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Converted new Rapido HO Union Pacific E9A to Southern Pacific

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  • Member since
    June 2011
  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
  • 150 posts
Converted new Rapido HO Union Pacific E9A to Southern Pacific
Posted by BruceK on Monday, June 26, 2023 10:36 AM
This Southern Pacific E9A Locomotive started as a brand new Rapido Union Pacific E9A. It was completely stripped and re-detailed using purchased and many handmade detailed parts.
Unlike many other locomotives I’ve done, I wanted to capture the unique weathering of a locomotive abandoned in the dry California environment where there is less rust and more oxidation and paint streaking. The base coat paint was applied with an airbrush, but all the color was hand painted with many different colors of oil paints so each of the body panels took on their own shades of color and streaking caused by water.

 

HO Scale Southern Pacific E9A Locomotive

 

  • Member since
    November 2007
  • From: California
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Posted by HO-Velo on Monday, June 26, 2023 12:51 PM

Outstanding modeling!  A labor of love.  The level of weathering realism that can be achieved by the skillful, if not artistic application of oils is truly amazing.  Great photo too!  As well as a delight to the eye, your work is an inspiration.

Might I inquire as to the location of the photo?  The hillside rock formations are reminiscent of the Columbia River gorge.

Thanks and regards, Peter

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Posted by maxman on Monday, June 26, 2023 2:15 PM

BruceK
 

HO Scale Southern Pacific E9A Locomotive

 

 

Looks great.  Now show us a picture of the modelBig Smile

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Posted by AntonioFP45 on Monday, June 26, 2023 3:21 PM

Bruce, outstanding realistic results! YesCool.

This is the 1st time I've seen a Rapido unit that has been completely paint stripped and refinished to another road.  If you don't mind my asking, what did you use for paint stripping?

"I like my Pullman Standards & Budds in Stainless Steel flavors, thank you!"

 


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    January 2013
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Posted by PM Railfan on Monday, June 26, 2023 4:08 PM

Holy cow! Our models can look like that? It is a work of art. Can only imagine the time this took. Definately this weeks winner of the "that kicks brass" award! 

 

PMR

  • Member since
    June 2011
  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
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Posted by BruceK on Monday, June 26, 2023 7:57 PM

Hi Peter,

Thanks for the comment.

You're close. The picture was taken in Naches WA (Close to Yakima WA where I live).

 

Bruce

  • Member since
    June 2011
  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
  • 150 posts
Posted by BruceK on Monday, June 26, 2023 8:16 PM

AntonioFP45

Bruce, outstanding realistic results! YesCool.

This is the 1st time I've seen a Rapido unit that has been completely paint stripped and refinished to another road.  If you don't mind my asking, what did you use for paint stripping?

 

 

Thanks for the comment. There was actually a disapointing story behind the paint used by Rapido on this loco and the side grills... which I won't discuss here...

I've stripped many locos of every brand including Rapido using Alcohol, but on this loco Alcohol just made it a sticky mess. Then I tried Scalecoat II paint remover which did nothing. Finally, I tried the older ELO from Testors which did the best. It took me over two weeks to strip to bare plastic (instead of the normal two days)!

I made a YouTube video of this project and it shows it stripped.

 

Bruce

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Good ol' USA
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Posted by AntonioFP45 on Monday, June 26, 2023 10:12 PM

Bruce,

You're most welcome! Your unit would make a good article for MRR Magazine. What is the name of your YouTube page as I would like to see the video?

Thanks for your reply. I've stripped many models over the years, but not a Rapido (yet). 91% ISO alcohol was my usual "go to" model paint stripper for years, but switched to the purple "Super Clean"  product as I've found it to be effective for some stubborn jobs. I'm wondering now if it would be effective on a Rapido shell.

BruceK
 
AntonioFP45

Bruce, outstanding realistic results! YesCool.

This is the 1st time I've seen a Rapido unit that has been completely paint stripped and refinished to another road.  If you don't mind my asking, what did you use for paint stripping?

 

 

 

Thanks for the comment. There was actually a disapointing story behind the paint used by Rapido on this loco and the side grills... which I won't discuss here...

I've stripped many locos of every brand including Rapido using Alcohol, but on this loco Alcohol just made it a sticky mess. Then I tried Scalecoat II paint remover which did nothing. Finally, I tried the older ELO from Testors which did the best. It took me over two weeks to strip to bare plastic (instead of the normal two days)!

I made a YouTube video of this project and it shows it stripped.

 

Bruce

 

"I like my Pullman Standards & Budds in Stainless Steel flavors, thank you!"

