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How they did it in 1950s Germany

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How they did it in 1950s Germany
Posted by 54light15 on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 10:31 AM
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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 5:26 PM

Roller-bearing rods, every surface machined... under 70mph top allowed speed.

 

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Posted by pennytrains on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 7:03 PM

If somebody had shown me a film like that on career day when I was in school I'd have said "Sign me up now!"  Of course, first they would have to have had a "career day" in ye olden days of the 1970's!  Wink

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 7:51 PM

Overmod

Roller-bearing rods, every surface machined... under 70mph top allowed speed.

 

 

I'm surprised that what I regard as the major new feature of the Class 23, the welded one piece frame, was not even illustrated. This was the German equivalent of the cast engine bed, although of course the cast cylinders were still bolted to the frame. With the Class 10 the cast cylinders, all three in one casting, were welded into the frame. This had its own problems, of course if the cylinders were damaged, but no worse than a one piece bed where the cylinders were damaged.

I find it helpful to turn on the text captions, since even in German it makes it following the context much easier.

Peter

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 7:57 PM

pennytrains

If somebody had shown me a film like that on career day when I was in school I'd have said "Sign me up now!"  Of course, first they would have to have had a "career day" in ye olden days of the 1970's!  Wink

 

I remember a careers day in the 1960s when my mother, who had worked in a law firm, was appalled at my lack of knowledge of legal activities. I eventually studied engineering, of course.

Peter

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 8:40 PM

54light15

What is the eccentric action from the rear driver powering?

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by kgbw49 on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 9:08 PM

They built 105 of these beauties. They apparently could do 53 mph in reverse.

 

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Posted by kgbw49 on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 9:29 PM

Here is a bit more data.

They built 105 of these West German beauties from 1950-1959, delivered by four different builders.

68 mph top speed forward.

53 mph top speed in reverse.

68 7/8 inch drivers.

228 psi boiler pressure.

32,187 lbs tractive effort.

8.8 tons coal and 7,900 gallons water in the tender on two four-wheel trucks.

They were operational into 1976.

Sounds like a really useful engine to me.

Here is a neat video on one in operation.

https://www.eisenbahnfreunde-berlin.net/en/drg-class-23/

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Posted by Ulrich on Thursday, October 6, 2022 2:20 PM

I probably saw an example of several on a visit to Germany in 1970 but was too young to remember anything other than "everything was steam south of Mannheim".  

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Thursday, October 6, 2022 3:45 PM

54light15

Vielen Dank!

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Posted by 7j43k on Friday, October 7, 2022 10:36 PM

BaltACD

 

 

 

 
54light15

 

What is the eccentric action from the rear driver powering?

 

 

 It's very lightly loaded.  Perhaps a water pump or a lube pump.

 

Ed

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, October 8, 2022 9:12 AM

I'd suggest drive to a speed recorder or valve-pilot-like mechanism, not dependent on a friction wheel.

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