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Need work on brass engine - help wanted

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  • Member since
    May 2020
  • 766 posts
Posted by wrench567 on Friday, June 17, 2022 10:05 PM

  Have you used it on brass? It may be comparable to 220 laying flat. Propel it at something soft like brass and see how it goes. It's like putting a 220 grit belt on a belt sander.

   Pete

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Posted by snjroy on Friday, June 17, 2022 9:58 PM

I've used soda using a Badger hobby blaster several times on brass locos. Soda is a fairly soft medium and in my experience, will not damage brass.

Simon

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Posted by PC101 on Friday, June 17, 2022 9:53 PM

wrench567
 
PC101

Could I have some input from you guys?

I have not heard any mention of ALUMINUM OXIDE ABRASIVE.

I hear and am listening to your knowledge/experience of the 'blasting' of the OP's problem loco.

May I ask what are your thoughts on using BADGERS ALUMINUM OXIDE ABRASIVE in the BADGER #260 tool on brass?   

 

 

 

    I used to use aluminum oxide media in a blast cabinet to clean diesel engine parts. In my opinion it would be way too aggressive on brass. With a soda blasting media you can drop the air pressure down to as low as 5 psi. A.O being larger would need 30 to 40 psi to come out of the nozzle. Better to use glass beads.

     Pete.

 

Thanks Pete. My A.O. is 220 grit.

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Posted by wrench567 on Friday, June 17, 2022 9:47 PM

PC101

Could I have some input from you guys?

I have not heard any mention of ALUMINUM OXIDE ABRASIVE.

I hear and am listening to your knowledge/experience of the 'blasting' of the OP's problem loco.

May I ask what are your thoughts on using BADGERS ALUMINUM OXIDE ABRASIVE in the BADGER #260 tool on brass?   

 

    I used to use aluminum oxide media in a blast cabinet to clean diesel engine parts. In my opinion it would be way too aggressive on brass. With a soda blasting media you can drop the air pressure down to as low as 5 psi. A.O being larger would need 30 to 40 psi to come out of the nozzle. Better to use glass beads.

     Pete.

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • 952 posts
Posted by PC101 on Friday, June 17, 2022 9:06 PM

Could I have some input from you guys?

I have not heard any mention of ALUMINUM OXIDE ABRASIVE.

I hear and am listening to your knowledge/experience of the 'blasting' of the OP's problem loco.

May I ask what are your thoughts on using BADGERS ALUMINUM OXIDE ABRASIVE in the BADGER #260 tool on brass?   

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • 317 posts
Posted by jcopilot on Monday, June 13, 2022 2:48 PM

Many thanks to all who offered ideas.  I've already had one brass engine 'blasted', but with what exactly, I don't know.  The tarnish may not be a factor in painting, but it will certainly come off with the soot.  The other engine was painted, lettered and is in active service.  My engines earn their keep, they are not display case queens.

Beyond the blasting and painting, I expect there to be work necessary on the motor and gears.  Additionally, I want a decoder and speaker installed, so there is much to be done.

Thanks again,

Jeff

If it's worth doing, it's worth doing twice.
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Posted by wrench567 on Sunday, June 12, 2022 6:53 PM

  Thank you Wayne for confirming my advice to the OP. In my opinion, blasting with any media would be a last resort. Even soda blasting can buckle or warp a thin sheet with one oops. Also your removing metal that can not be put back. My over fifty years as a big truck and mining equipment mechanic. We have had a lot of equipment sand blasted. Some guys are good but a majority have been horrible. Once that hood goes on the head, visibility goes out the window. One guy cut through a cross member because he thought a shadow was a deep rust area.

  I would strongly recommend a chemical or mild acid etch over blasting any day.

        Pete.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, June 12, 2022 4:40 PM

wrench567
The first thing I would do is disassemble it. Remove the motor and wash it real good with soap and water. Then you can get a better idea on how bad it is.

I agree...

wrench567
Tarnish is not an issue if you're going to paint it.

...and I agree with that, too.

Over the years, I've bought a few brass locomotives that were tarnished to varying degrees, and that did help to lower the cost.

Many years later, they're still running and still have paint in good condition. 

While a shiny brass loco in a glass display cabinet can look pretty nice, to me it seems a shame that it's not used as a loco would normally be used...moving trains and entertaining the owner.  The choice, of course is up to the owner.

A couple of mine...

...and a few, out of dozens, done for friends...

Wayne

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  • From: Milwaukee WI (Fox Point)
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Posted by dknelson on Sunday, June 12, 2022 10:34 AM

ndbprr

What you want is not sandblasting it is glass beading. Much finer grit and much smaller tooth in the brass.  Check with your local hobby shop for someone in your area who could help you

 

 
You might also try a jewelry/goldsmith shop - a real jewelers shop not those engagement ring outfits at the mall.  A real jeweler often uses the glass bead blasting to clean vintage or damaged jewelry.  They might scoff at working on a model train until they learn what brass sells for!  Then they'll feel right at home
 
Dave Nelson
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    September 2002
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Posted by ndbprr on Sunday, June 12, 2022 5:57 AM

What you want is not sandblasting it is glass beading. Much finer grit and much smaller tooth in the brass.  Check with your local hobby shop for someone in your area who could help you

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Posted by wrench567 on Saturday, June 11, 2022 4:36 PM

   Jeff.

  The first thing I would do is disassemble it. Remove the motor and wash it real good with soap and water. Then you can get a better idea on how bad it is. You don't sand blast brass. It will disappear or distort right before your eyes. Soda blasting is your best bet. Or even better yet would be a long soaking in vinegar or other mild acid. Tarnish is not an issue if you're going to paint it. But anyway you look at it, a good wash with hot water and soap is the starting point.

      Pete.

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    January 2019
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Posted by John-NYBW on Saturday, June 11, 2022 4:09 PM

I don't know about sandblasting it but I looked into getting an estate sale brass 2-6-6-2 painted and converted to DCC and the cost was prohibitive. The estimate I got was over $400. For that I could buy a new factory equipped loco. I've decided if it's going to get done, I will have to do it myself. 

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    August 2004
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Need work on brass engine - help wanted
Posted by jcopilot on Saturday, June 11, 2022 3:37 PM

Does anyone know of someone who can sandblast a brass engine to remove soot and tarnish from a housefire?  I'd be open to having the same person paint the engine even though I already have someone in mind, he just can't sandblast.

Thanks,

Jeff

If it's worth doing, it's worth doing twice.

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