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Air Brush Setups

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  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
  • 14,441 posts
Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 3:35 PM

Hi, Justin

I don't consider myself a pro by any means but I do seem to muddle by and manage to get the paint to stick now and then.

My "booth" set-up has evolved over the years but these few shots were made just a few nights ago. I recently put a high output T-5 fluorescent fixture up and that improved the lighting considerably. I have collected a bunch of easel pads and desk top calendars and that's what I have down as the work surface. When it gets too many spills and drips on it I peel a layer off and have a new, clean surface.

This compressor was chosen for its low noise. I can have it running while everyone else in the house is asleep... sometimes I do my best model work at 4 AM!

 

 

Here is the moisture/dirt trap and second regulator, the first being built in to the compressor (which I don't rely on since it can be WAY off due to the constant vibration of the little springs or the gauge may be off) My gauge is a 30 PSI liquid filled type that reduces pulsing and vibration. That second gauge used to show the tank pressure (it was a 0-160) but I was planning to set up another regulator. I have a 15 PSIG gauge that I might use for lower pressure work.

The old Paasche H is my go-to gun! The VL is for weathering and fine work... it takes a little more clean-up time.

 

Here's an overall view of the operating room and some brass Pennsy diners that just had the roof and underframes painted. I just got the air eraser and haven't played with it yet...

To the left you see a copper "funnel" which I made from a pipe reducer. It has a stainless 240 mesh screen in it to strain the paint before it goes into the color cup. I'm amazed how many lumps and gunk gets in the paint. Any little crumb will spoil your day!

 

 

 

Here you see lint free cotton gloves for handling equipment and keeping finger oils off, a few wood stands for propping jobs on so you can handle them while painting (I'll use coat hangers or sometimes screw metal brackets to the truck bolsters) a few parts for the Paasche, there's adrawer under the table for jars and parts; the air eraser; a jig for holding wheels for painting, just an aluminum [ with grooves cut in it (I have one of those Laserkit holders, too) and the bored out "wheel" there is just the right size for the color jar so I can set the gun down and it won't fall off the table. Sometimes the hanging hook is too fussy to get the gun safely in it. There's a box of lint-free wipers there, too, for those ever-present spills.

Just showin' what works for me Big Smile  Ed

  • Member since
    March 2008
  • From: Seattle Area
  • 1,788 posts
Posted by Capt. Grimek on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 2:01 PM

Look at the hobby, tanked, air compressors on T.C. Global's site. I'll see if I can come back with a link. But an airbrush compressor search via google should get you there. Very quiet and powerful for any airbrushing. Hardware store compressors will wake the dead indoors (and I won't use one in a garage without ear muff protectors). The T.C. Global compressors come with a moisture trap and a 2 year warrantee. I own one but no connection to the company.

Jim  Here's the link. T.C.P. Global, sorry:   http://www.tcpglobal.com/Airbrushing-Supplies/Compressors_4/  I have the TC-20 model but a double piston version that they don't seem to list anymore. They also have a good selection of paints and airbrushes. I bought an Iwata through them but haven't used it yet. 

In case you aren't aware, the tank has a drain valve on tanked compressors that needs to be drained off after each use. I'm a beginner too and this is all I know so far! If you plan on painting in your home with family members present you will be able to paint MUCH more often with a hobby compressor. My wife guarantees it!

Cheers.

Raised on the Erie Lackawanna Mainline- Supt. of the Black River Transfer & Terminal R.R.

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Mount Vernon WA
  • 968 posts
Posted by skagitrailbird on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 12:34 PM

I'm just guessing here but If noise is a problem you will probably be restricted to hobby type compressors. If airbrushing is your only need these should fill the bill. But if you have other uses in mind they will probably fall short. I use mine for many other things such as inflating tires and blowing dust off any number and type things. It can also be used to power air tools. But I couldn't operate it inside the house if anyone was sleeping, watching TV or trying to carry on a conversation. I always wear ear protection when operating it.

Roger Johnson
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 3,067 posts
Posted by chutton01 on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 11:04 AM

wdcrvr
Is your harbor freight compressor noisy?

