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Silver Streak and Red Ball

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Posted by John-NYBW on Tuesday, September 27, 2022 4:58 PM

There is a simple solution for out of scale models. Don't measure anything. It works for me.

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Posted by wjstix on Tuesday, September 27, 2022 2:47 PM

The Athearn "blue box" 40' steel and woodsided reefers were based on cars with 10'-6" height, which became typical for new 40' house cars built after the mid-1930s. The TrainMiniature (later Walthers) reefer is based on an earlier car, that IIRC had 8'-6" height.

In any case, it seems the farther back you go in the hobby's history, the more scale becomes less exact. For example, many "HO" figures made available over the decades were more than a bit oversize, compared to the more fine scale ones from say Preiser.

Stix
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Posted by "JaBear" on Saturday, September 24, 2022 3:07 PM
“…but I wonder if I misinterpreted it.
 
No, I don’t think you did.
 
“The sizes certainly vary. But I think the difference between them is small.
 
I chose this link because it shows the plan of a PRR XLc Automotive Boxcar, similar in purpose and time frame to the boxcar plan you posted, above.
While I haven’t spent a lot of time on comparing the two drawings, in HO scale the differences in measurement, in HO scale, vary between a “gnats whisker" to around 3mm (1/8”).
 
 
Then as previously alluded to, any model relies on the modelmakers dedication to follow prototype fidelity.  
 
My 2 Cents Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by BN7150 on Saturday, September 24, 2022 1:30 PM

I lined up the plastic models I had. From top to bottom: Athearn (Canada Dry), Train-Miniature/Walthers (Goetz), Accurail/Branchline (Century), and Atlas (Storck Club). The sizes certainly vary. But I think the difference between them is small.

Since there was a relationship with ice stages, the height of each reefer would have been unified to some extent.

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Posted by "JaBear" on Saturday, September 24, 2022 6:55 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
If you search long enough, and look at enough different drawings, you will find lots of minor variations in the prototype.

While the height variations are immediately obvious, I believe this photo illustrates Sheldon’s point well.
 
 
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by John-NYBW on Saturday, September 24, 2022 6:39 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

And yes, early model manufacturers economized on parts, close enough was good enough.

Sheldon

 
That's always been the case with me. When I see a 20 car freight train rolling through a scene am I really going to notice that some of the cars  might not be accurate down to the last detail? Even if I knew the details were incorrect (which I don't) it's not going to detract at all from the scene. If other people want to obsess over such things, they are welcome to do so. It has never bothered me.
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, September 24, 2022 6:33 AM

Other simple fact, just like passenger cars, they came in various lengths from various builders at various times.

If you search long enough, and look at enough different drawings, you will find lots of minor variations in the prototype.

And yes, early model manufacturers economized on parts, close enough was good enough.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by BN7150 on Saturday, September 24, 2022 2:45 AM

I used the following drawings for the underframe of the Walthers car, but I wonder if I misinterpreted it.

Taken from the Car Builders' Dictionary 1912 by the Master Car Builders' Association

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Posted by drgwcs on Friday, September 23, 2022 4:14 PM

A 40 foot car was a bit of a misnomer. It was the interior length of 40' 6" that was standard. The exterior size could vary. It was affected by the structure and framing as well as the interior and exterior sheeting.  Wood framed ends were often thicker. Car heights were even more varied. The variation you are showing is well within the realm of possibility. 

Jim

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Posted by dknelson on Friday, September 23, 2022 10:10 AM

The paper reefer side in the upper photo was of course meant to be trimmed to length.

As far as Silver Streak goes, I think their reefers and boxcars shared parts such as the wood floors, metal underframe and perhaps the wood roof.  So they weren't too intent on following a prototype length for each car side they offered.  Stated another way they were probably inclined to "stretch" the reefer sides to fit their parts.  

The lower photo of the boxcar looks a bit odd to me.  I think the floor is showing beneath the car sides, but was meant to be within the sides. and trimmed or filed if that is what it took.  The cast metal ends would provide the intended width and the various wood parts were "close" but not always "drop-in."

Silver Streak was of its era.  When carefully built they can look nice enough.  The separately added details such as grab irons can look clunky which ironically is why cast-on details on molded plastic car body shells seemed at the time to be something of an improvement  Even Kurtz Kraft separate grabs and ladders in plastic for their otherwise very nice PS1 boxcar looked a  bit clunky in size.  

Dave Nelson

 

 

 

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Posted by BN7150 on Friday, September 23, 2022 3:46 AM

The Silver Streak model is a little bigger, even in 1982 when it was owned by Walthers.

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Silver Streak and Red Ball
Posted by BN7150 on Friday, September 23, 2022 1:23 AM

Recently I have noticed that the HO-scale wood reefers from the two companies listed above are a bit large. Pictured below, from top to bottom, are Athearn (Coors), Silver Streak (Edelweiss), and Red Ball (Old Heidelberg). Measured, they are neither OO-scale nor the 9/64"-scale proposed by Gilbert HO. Anyone know anything?

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