 


  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 15,507 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 1:33 AM

Okay Bruce, that is absolutely amazing!!! I can smell the rust and decay!

I have been reluctant to start weathering my fleet. Now I know what to strive for. Thank you for the inspiration.

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    June 2007
  • 8,845 posts
Posted by riogrande5761 on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 6:53 AM

When did Rapido offer E9As?  I was only aware of the E8A's.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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    July 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 7,564 posts
Posted by rrebell on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 7:46 AM

If this is a model, yes it is that good and I try to tell it as it is, I may have found a item that was not perfect, mine you, may have. If you look at the back of an air horn you can make out what looks to be whats left of a parting line after blowing the picture up to G scale.

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Posted by AEP528 on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 10:00 AM

Here's a link to a photo of an SP E9A in the same condition. Once you see the real thing, it's very easy to distinguish the model. Couldn't find a picture of SP E9A 7925, because SP 7925 was a U30C.

  • Member since
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  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
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Posted by BruceK on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 10:23 AM

AntonioFP45

Bruce,

You're most welcome! Your unit would make a good article for MRR Magazine. What is the name of your YouTube page as I would like to see the video?

Thanks for your reply. I've stripped many models over the years, but not a Rapido (yet). 91% ISO alcohol was my usual "go to" model paint stripper for years, but switched to the purple "Super Clean"  product as I've found it to be effective for some stubborn jobs. I'm wondering now if it would be effective on a Rapido shell.

 

 
BruceK
 
AntonioFP45

Bruce, outstanding realistic results! YesCool.

This is the 1st time I've seen a Rapido unit that has been completely paint stripped and refinished to another road.  If you don't mind my asking, what did you use for paint stripping?

 

 

 

Thanks for the comment. There was actually a disapointing story behind the paint used by Rapido on this loco and the side grills... which I won't discuss here...

I've stripped many locos of every brand including Rapido using Alcohol, but on this loco Alcohol just made it a sticky mess. Then I tried Scalecoat II paint remover which did nothing. Finally, I tried the older ELO from Testors which did the best. It took me over two weeks to strip to bare plastic (instead of the normal two days)!

I made a YouTube video of this project and it shows it stripped.

 

Bruce

 

 

 

 

 

Just Goggle "bruce kingsley e9a locomotive"

  • Member since
    June 2011
  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
  • 150 posts
Posted by BruceK on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 10:42 AM

hon30critter

Okay Bruce, that is absolutely amazing!!! I can smell the rust and decay!

I have been reluctant to start weathering my fleet. Now I know what to strive for. Thank you for the inspiration.

Cheers!!

Dave

 

 

Thanks hon30critter for the comment!

This was a very different project for me, mostly where most of the painting was done with oil paints and a brush rather than an airbrush. The colors used is also missleading. To get the "once was gray, but now oxidized" the colors I used where different shades of Blue!

Bruce.

  • Member since
    June 2011
  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
  • 150 posts
Posted by BruceK on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 10:49 AM

The windshield wipers were not purchased. I made them from scratch with mutiple very small etched parts to give it a "working look" rather than a single "flat" etched part stuck in a hole.

Bruce

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 11:27 AM

E8's and E9's shared the same outward appearance just about down to the last rivet. There may be a few VERY minor differences depending on when a particular E8 was built, or road specific details. But the change over to the E9 was strictly a mechanical equipment upgrade.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by AntonioFP45 on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 3:22 PM

Bruce, excellent video, along with the other videos that you have on your YouTube page.

Guys, here's the YouTube Link: 

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JaefMsjcrA

"I like my Pullman Standards & Budds in Stainless Steel flavors, thank you!"

 


  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 15,507 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, June 27, 2023 7:46 PM

BruceK
This was a very different project for me, mostly where most of the painting was done with oil paints and a brush rather than an airbrush. The colors used is also missleading. To get the "once was gray, but now oxidized" the colors I used where different shades of Blue!

Hi again Bruce,

Did you happen to take any pictures of the painting process? I'm sure a lot of us would be really interested in learning how you did it.

Cheers!!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    June 2011
  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
  • 150 posts
Posted by BruceK on Wednesday, June 28, 2023 2:13 PM

hon30critter

 

 
BruceK
This was a very different project for me, mostly where most of the painting was done with oil paints and a brush rather than an airbrush. The colors used is also missleading. To get the "once was gray, but now oxidized" the colors I used where different shades of Blue!

 

Hi again Bruce,

Did you happen to take any pictures of the painting process? I'm sure a lot of us would be really interested in learning how you did it.

