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Weather a Diesel Engine

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  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: Lancaster, NH
  • 96 posts
Weather a Diesel Engine
Posted by B Rutherford on Tuesday, July 19, 2022 8:39 PM

Last question for tonight, I promise!

I am going to be weathering some of my diesels.  First step for me will be to airbrush some grime on the lower part of the engine.

I have watched a bunch of videos,  some guys dismantle the engine before weathering,  others weather without removing anything, just masking windows. 

I am wondering the best way and the pros / cons of each way (dismantled or not)

Thanks in advance!

- Bill Rutherford Lancaster, NH

Central Vermont Railroad 

  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 14,592 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 12:04 AM

I weather my rolling stock assembled with the occasional "pre-weathering of an underframe and/or trucks while disassembled. 

I made a stand that can be powered which allows for the drivers to rotate while very lightly applying road dust, sand dust and grime. For steam this also prevents uneven weathering on the drivers when hidden by the side rods.

 P5a_weather-stand by Edmund, on Flickr

There's a secure coupler at one end and I lightly coat the railtops with CRC 6-26 or similar which prevents chatter and helps reduce paint buildup on driver treads. The track portion is designed so the airbrush can access more of the underside. As shown above it is resting atop my rotating-pedistal painting stand.

 P5a_stand by Edmund, on Flickr

I've found many uses for Avery labels for masking windows and such:

 Avery_Mask-NYC-bay by Edmund, on Flickr

Even the round ones can sometimes come in handy:

 Avery_Mask-PRR by Edmund, on Flickr

Sometimes, though, I give another light coat of matte finish after the mask is removed as the windows can get as dusty as the rest of the car. Head-end cars would rarely see a car washer let alone someone actually washing the windows:

 PRR_B60b-detail by Edmund, on Flickr

On a few locomotive windshields I've made masks in the shape of the windshield wiper:

 NYC_1607_nose_edited-1 by Edmund, on Flickr

Just a thought...

Regards, Ed

  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: Lancaster, NH
  • 96 posts
Posted by B Rutherford on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 7:21 AM

Ed,

Thank you for replying, some great information and ideas in there!  I love the idea of avery labels and the powered section of track

- Bill Rutherford Lancaster, NH

Central Vermont Railroad 

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 2,309 posts
Posted by snjroy on Thursday, July 21, 2022 10:31 AM

I also mask the windows. I use small rollers that allow me to spray the wheels in motion. I have 2 pairs (Bachmanns), and they work fine.

Simon

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