 

 

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Posted by dehusman on Sunday, May 13, 2007 12:55 PM

I've heard it pronounced  Mi-Kah-Doe, instead Mike-Ah-Doe.

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Posted by jimrice4449 on Sunday, May 13, 2007 3:15 PM
mik AH doe   DECK a pod.   The accent makes a difference.   I once heard somebody pronounce it MIK ah doe, in spite of the (I thought) well known Gilbert and Sulivan opereta.
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Posted by orsonroy on Sunday, May 13, 2007 3:43 PM

2-8-2: Mike

2-10-0: Deck

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Posted by J. Edgar on Sunday, May 13, 2007 4:57 PM

 2-8-2   "mike"

 2-10-0  "russian"

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Posted by greyhounds on Monday, May 14, 2007 1:25 AM

OK, how 'bout the 2-6-0?

Mo-Gul?

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Posted by snagletooth on Monday, May 14, 2007 1:46 AM

 jimrice4449 wrote:
mik AH doe   DECK a pod.   The accent makes a difference.   I once heard somebody pronounce it MIK ah doe, in spite of the (I thought) well known Gilbert and Sulivan opereta.
tomato, tomato? I've always heard it pronounced more like durg "mic" as in MC-ah-doe. The nikename usely being Mike, but I've heard people call them mic's. I've also heard often  me-kah-doe. But I sure mik(e)-ah-doe is the proper way.

 And Moguls are, I think, is magyule. As is ma(your ma is callin you home)g-yule. Thought most peolpe pronounce as mogols, like a media mogol.  

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Posted by wjstix on Monday, May 14, 2007 8:04 AM

2-8-2's were "Mikes" for short, but Mikado is pronounced "mick-KAH-doe". It's the title of the Emperor of Japan, supposedly the first US built 2-8-2's were built for export to Asia. During WW2 they were called "Macs" for "MacArthurs" BTW.

2-10-0's are "DECK-a-pods", "Dec" meaning 10 in Latin, like decimal system or December...well OK, December is now the 12th month, but in Roman times, it was the 10th. (Sept=7, Octo=8, Novum=9, Decem=10.) 

Stix
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Posted by ragnar on Thursday, May 17, 2007 6:45 PM
I've always heard it as MA-KAAD-O It is correct that the Mikado was a title affixed to the Emperor of Japan 
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Posted by Tulyar15 on Thursday, May 24, 2007 1:47 AM
Yes, that's right, Mikado was the title used by the Emperor of Japan.
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, May 25, 2007 2:06 PM
2-10-0's customarily had a reputation for being rough riding, so most of the names used for them by engine crews are probably unprintableBig Smile [:D]
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Posted by Semper Vaporo on Friday, May 25, 2007 5:16 PM

To avoid ambiguity when discussing these locomotives with someone that has some knowledge of what a Steam Locomotive is you can use the following pronunciations: 

1) Mikado is pronounced :  "Two-Eight-Two".

2) Decapod is pronounced : "Two-Ten-Oh".

Alternatively, when describing them to the general public, both can be pronounced :

"Chu-Choo".

These methods save lots of extraneous explanations!

 

Semper Vaporo

Pkgs.

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Friday, May 25, 2007 6:44 PM

For the linguistically challenged who have problems pronouncing tsu (as in Tsushima Strait), the word Mikado has three syllables, each represented (in katakana or hiragana) by a single symbol.

The accepted (by Japanese and Japanophones) pronunciations:

  • Mi - me, that guy that hangs out with Myself  and I.
  • Ka - kah, proper Bostonian for automobile.
  • Do - doe, "a deer, a female deer..."

The ungarbled, Imperially sealed word.  Accept no substitutes.

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - with D50 and D51 class 2-8-2s)

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Posted by snagletooth on Saturday, May 26, 2007 3:38 AM
 tomikawaTT wrote:

For the linguistically challenged who have problems pronouncing tsu (as in Tsushima Strait), the word Mikado has three syllables, each represented (in katakana or hiragana) by a single symbol.

The accepted (by Japanese and Japanophones) pronunciations:

  • Mi - me, that guy that hangs out with Myself  and I.
  • Ka - kah, proper Bostonian for automobile.
  • Do - doe, "a deer, a female deer..."

The ungarbled, Imperially sealed word.  Accept no substitutes.

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - with D50 and D51 class 2-8-2s)

It's "ME, an,name, I call myself, LA, a long, long way to run" (I'm SOOO embaressed!Ashamed [*^_^*], No, I'm not one of those, I just had 2 older sister's and no brothers in band, and they played ALL those musicals CONSTANLY! Anyone know South Pacific? How about Oklahoma? Seven brides for Seven brothers? I'm Don Queont e hote, the Lord of Lamancha, My estiny calls and I go  Please, anyone sympathize?Disapprove [V])Release me from this musical H..L! You know what, I believe you. I've read youre thread responsise on Japanese RW's. tsu- isnt that like a cross between "SOO" line  and "ZOO"?  I always pronounces it  "ZOO(as in zoot suit)shima.  But then it also say SOOgahme. Is that wrong?

 I know he's looking for the proper way, and i think you got it, but American accent belittles it, I think. To me , it'll always be McCAdo, with a Scot-Irish slang. Sorry!Blindfold [X-)]Disapprove [V]

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Posted by Semper Vaporo on Saturday, May 26, 2007 11:49 AM
 tomikawaTT wrote:

For the linguistically challenged who have problems pronouncing tsu (as in Tsushima Strait), the word Mikado has three syllables, each represented (in katakana or hiragana) by a single symbol.