Cheers!!

Dave

 

 

Dave,

No, I didn’t take any picture of the final painting process. Below is some of the basic information I remember.

At first, I didn’t even know if painting with oils would even work, but knowing the oils would be easy to remove mineral spirits, I thought it was worth experimenting.  The reason behind even thinking about using oils was because when I studied the prototype photos (I must have spent over 10 hours taking notes) I noticed some important, and challenging observations:

1. The color looked more blue than gray. I used Photoshop on the prototype photos to validate this. I also did some tests on the prototype photos to see if camera setting/film used or when it was developed if the “white balance temperature” was too high which would make take on a blue hue. From what I could find, the temperature looked correct.

2. Each side panel of the locomotive had its own different shades of color, not to mention all the different streaking colors. Even if I used my Iwata HP-BH airbrush which can do very fine lines, I knew it would look like it was airbrushed.

3. I didn’t want to lose the details of plastic shell. When I removed the original Rapido paint, I was surprised how much detail was lost due to the thickness of their paint. Using conventional paint with so many different colors would risk making the paint layer thick again.

This is the basic steps I used to paint the locomotive:

1. I first applied a “dusting” of what I call the “rust layer”. I used Tamiya Hull-Red XF-9 flat paint highly thinned and airbrushed with very low pressure. I let this layer dry for two weeks.

2. Next, I applied a gloss layer of Tamiya (custom mixture of blues) highly thinned and airbrushed with very low pressure. Unlike the “Rust Layer”, I only waited a day for it to dry.  You can see this color on my YouTube video.

3. Then I applied all the decals including the “bloody nose”. 

4. Once the decals were all set and shrunk around all the shell details, I airbrushed a thin layer of AK Interactive Ultra Matte. 

5. Using a very small “micro pointed” T-Tips and Windex, I rub through the last layers exposing the rust later. On other projects I might have used the “chipping fluid” method, but on this locomotive the rust is being exposed through the paint, not due to the paint flaking off which would give it a raised edge.

6. Now the time-consuming part. Using a very small (0000) brush and palette (I use a piece of cardboard to soak up excess oil) of different shades of blue and other color oil paint thinned a little with mineral spirits (like watercolors).  With the shell lying flat, each panel is painted separately with strokes top to bottom. Don’t have to worry about being perfect.

7. Give about a day for the oils to dry. Using a lint-free cloth on a small silicone angled brush, burnish the dried oils from top to bottom to blend the colors.

8. Using a very small (0000) brush again. Lay the shell on 45 degree angle and drop very, very small amounts of mineral spirits on the top of the panel where streaking is desired, and let gravity do the rest. Once it reaches the bottom of the panel, lay the shell flat. Do not use the brush to apply the streaking! You only get one chance for this, if too much mineral spirits is applied that collects on the bottom of the panel, try to catch it with a tissue, or remove the oils and start over.

9. If it looks good, let it dry for a couple of days and I applied another thin layer of I applied another thin layer of AK Interactive Ultra Matte to protect my work to protect my work before doing another side of the shell.

10. For areas where I wanted texture (like the fuel tank), I mixed AK Interactive Ultra Matte with a little weathering powder. Once dry, I used oils to stain it to the appropriate colors.

 

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, June 28, 2023 7:54 PM

Hi Bruce,

Thank you so much for the detailed explanation of how you painted the shell. It must have taken a considerable amount of time using such a tiny brush. Your choice of colours (i.e. blue over rust) is quite intriguing given that the final result has so much depth to it.

Just an amazing job!!!

Thanks again for sharing your technique.

Cheers!!

Dave

 

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    June 2011
  • From: Yakima, Washington USA
  • 150 posts
Posted by BruceK on Thursday, June 29, 2023 1:33 PM

andree23

 

The images in the video are very detailed and clear, thank you for sharing the natf link. Did you take any pictures of the painting process?

 

 

Hi Antonio,

No, but look at my long reply to Dave above on the same question where I captured as much as I could remeber.

Bruce

  • Member since
    November 2007
  • From: California
  • 2,301 posts
Posted by HO-Velo on Sunday, July 9, 2023 4:26 PM

Bruce,  Your model and tutorial renewed my interest in oil paint weathering.  The working of individual panels with mulitiple effects is intriguing.  Using a piece of cardboard as a palette to leach out the oil in the paint is a good tip.  Learning from your work and Michael Rinaldi's "Oil Paint Rendering" has shown me a new path to follow, along with more insight into how "the weathering can tell many stories about a model."  

Thanks again and regards, Peter

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