I am looking for something that I can use in my basement without creating a lot of noise.

wdcrvr


I wouldn't say it's incredibly loud, but it is certainly not quiet and it does make noise when it comes on (it cycles on and off to keep the tank pressure up as I airbrush). It's not gas lawnmower or leaf blower loud, but that's not saying much. So if you need a compressor that's quiet, then that style is not for you, I'm afraid.

  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: Columbia, IL
  • 394 posts
Posted by wdcrvr on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 9:40 AM

Is your harbor freight compressor noisy?

I am looking for something that I can use in my basement without creating a lot of noise.

wdcrvr

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 3,067 posts
Posted by chutton01 on Sunday, November 16, 2014 5:46 PM

Don't have any pictures since it's in the garage, but my air compressor is a Harbor Freight similar to this one, which feeds via quick-disconnect into a Husky Moisture trap very similar to this one that I got from home depot, then via a quick disconnect into the legendary Badger air hose and Badger 200 Air Brush. I use a large panel supported by a rolling cart I got at Harbor freight, with a home-made airbrush holder clamped on.
Since I don't know exactly when I will airbrush, I always drain the airbrush tank before putting the compressor away to reduce the chance of rust in the tank.

JLK
  • Member since
    March 2011
  • From: Lancaster County PA
  • 158 posts
Posted by JLK on Sunday, November 16, 2014 4:08 PM

If I remember correctly, the regulator is also a moisture trap. I need to charge the tank with a little air compressor we have. The tank has the same vavle as a tire has. If I ever get serious about air brushing I will definitely need an upgrade.

 

Justin

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Mount Vernon WA
  • 968 posts
Posted by skagitrailbird on Sunday, November 16, 2014 3:36 PM

Is your five gallon tank connected to a compressor or do you have to refill it occasionally from external sources? Do you have a moisture trap on the air line leading to your air brush?

My set up is a small oil-less compressor mounted on a two gallon tank purchased at Costco many years ago.  There are two regulators: one controls the maximum air pressure in the tank, so the compressor goes off as the I draw down the pressure and, when activated, stops when it has reached the maximum pressure I select; the other regulates the outgoing air pressure to the air brush. Typically I have the maximum tank pressure set at about 100 PSI and the outgoing air at about 18-20 PSI. I have a moisture trap on the outgoing air line. My airbrush is a Badger 350 single action, external mix, botton feed model. Not fancy but it has done well on numerous projects.

Good luck.

Roger Johnson
  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
  • 8,517 posts
Posted by BATMAN on Sunday, November 16, 2014 3:30 PM

I usually have a great big compressor in the garage that I use by running a line into the trainroom, however right now I have a small one in there that won't even run an impact wrench. My Brother inlaw has borrowed my big one to do work at the house in Whistler.Grumpy So when I had to put new brake calipers on the truck I had to go do that at my father inlaws. Tongue Tied

I just pull the hose to the train room.

I have an Iwata Eclipse that I got for Christmas.

When I got it, I hung a spare piece of 18" x 8' hardboard up in the garage and rolled on some of my "backdrop blue" and with the airbrush proceeded to create a masterpiece. The wife rolled in with the kids after school and couldn't believe that I had actually airbrushed some pretty decent mountains. The next day I rolled over my masterpiece once again with the blue, with a great anticipation of doing even better! I should have quit while I was ahead. My second effort was very deflating. Took me back to my first art class in grade 1.Sigh I am now getting better and love any chance to use the airbrush. 

I have the rusty rails track painter that I find works very well. Now I have the airbrush, I use that on the track and anything else I can find and have a lot of fun doing it.

Good luck!

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1/videos 

You can never ever out-train poor nutrition.

JLK
  • Member since
    March 2011
  • From: Lancaster County PA
  • 158 posts
Air Brush Setups
Posted by JLK on Sunday, November 16, 2014 2:24 PM

Just a little curious here. I would like you to describe or post pitures of your Air brush setup if you have one. Mine is a 5 gallon air tank with a cheap Harbor Frieght regulator. The air brush is also from Harbor Freight. Went kinda cheap for my first one.

Justin

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