The accepted (by Japanese and Japanophones) pronunciations:

  • Mi - me, that guy that hangs out with Myself  and I.
  • Ka - kah, proper Bostonian for automobile.
  • Do - doe, "a deer, a female deer..."

The ungarbled, Imperially sealed word.  Accept no substitutes.

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - with D50 and D51 class 2-8-2s)

Any particular syllable for the accent?

Any syllable held for a longer/shorter count?

MEEE-kahdoe

MEkahhh-doe

meee-KAHdoe

meKAHHH-doe

etc.

??

 

Semper Vaporo

Pkgs.

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Saturday, May 26, 2007 3:57 PM
 Semper Vaporo wrote:
 tomikawaTT wrote:

For the linguistically challenged who have problems pronouncing tsu (as in Tsushima Strait), the word Mikado has three syllables, each represented (in katakana or hiragana) by a single symbol.

The accepted (by Japanese and Japanophones) pronunciations:

  • Mi - me, that guy that hangs out with Myself  and I.
  • Ka - kah, proper Bostonian for automobile.
  • Do - doe, "a deer, a female deer..."

The ungarbled, Imperially sealed word.  Accept no substitutes.

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - with D50 and D51 class 2-8-2s)

Any particular syllable for the accent?

Any syllable held for a longer/shorter count?

MEEE-kahdoe

MEkahhh-doe

meee-KAHdoe

meKAHHH-doe

etc.

??

 

The last is close, but no cigar.  meKAH-doe hits it - the accent is on the ka, but is very slight.  None of the vowels are held.

Incidentally, the city name Hiroshima is properly pronounced He-row-SHE-ma.  The usual mispronunciation, he-ROH-shi-ma, raises hackles in western Honshu.  (The latter is Tokyo dialect, which the folks away from the Kanto Plain think of as the Japanese equivalent of Brooklynese.)

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964)

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Posted by wjstix on Friday, June 15, 2007 2:18 PM

 Tulyar15 wrote:
Yes, that's right, Mikado was the title used by the Emperor of Japan.

I think it still is, just doesn't come up as often?? Confused [%-)]

Stix
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Posted by wjstix on Friday, June 15, 2007 2:23 PM
 tomikawaTT wrote:

For the linguistically challenged who have problems pronouncing tsu (as in Tsushima Strait), the word Mikado has three syllables, each represented (in katakana or hiragana) by a single symbol.

The accepted (by Japanese and Japanophones) pronunciations:

  • Mi - me, that guy that hangs out with Myself  and I.
  • Ka - kah, proper Bostonian for automobile.
  • Do - doe, "a deer, a female deer..."

The ungarbled, Imperially sealed word.  Accept no substitutes.

Chuck (modeling Central Japan in September, 1964 - with D50 and D51 class 2-8-2s)

Of course, be pretty odd for Americans to pronounce a foreign word correctly (though we're much better than the British)!! I think "mick-KAH-doe" is the normal US version...just like we call Mallets "malleys"  instead of "Mahl-LAYS. Smile [:)]

Doubt that'll change, for 40+ years we've been calling Ray Davies of the Kinks Ray "Day-vees" instead of the correct Ray "Day-vis".  

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Posted by selector on Friday, June 15, 2007 4:23 PM
2-6-0 Mogul is "MOW gll".
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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, June 17, 2007 8:21 PM
I've heard 2-8-2s called a micca-doo with the accent on micca.
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Posted by tdmidget on Monday, June 18, 2007 12:35 AM
mikka-doo? Maybe they were dikka-heads

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Posted by jockellis on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 11:26 PM
G'day, Y'all,
All righty now. We''ve established that there are several ways to pronouce 2-8-2 and 2-10-0. So how do you pronounce Berkshire?
Incidentally, the last few days I've been trying to sing that song from Sound of Music and only yesterday I was able to sing it through without having to say do-ray-me-fa, etc. after each verse. It was a good feeling.

Jock Ellis Cumming, GA US of A Georgia Association of Railroad Passengers

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Posted by wjstix on Thursday, June 21, 2007 12:32 PM

"BERK-sher" with the last part prounced as in "her" with an "s" in front..."sher".

I'm guessing in the UK it would be pronounced "Berk-SHY-er".

One a side note speaking of English English, I used to listen to the BBC World Service a lot, and it used to be fun to hear the trouble they had pronouncing American names and place names. Apparently it's hard for a Londoner to accept that Houston (Texas) is prounounced the same as Euston station, they'd always end up saying something like "WHO-ston". Genl Norman Schwarzkopf's name was always pronounced with the w pronounced like a hard v: "SchVARTZkoff". If they played something by Weird Al Yankovic it was always pronounced "Yank-o-vitch" instead of "vick" at the end.

Smile,Wink, & Grin [swg]

Stix
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Posted by Semper Vaporo on Thursday, June 21, 2007 3:06 PM

We are a people divided by a common language.

Of course, the French think we are nuts the way we pronounce the French words we have usurped... and the Italians, and the Germans, and the Spanish, etc., etc., etc.

The Chinese were gracious enough to "allow" the English to totally screwup the names of Chinese cities... "Peking" instead of "Beijing" (which is not all that good of a phonetic spelling, either!!!!).

 

Semper Vaporo

Pkgs.

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